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WAR DIARY 



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German Naval Staff 
Operations Division 




SEP 13 1948 



PART A 



VOLUME 37 



UBCU ' l 



DEC^ 






SEPTEMBER 1942 



B-1052 



J 





*• 



WAR DIARY OF THE GERMAN NAVAL STAFF 
(Operations Division) 

PART A 
September 19*2 



Chief, Naval Staff: Grand Admiral Raeder, Dr. h. e. 

Chief of Staff, Naval Staff: Admiral Frlcke 

Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff: Captain Wagner 



Volume 37 



begun: 1 Sep. 19*12 

closed: 30 Sep. 19*2 






Sift J* 






CONFIDENTIAL 



OFFICE OF NAVAL INTELLIGENCE 
Washington, D. C. 



Foreword 

1. The Office of Naval Intelligence has undertaken to translate 
Important parts of the War Diary of the German Naval Staff. The 
present volume, entitled War Diary of the German Naval Staff, Op- 
erations Division , Part A, Volume 37 la the e leventh one of the 
series to appear. Other volumes will follow sTxorfly. 

2. The War Diaries, Fart A, are Important because they contain a 
day by day summary of the Information available to the German Naval 
Staff and the decisions reached on the basis thereof. Together with 
the Fuehrer Conferences on Matters Dealing with the German Navy, 1939- 
1°^5 < which have been published by this office, the War Diaries should 
provide valuable material for the study of naval problems arising from 
total war. The War Diary, Part A, is also a useful index to the German 
Naval Archives of World War II; references may be found in the micro- 
film library of Naval Records and Library. 

3. Due to the cost of publication, only a limited number of 
copies could be made; it is therefore desirable that the copies 
which have been distributed are made available to other offices 
which may be Interested. 



Washington, D. C. 
19*8 



c 



' 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

South America : 

The Transocean News Service reports with regard to the situation in 
South America that a bill calling for the severance of relations with 
the Axis powers is under consideration by the Argentine Chamber of 
Deputies, and that the bill may be passed. However, since the Govern- 
ment controls the Senate majority, a resolution of the Chamber of 
Deputies would not be binding. 

A diplomatic source reveals that the President and the Foreign Minister 
of Chile apparently intend to delay the decision about the attitude 
of this country toward the Axis until after the President's return 
from a trip to North America. A sudden change of the policy followed 
thus far is hardly to be expected, unless something unusual happens. 

It is reported from Columbia that this country is actually getting 
closer and closer to war. 

According to a U.S.A. news agency report, President Roosevelt's South 
American representative is visiting the different countries in order 
to reorganize shipping. 

In Uruguay the anti-Axis government policy is strongly influenced by 
Brazil and North America.- The press urges war. 

Turkey : 

The Foreign Minister stated, categorically to the German Embassy that 
there is only one possible solution of the problem of the Russian Black 
Sea fleet: Complete internment in a place acceptable to the Turkish 
Government, but positively not in a Mediterranean port. This decision 
is definitely not subject to negotiation and a change of this view- 
point is absolutely out of the question. 

Japan : 

Reports from a Swiss and an American journalist have it that the 
Japanese have found great quantities of raw materials in. the occupied 
countries, in spite of the Anglo American destruction tactics, and 
that there is sufficient tonnage available for their transport. Neither 
the unavoidable losses of men and material nor the restrictions and 
hardships caused by the war have been able to change Japanese public 
sentiment. The morale of the population is high and unbroken. Ample 
supplies of manpower, ammunition, and food are available for the con- 
tinuation of the war. An attack on Siberia is considered unavoidable 
by Japanese circles, unless an agreement ' with Russia can be reached 
about the demilitarization of the coastal areas. 

The Italian Ambassador at Tokyo points to the following statements of 
the spokesman for the Japanese Army as characteristic for Japanese 
domestic political propaganda: 

The war of greater Asia will not stop at the annihilation of Great 
Britain, the U.S.A. and of Chiang Kai-shek, but will be continued un- 
til the new world order is stabilized under the exalted leadership of 
the Emperor. The characteristics of this new order are that Japan will 
shape the order for the entire world according to the Japanese army's 
wishes and ideas and by the methods prescribed thereby. 

A_cleiir-l.y formulated!" bid for- world domination! 

-1- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

U.S.A. ; 

The press report that the American public is being prepared for a war 
lasting many years, if not decades. The Commander in Chief of the U.S. 
Navy, Admiral King, declared in a speech that the war would last a 
long time and that the battle in the Pacific now in progress is by no 
means over yet. 

Portugal ; 

The Portuguese Ambassador at Rio announced that Portugal would never 
fight against her American brethren. 

According to a German News Agency (DN3) reports, the economic agreement 
completed between Portugal and the U.S.A., as announced by Secretary 
of State Hull, is exclusively concerned with the sale to the U.S.A. of 
raw materials stored at Angola which cannot be shipped to Portugal. 



Conference on the Situation with the Chief, Naval Staff 

I. The Chief of Operations Division, Naval Staff reports about the 
completion of operation '*Y/underland". News about the successes ach- 
ieved is not to be released, in view of the intention to repeat this 
operation. The cruiser S CHEER carried out her mission resolutely and 
successfully. 

II. The Deputy to the Chief of the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division 
reports about direct negotiations between the Reich Commissioner of 
Maritime Shipping and Laval. According to information received thus 
far, Laval held out the prospect that about 200,000 tons of neutral 
cargo space in French Mediterranean ports could be used for the purposes 
of the Axis Powers, on condition that these vessels sail under neutral 
flag and with neutral crews. Additional conditions are that this 
would be the only demand of this nature and would not be repeated; 
furthermore, that the French be permitted to transport oil and food- 
stuffs from the Black Sea area on their own vessels. 

The Reich Commissioner received the Fuehrer's permission to accept 
these terms. 

III. The Chief, Naval Ordnance Division reports about the cyclonite 
incident. A review of the facts offers no indication that the loss of 
the destroyers LEBERECHT MASS and MAX SCHULTZ was caused by the de- 
tonation of German torpedo warheads due to bomb hits. The Permanent 
Representative of the Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer Head- 
quarters v/as supplied with all pertinent data for the information of 
the Fuehrer. 

The Chief, Naval Ordnance Division further suggests that a possibility 
be created to supply certain important personalities of the Naval High 
Command with increased food rations. Similar attempts to provide extra 
rations for personalities in the business world working under particu- 
lar strain have so far come to naught due to the opposition offered by 
the Reich Food Ministry as a matter of principle. 

The Commander in Chief, Navy orders an investigation of the matter. 



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-2-> 

B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

In a Very Restricted Circle ; 

IV. The Permanent Representative of the Commander in Chief, Navy at 
the Fuehrer Headquarters reported on 31 Aug.: 

a. The Rumanian Mountain Division which is to be ferried across 
the Kerch Strait is urgently needed for our further advance in the 
mountains. Since the division will proceed on foot on the eastern bank, 
it does not need to disembark in a harbor if a landing somewhere on 
the coast is possible. Field Marshal List reported to the Fuehrer that 
the Army has to rely on the Navy for the ferrying operation but that 

so far it has been impossible to carry it out owing to the hesitancy 
of the Navy. 

b. Field Marshal List further informed the Fuehrer that at the 
present time there are often enemy ships totalling as much as 30,000 
tons anchored off Tuapse, but that German PT boats are not being used 
successfully enough against them. The Fuehrer demands tha'; our forces 
be ruthlessly committed. 

To this the Naval Staff replied as follows: 

(1) The Navy commander concerned has repeatedly and un- 
mistakably informed the respective Army commands that the 
Navy is entirely at their disposal for Army operations. 
The ferrying, in the opinion of the Navy, is not a tacti- 
cal but a navigational problem. If the Army, after being 
duly warned of the existing danger, is willing to risk its 
troops, the Navy does not demand more consideration for 
its ships than the Army does for its manpower and valuable 
material. 

(2) For operations by small battle weapons, Russian air 
and naval defenses, especially by day, must be taken into 
account; we have nothing with which to fight them. It 
goes without saying that the Navy will make an all-out 
effort, as long as this does not mean risking our scarce 
combat forces without any chance of success. 

Naval Group South was informed of this telegram exchange, between Vice 
Admiral Krancke and the Naval Staff, with copies to the Naval Repre- 
sentative at the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff and The 
Navy Liaison Officer to the Army High Command. The Group was directed 
to confirm immediately that a complete understanding exists with all 
local army commands concerning the attitude of the Naval Staff with 
regard to point (1), and in the future to report in the daily situa- 
tion reports the assignments of its combat forces in sufficient detail 
so that any accusations can be answered at once with figures. 

The Chief, Naval Staff agrees with the measures taken, but wishes that 
similar insinuations be countered most rigorously. The Naval Staff is 
ordered to get in touch once more immediately with Vice Admiral Krancke 
to instruct him accordingly. 



Special Items: 

I. With regard to the transfer of ship "45" to the west area (see War 
Diary 31 Aug.) the following additional details must be reported: 



-3- 

8-1052 



c::~:3z:~:al 

1 Sep. IS 

Aug. with regard to the schedule 
::" ship ''43'', which is to sail during the October new noon 

period, points to the poor experiences about keeping secret the sail- 
ing of ship "23". The Group has therefore conceived the camouflage 
proposal already discussed, -he code Dame is to be "Sperrbrecher 12*. 
The Group has request e ;• exami -n and approval of the plan by 
Group '.Vest, together with the approval of the Naval Staff, 

On 21 Aug., the Naval Staff expressed agreement with the Group's con- 
tention that the sailing of ship ''45" must be keot secret better than 
that of ship "23**. However 4 the Naval Staff calls attention to the 
time involved and the constant mine threat prevailing during this period. 
The Naval Staff is convinced that the date of departure and the direc- 
tion of the voyage can be kept secret if orders are properly riven 
without necessitating that the ship be transferred elsewhere. The Na- 
val Staff therefore ordered the following general procedure, which in 
view of the noon phase sets 4 Oct. as the earliest sailing date for the 
dash through the Channel: 

a. The conr.ander in charge of the operation should receive in- 
structions from the Naval Staff during the week of 21 to 26 Sep., and 
discussions should be held with the Groups involved concerning the 
Channel breakthrough. 

b. On 28 Sep. the ship will depart for maneuvers in the central 
3altic Sea (fueling at sea, maintenance of contact, etc.). In the 

c curse of these maneuvers a coded radiogram, classified "general", will 
arrive from the Operations Division, Naval Staff, ordering the ship to 
^reva^re for an operation in the Arctic Ocean, and thus cancelling the 
operation in the Atlantic. 

This method worhed well in the case of ship n 28 n in that the captain 
did not announce any plan, but the radio personnel let the new order 
become known on the ship. The ship will be recalled from these maneu- 
vers with an order to proceed to Hamburg for shipyard overhaul in 
preparation for the operation in the north area. 

c. The ship will sail from the Baltic to the North Sea in a 
westbound convoy of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North and from 
there will proceed through the Channel. 

Thi ^procedure saves time and still leaves sufficient leeway for 

changes of schedule. The sailing for maneuvers appears plausible and ( 

creaks off the crew's communication with the shore. The code name ^ 

"Sperrbrecher 12" becomes effective at the latest when the ship leaves 

for rs« 

Poi: out that the procedure ordered by the Naval Staff is, in 

oral, identical with the method practiced thus far and which failed 
so completely the last time it vas used, Group North on 24 Aug. re- 
que tnce more that its proposal »f 16 Aug. be let stand; this pro- 
posal has been discussed with the captain of ship "45" in great detail. 

On 26 Aug. ."aval Staff informed the Group that its concern about the 
prolonged mine threat was undiminished and that the Naval Staff was ex- 
pecting a new suggestion from the Group with, regard to the effective 
date of the code name, but that the Naval Star." upholds the directive 
issued on 21 Aug. Subsequently, the Commanding Admiral, Group North 
again requested the Chief of Staff, Naval Staff on 28 Aug. by telephone 
to reconsider the decision of the Naval Staff. The results of this re- 
examination was reported in the conference with the Chief, Naval Staff 
31 A u.~ . 



-4- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



1 Sep. 1942 



On 1 Sep. the Group confirmed the final proposal in accordance with 
the Naval Staff's wishes. The Group pointed out that the secrecy of 
the operation is seriously endangered by the presence of Blohm 
personnel on board ship. 

Group West reported having no objections to the proposal made by Group 
North on 16 Aug. 

II. According to the July report of the Armed Forces High Command, War 
Economy and Armaments Division, it can be seen that the transport sit- 
uation has considerably improved and that the- tension in the labor 
situation has lessened to a certain extent .owing to the increased 
assignment of Russians. 



The Ministry for Armaments and War Production decided to create a new 
priority classification "Sonderstuf e DE" for the development or limited 
mass production of particularly urgent material and of equipment which 
must be procured as quickly as possible and v/ill be ordered only once. 



Complying with a Fuehrer dir 
(Reichsvereinigung Eisen) ha 
increased steel production o 
first stage and in the sec on 
tons per month. The second 
of November. This increase 
use of all available ore and 
quarter of 1943 it must be 
cline. 



ective, the National Steel Association 
s mapped a program which provides for an 
f 350,000 additional tons per month in its 
d stage for an overall increase by 550,000 
stage is to be reached already by the end 
can be achieved only by the indiscriminate 

scrap reserves. Beginning in the first 
anticipated that production will again de- 



Details ; 

The total number of foreign workers employed within Germany amounted to 
4,743,000 by the end of July; 1,512,000 of them were prisoners of war. 

Freight cars loaded reached an all-time peak with an average of 182,000 
cars per working day. 

Iron and steel production showed a slight gain. Coal production con- 
tinued to develop favorably. A production loss must be anticipated if 
the enemy day-time air raids in the western areas are not checked. 

As regards the industrial exploitation of the occupied eastern areas, 
the resumption of the Donets coal mining operations is an important 
factor. According to plan, the daily production should reach 30,000 
tons by the end of the year. 

The partisan problem is causing mounting difficulties. 

Rumanian grain imports are extremely disappointing and amount to less 
than 10^ of what they should be. 



Situation 1 Sep. 1942 
I. War in Foreign Waters 
1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report 



.5.. 



B-1052 



COHFIDEHTIAL 



1 Sen. 1942 



2. Own Situati 

The iraval Attache at Tokyo receives information by Telegram 
0415 about the agreement between the Naval Staff and the Japanese Ra 
concerning the boundaries of the respective zones of operation in the 
Indian Ccean. The sar.e telegram relates that freedom of action has 
been requested for the impending sailing of ship "10" to Yokohama. 
This applies to the route from £0° to 100° E In the waters between 20° 
and 30° S and continuing from 20°S,100° E to the approach point to 
Batavia; it includes a strip of 150 miles to either side of the course 
indicated. The ship will proceed through this area between 5 and 20 
Sep. Japanese consent has not yet been received. For the time bei: 
the Naval Staff has no intention of dispatching additional auxiliary 
cruisers to the Indian Ocean; it has, however informed the Japanese 
that it reserves the right to demand zn expansion of the operations 
zone to the north, in case the enemy situation should necessitate the 
transfer of an auxiliary cruiser from the South Atlantic to the In- 
dian Ocean. The reason for this reservation is the necessity to 
carry out supply operations in a zone of favorable weather. 

Complying with a proposal of her captain, ship "14" was given the tra- 
ditional name of auxiliary cruiser CORONEL. 



( 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to air reconnaissance, a convoy of 26 steamers and 
4 natrol vessels on a northerly course was located at 2055 in quadrant 
BE 3757. 

2. Own Situation : 

Outside the harbor entrance of Cherbourg a tugboat capsized 
and sank. 

3. Special Items : 

(1) The following directive of the Naval Staff concerning 
the distribution of light forces is transmitted to Group V.'est, the ( 

Fleet, and the Commander, Destroyers, with copy to Group North: 

a. The 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla is at the disposal of Na- 
val Group V.'est after being made ready for operations. Torpedo boats 
becoming available during the rconth of September are to be* transferred 
to the V.'est Area immediately following the fleet maneuvers early in 
October. Torpedo boats which become available at a later date, includ- 
ing T "22" and T "23", are to go there as soon as possible. 

b. The torpedo boats T "18" and T "19" are to be trans- 
ferred according to plan to the west area on 13 Sep. at the latest. 
Torpedo boat T "4" is to return to the shipyard only after the arrival 
of the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla. If necessary, the shipyard period 
is to be delayed for a few days. The dates for engine overhaul of 
torpedo boats T "10" and T "14"are to be checked, and they are to be 
altered after consultation with Group V/est if the situation In the 
west area requires it. 



_6- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

(2) In view of the difficulties of navigation caused by 
the location of St. Malo, the Commander, PT Boats deems it inoppor- 
tune to tie the PT boat arm to this place by constructing PT boat 
shelters there; he requests reexamination of the question whether 
St. Peter Port should be chosen instead, or whether the new PT boat 
shelter under construction at Cherbourg should be enlarged to accom- 
modate 34 vessels. In the opinion of the Commander, PT Boats, the 
location of the defensive mine fields is no impediment in the long 
run. With regard to distance, the location of Cherbourg is no less 
favorable than that of St. Malo. (See Telegram 2220.) 

This matter is being studied, in consultation with the Naval Staff, 
Quartermaster Division. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 
" Enemy Situation ; 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

Two mines were swept in the area of the Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, North. At noon, naval anti-aircraft guns fired at 2 enemy 
planes off Nordvik. Convoy and patrol operations proceeded accord- 
ing to plan. 

2. Norway, Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy 'Situation : 

On 31 Aug.", 10 steamers were anchored at Yokanga. On 1 Sep, 
1 steamer and 2 patrol vessels were sighted on a southeasterly course 
off Cape Teriberski and 2 more patrol vessels not far off on the same 
course. 

Own Situation ; 

In the area of the Commanding Admiral, Norway, a Russian 
battery fired 9 shells at the harbor of Petsamo on 51 Aug., without 
inflicting any damage. Slight enemy air activity over the west coast 
in the area of Kristiansand South. Transport and convoy operations 
proceeded v/ithout major incident. 

On 27 Aug., the Commanding General, Armed Forces, Norway requested 
500,000 coastal defense mines from the Naval Staff Operations Divi- 
sion, Mine V/arfare and Ant i -Submarine Section. Assuming that this 
request referred to land mines, the Naval Staff suggested that the 
General address this matter to the Commander in Chief, Army, The 
Commanding General, Armed Forces, Norway, however, repeated his re- 
quest, pointing out that he was referring to coastal defense mines 
and not land mines. The Naval Staff requests the Commanding Admiral, 
Norway to take this matter up with the Commanding General, Armed 
Forces, Norway for clarification. 



-7- 

B-1052 



( 



confidential 

1 Sep. 1942 

Ike Admiral, Arctl aan su a brief report of cruiser S CHEER con- 
cerning operation "'.Yunderland" : 

After Balling on 18 Aug., the cruiser avoided a 5,000 GRT steaner 
headed for Archangel in quadrant AC 2314 without being detected, and 
re-orted this incident on 21 Aug. by way of submarine U "251"-. On 
19 Aug. the northern steamer route was reconnoitered to a point east 
of the Einsankeitinsel. Due to difficult ice conditions, the cruiser 
turned back there. On 20 Au~., fuel was delivered to submarine U "251", 
and then the ship unsuccessfully searched for a convoy of 9 vessels, 
allegedly heading southwest, which had been located by a ship plane. 
It is possible that the plane erred with regard to the course. Since 
as a result of radio monitoring it was assumed that the convoy was pro- 
ceeding to the Vilkitski Strait, reconnaissance was resumed on 21 Au~ . 
to the east and west, but without result. A thrust in the direction 
of Russki Island had to be abandoned due to fog, and the ship took up 
a patrol position west of the Nordenskioeld Archipelago. On 22 and 23 
Aug. the r.easures on 21 Aug. were repeated. On 23 Aug., the ship 
plane located a convoy consisting of 10 steamers in the Vilkitski 
Strait, anchored off Gansen Island. (Not Hansen or Nansen Island.) 
On the evening of the same day the cruiser proceeded in the direction 
of the Yernak Bank to take up a patrol position. On 24 and 25 Aug. 
unsuccessful attempts were made to penetrate northwest of Russki 
Island for an attack on the convoy. This plan had to be abandoned due 
to the breakdown of the ship plane, making reconnaissance impossible. 
During a raid into the waters of the Nordenskioeld passages the ice 
breaker ALEKSANDER SIBIH2AK0V was destroyed after a brief gun battle. 
22 prisoners were taken. Radio monitoring revealed that the enemy was 
completely in the dark concerning the cause of this loss. Thereafter, 
the SCHEEH withdrew from this zone of operation and proceeded to 
Dickson Island on 26 and 27 Aug., entering the Dickson roadstead in 
the night, where the ice breaker TAIIYH and a 5,00C SHE tanker were 
probably sunk. The effect of shelling the harbor and a hitherto un- 
known battery, which answered the cruiser's fire, could not be ob- 
served due to poor visibility. After skirting Dickson Island, the 
ship bombarded the signal and radar locating stations as v/ell as the 
high power radio plant and the town itself with great and visible 
success, as already reported. Dickson Island reported the bombardment 
by the cruiser via radio. Throughout this entire operation, the 3 
submarines engaged in operation "".Vunderland" sent the SCEEER no re- 
ports of sighting the enemy. On 28 Aug., the SCEEER searched between 
Spitsbergen and Franz Josef Land for single ships without success and 
then started on her way home. / 

The Admiral, Arctic Ocean and the Commanding Admiral, Group North have 
voiced their deep appreciation for the efficiency with which this op- 
eration was executed. In this connection, the Commanding Admiral, 
Group North remarked that the fact that the steamer encountered on 18 
Aug. was permitted to escape Wis in keeping with the operational order, 
but that the destruction of similar valuable targets would have to be 
ordered in the future. The Group would also have liked to see the 

IER utilize the opportunity to send a message on the occasion of her 
contact with the enemy. The-'Group considers the experience gained by 
the SCHEER'S operation as a valuable source of information for future 
iertakings . 

The Naval Staff submits a corresponding report about operation "Y/under- 
land" in the Arctic Ocean during the period from 16 to 30 Aug. to the 
Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff, with copies to the Perman- 
ent Representative of the Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer 
Headquarters, to the Naval Aide of the Fuehrer, and to the Navy Liaison 



-8- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

Officers at the Amy High Command and at the Air Force Operations Staff; 
the Naval Staff also requests that the report not be made public, be- 
cause there is a chance that this operation will be repeated; this 
will be feasible until the end of September or early October, depend- 
ing on the ice conditions. The Naval Staff adds the following comment 
regarding the operation: "An operation successfully, daringly, and 
expertly carried out under particularly difficult conditions. The 
ship frequently met with a very hazardous ice situation. The action 
against Dickson Island must be especially commended in view of the 
difficulties of navigation (inadequate charts). The appearance of the 
pocket battleship in these waters evidently came as a complete surprise 
to the enemy, who may even now be unaware of the nature of the opera- 
tion." 

For copy see telegram 1/Skl I op 21540/42 Gkdos. in file "Operation 
SCHEER in the Kara Sea, Summer 1942 (Wunderland)". 

Group North directs the Admiral, Arctic Ocean (with copy to the Naval 
Staff and the 5th Air Force) to submit as soon as possible new pro- 
posals for an operation against the enemy supply traffic, as long as PQ 
convoys have not been observed; this plan should be based on the ex- 
periences of the SCHEER and the results of reconnaissance by sub- 
marines and the Air Force. To be considered are: 

(1) A repetition of the raid made by the SCHEER into the Kara 
Sea and the waters between the eastern Spitsbergen coast and Franz 
Josef Land, either by the SCHEER alone or together with the HIPPER. 

(2) A similar raid by the HIPPER alone or together with the 
SCHEER or with an escort of about 3 destroyers, which would be re- 
fueled by the HIPPER. 

(3) A raid of from 3 to 4 destroyers in the direction of Spits- 
bergen, the Barents Sea and the east coast of Novaya- Zemlya, either by 
themselves or with the KOELN. In this case, the operational radius 
would be 600 miles from the base. 

The operation in the Kara Sea and eastward is feasible only as long as 
ice conditions continue favorable, that is during September, For copy 
see telegram l/Skl 1692/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in file "Doppelschlag". 

Special Item : 

Group North mentioned on 14 Aug. in its estimate of the situation that, 
according to information by the Naval Staff, reports had been received 
on 10 Aug. about the arrival of a convoy in Russian ports. Investiga- 
tion of this matter revealed that the Group's remark referred to in- 
formation disclosed by the Chief of the Communications Division, 
Meteorological Branch, Naval Staff. The Operations Division, Naval 
Staff found out that the report, which had been requested by the Group 
from the Chief of the Communications Division, Meteorological Branch, 
Naval Staff over the phone, had clearly stated that it represented a 
news item from the press which was considered to have no significance. 
When the text was transmitted as requested, it was stated once more 
that the report was considered false. The Naval Staff informed Group 
North about these facts on 1 Sep. 



-9- B-1052 



t 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. IS 

IV. Skaperrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

One submarine was located by radio intelligence 22 miles 
west and one 7 miles east of the southern tip of Hogland. In the 
waters off Lavansaari, Shepel, and Kotlin lively mine-sweeping activ- 
ity was observed. Off Laga 3 medium and 9 small warships were sighted. 

2. Own Situation : 

The HELA, with the Fleet Commander on board, arrived in 
Copenhagen. South of Samsoe a ground mine was swept by a mine-explod- 
ing vessel. 

The destruction of a Russian submarine by Wine Sweeper V. "37" has been 
confirmed. During the night of 31 Aug. a subchaser had a brush with 3 
enemy PT boats northwest of Narva. 

The mine fields "Seeigel 23", "28", "29", and "30" were completed ac- 
cording to plan. 

Group North directed the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea (with 
copy to the 1st Air Force, a.o.) to restrict the use of naval forces 
in the inner Gulf of Finland as much as possible as long as the 1st 
Air Force is unable to provide fighter protection, unless the Finns can 
help out in this respect. 

The Commanding Admiral, Baltic Countries reports that the battery at 
Mummasaare and the Army Coastal Battery "509" at Kurgolovo are ready 
for action. Convoy and transport service continued as planned and 
without incident. 

Special Item ; 

Group North repeatedly suggested to the Naval Staff that the naval 
forces in the Baltic Sea be reinforced. In this Group North is guided 
by the thought that the Russian fleet could some day try to break out 
of the inner Gulf of Finland into the Baltic Sea, for instance for 
internment in Sweden. The Naval Staff is convinced that the Russian 
Baltic fleet would rather fight to the last, even when its anchorages 
are threatened, than leave and be interned, for political as well as 
psychological reasons. Furthermore, in the opinion of the Naval Staff / 

the Gulf of Finland is sealed off so effectively that attempts to ^ 

break out would result in very heavy losses. Under no circumstances 
would more than a few vessels succeed in reaching open water. The dis- 
advantages which might thereby be caused must be risked in view of the 
fact that submarines, PT boats, and other combat forces would have to 
be withdrawn from other war theaters, thus creating serious shortages 
in those places. 

The Permanent Representative of the Commander in Chief, Navy at Fuehrer 
Headquarters; the Naval Representative on the Armed Forces High Command, 
Operations Staff; the Navy Liaison Officers to the Army High Command 
and the Air Force Operations Staff are informed of this viewpoint 
taken by the Naval Staff. 



-10- 

1 B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Lively air reconnaissance, particularly heavy in the Bay of 
Biscay, where the sighting of 4 submarines was reported. Two more 
submarine sighting reports were intercepted from tiie West Indies, one 
more from southeast of Bahia, and another southwest of Rio. 

2. Own Situation : 

4 submarines sailed from French Atlantic ports and 4 addi- 
tional ones from home port 3. 

Submarine U "601" of the Arctic Ocean Group "is advised that she may 
advance to approximately 90° E. The main operations area of sub- 
marine U "251" is between 70° and 00° E. Submarine U "255" is ordered 
to proceed, to the point of rendezvous with the ULM in quadrant AG- 9655. 

The operation in the North Atlantic against the convoy in quadrant AK 
was considerably hampered by the fact that the submarines got within 
the range of the enemy planes. Although almost all of the submarines 
were able to close in on the target, the results were meager. 2 
steamers were probably torpedoed. Several submarines report damage 
caused by depth charges and bombs. 

An additional convoy was observed on a southerly course in quadrant 
BE 2735, against which 5 submarines were assigned to operate on their 
way south. 

No sinkings have been reported from the eastern U.S. coast or the West 
Indies, or from the. South Atlantic submarine group. 

In the Mediterranean, submarine U "375" probably sank 1 steamer 
(4,000 GHT) out of a convoy on 26 Aug. 

Additional reports are contained in the Supplement to the Submarine 
Situation, War Diary, Part B, Vol.. IV. 

With submarine U "179" the first of the large submarines type IX D has 
reached the zone of operations. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

During the day Dungeness was attacked by fighter bombers; 
during the night of 1 Sep., 6 of our planes raided Sheffield, Hull, 
Leeds, etc. 

2. Enemy Incursions t 

180 enemy planes flew over our territory, 155 of them over 
Germany proper, concentrating their attacks on Warsaw and Saarlautern. 

3. Mediterranean Theater t 

Fighter bombers, dive bombers, and bombers operated in North 
Africa - in- -support— of- t h e o f f erial ve of tha Panzer _Army_» 

-11- 

B-1052 



co::?idz:~:.-.i 

1 Sep. 1: 

4. EgLatern ~r~r~ : 

Nothing to reoort. 



I 



VII. ""arfare ir. the Mediterranean and the Slack Sea 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

V.es'rrr. Mediterranean ; 

Accorii: ~ tc an intelligence report from Spain, 36 planes flew 
in from the Atlar.tic to Gibraltar by 2000; they are expected to proceed 
to the east. At 020C one tanker escorted by 1 corvette arrived in Gi- 
braltar from an unknown direction, and 1 CALEDON-class cruiser arrived 
fr: the Atlantic. The CIL-.-VdBDIS remained outside and east of the 
harbor during the day, probably for maneuvers. 

traces could be found during the day of 19 vessels which were again 
reported in the Strait of Gibraltar on an easterly course during the 
night of 31 Aug. 

Central and Eastern Mediterranean ; 

I'd reports about the sighting of ships were received, except 
for a warship of unidentified type which was reported by a Geman plane 
45 niles southwest of the southeastern tip of Crete on a course of 310° 

However, radio monitor!.-.:; intercepted reports of lively reconnaissance 
activity and attacks against ~-erman convoys, both in the Central and 
Eastern Mediterranean. 

2. Own Situation ; 

During an enemy air raid on Tobruk during the night of 30 Aug, 
the oil pipe line was damaged. The steamer M0NSTELLA was towed to Corfu 
on 31 Aug. where she is teir.g unloaded. 

The German Naval Command, Italy reported that the Italian Navy agrees 

to the proposal of assignir.r Augusta as a base and operational harbor 

to the 7th PT Boat Flotilla. As soon as the 7th PT Boat Flotilla ( 

reaches Augusta, the 3rd PT 3oat Flotilla will transfer to Porto 

Empedocle. 

The Commanding Admiral, German Naval Command, Italy is proceeding to the 
command post. North Africa, in order to assume command of all naval 
forces and ships of the German Navy based In North Africa. 

Special Iter. : 

The mining of the approaches to Malta, which inflicted some losses on 
the enemy due to its surprise element, has nevertheless not succeeded 
in disrupting enemy shipping. The efforts 'to "cut the supply of Malta 
by mining aperationa oust therefore be continued and r~.de r.zre effective. 

The Naval Staff sees possibilities of increasing the effect of the min- 
ing operation in the following measures 1 

(a) By closing the waters between the southern tip of Malta and 
the 500 m line with a number of mine fields and by the extensive use of 
-e-ufefeing-f loats . 

B-1052 

-12- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

(b) By effective minelaying by the Navy and the Air Force to 
seal off the eastern tip of the island. 

(c) By aerial mining of Valletta harbor. 

A directive to this effect is sent to the German Naval Command, Italy 
and the Naval Representative on the Air Force Operations Staff. They 
are requested to see that the Commanding General, South issues the 
necessary orders. 

For copy see 1/Skl I E 21260/42 Gkdos. in V/ar Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

During the night of 31 Aug. the north-bound convoy PUGLIOLA 
was attacked by enemy planes southwest of Crete; also the steamer 
BOTTIGLIERI, en route from Suda to Benghazi, and the 2 tankers ABRUZZI 
and P.C. FASSIO, en route from Taranto to Tobruk, were all unsuccess- 
fully attacked by enemy planes. Otherwise transports proceeded accord- 
ing to plan. 

Unloaded at Tobruk on 30 Aug.: 

494 tons plus 750 tons from tankers; 

on 31 Aug.: 1,242 tons plus 80 tons from tankers 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report about the naval situation. 

The Commanding Admiral, Aegean Sea has delivered about 12,000 tons of 
fuel to Italian ships in the course of the transport operations to 
North Africa; supported in his stand by Naval Group South, he strongly 
protests against the demand made by the Naval Staff, Quartermaster 
Division, Supply and Fuel Branch, that deliveries out of German stores 
should only be made after previously obtaining permission. Such a 
ruling would interfere with his command authority in matters for which 
he is responsible. Group South submits proposals to ensure the fuel 
supply of Italian ships in the Aegean Sea. For details see Telegram 
1800. 

The Naval Staff, Quartermaster Division is attending to this matter. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

The 3rd Mine Sweeper Flotilla began mine-sweeping operations 
north of the Kerch Strait on 31 Aug. The flotilla was under unsuccess* 
ful long-range fire of an enemy battery. 

The harbor entrance of Temryuk was cleared by blasting to a width. of 
25 m and a depth of 2.75 m. 

Bad weather affected convoy operations. 



.13- B " 1052 



piDiarriAL 



1 Ser. 1941 



Between 26 and 30 Aug., 1,665 tens of anr.unitlor. were shipped fron 
iupol and Ta5anrog to Azov. 

.-.rr.y Group A inforned Naval Group South of a decision by the Army High 
Comnand whereby shipping ar.d transports fron Rostov up the Don are to 
be in the hands of the 3rd Field Waterways Detachnent. 

Croup South advocated essentially this viewpoint in the past, in con- 
trast to that of Army Group A and the Naval Shore Commander, Ukraine. 
(See Telegram 1950. ) 



VIII. Situation Fast Asia 

The Military Attache at Bangkok reports concerning the situatior 
in the southwest Pacific between 9 and 29 Aug. anongst other things: 

"I an informed by the Japanese India Bureau that the encr.y forces in 
India are estimated at less than 10 divisions, equipped with compara- 
tively ample materiel; the number of units nade up of Europeans is 
snail, however, and the number of planes is given as 400. The Japanese 
believe that the coming campaign in India would be of even nore pro- 
nounced colonial character than the Malaya and Burma campaigns. There- 
fore fewer Japanese forces are being provided for this assignment; 
probably 2 or 3 divisions will be sent across the Burma borders, and 
2 nore divisions will be landed. The operation is to be executed 
similar to the landing on northern Luzon in the Philippines, that is, 
first enemy air bases will be seized by airborne forces and seaborne 
units. Japanese flying boats, based on the Andaman Islands, recon- 
noitered the east coast of India. The preparations for an invasion of 
Ceylon are apparently being given priority." 

Sunatra : Contrary to Japanese expectations, the oil production of the 
first year has already reached c, COO, 000 tons; for the second year it 
is planned to push this figure to 6,000,000 tons. 

l'e\-: Guinea ; Folic a renewed failure to advance over land from 
Kuon Gulf toward Port 1'oresby, the Japanese succeeded in landing on the 
southeastern tip near Llilne Bay. American fighters and bombers were 
observed. 

air activity (Rabaul). 



Bismarck Archive 


lago: 


- -• 
, — 

IS 

of 


vely en err; 


Solomon Isl 
as follows: 


ands : 
Att 


The 
ts 


litary Att 
the . 



Military Attache describes the situation there 
of the U.S.A. to regain these islands led to 2 



major naval engagements. T- A er leans succeeded in landing air forces 
on Tulagij Guadalcanal, and "alaita. A seesaw battle with the Japanese 
garrison is in progress on Tulagi Island. 

Australia : American rcinforcenents were brought up by air transport. 
Japanese submarines are operating off New Zealand and off the Austral- 
ian south coast. Japanese air forces raided Port Iledland, Broome, and 
..'yndhan, and concentrated on Port Darwin. 

According to British press reports, the Japanese fleet has now been 

[drawn from the southwest Pacific after suffering heavy losses 
(15 ships sunk and danaged). 



_14_ B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1 Sep. 1942 

According to American reports of 31 Aug., the Japanese forces landed 
in Milne Bay were almost completely annihilated. 

According to a Dome! report, an enemy landing attempt on Hew Britain, 
undertaken by one submarine, ended with the destruction of the sub- 
marine and the capture of the small landing detachment. 



IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

The enemy is tenaciously defending the mountain valleys 
south of Krasnodar. Southwest of Baksansk enemy attacks broke down 
on the sector of the Rumanian Mountain Division. South of Isherskaya 
the enemy is entrenched in a system of heavily fortified positions and 
is bringing up reinforcements from the south and southwest. 

Army Group B; 

The area west of the railroad Astrakhan-Kizlyar was cleared 
of the enemy. The tracks were blown up by a long-range patrol and a 
train was set afire. West of Astrakhan approximately 20 trains were 
observed. Along the chain of lakes south of Malyye Derbety the enemy 
in front of the Rumanian division was reinforced. Our divisions which 
had advanced beyond the Don-Volga are engaged in heavy fighting with 
Russian tank forces. At Kremenskaya the enemy retreated behind the 
Don River. The Situation at Serafimovich has been restored. 

Central Army Group ; 

No major engagements took place on 31 Aug. at the crucial 
points in the Zhizdra River sector and the Rhzev area. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Enemy attacks resulted in varying success at Kholm, Staraya 
Russa, Denyansk, on the Pola River and at Soltsy. Very fierce fight- 
ing resulted from the enemy attack launched south of Lake Ladoga with 
strong forces and tanks along the entire front up to the Lovat River; 
it required bringing up our entire reserves. Enemy pressure continues. 
The situation is difficult. 

2. Finnish Front ; 
Nothing to report. 

3. North Africa ; 

No report was received from the Panzer Army. 

According to a Router report, the British troops were withdrawn from 
Abyssinia. 

Official British reports have it that an engagement with light forces 
developed in the morning of 31 Aug. at El Himeinrah as a result of an 
attack by Rommel. The fight is still in progress. A weak attack 



-15- B-1052 





i Sep. i: 

Italic:. - : cer.tral front sector is said to 

e 'zczr. repulse 

The attac'-: on Tobruk luring it of 30 Aug. is said to have been 
carried out bv severe! U.S.A. heav^ bonber for~?.tior.s. 

* 



» 



-16- &-1C52 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Brazil ; 

President Vargas has declared a state of war, so that the order for 
general mobilization can be issued. 

Japan ; 

Foreign Minister Togo has resigned. According to press comments, the 
reasons for this step are personal. The Prime Minister has taken over 
the Foreign Ministry. The Prime Minister also announced that he in- 
tends to create a Ministry of Greater East Asia which will administer 
all matters relating to the territories occupied by Japan and promote 
the production of raw materials in these areas. He emphatically de- 
manded that Japanese armed might be strengthened and a very high degree 
of cooperation betv/een all branches of the armed forces be achieved. 

Spain ; 

According to the German News Agency (DNB), Franco has declined for the 
time being to accept the resignations of the 3 defense ministers. 



Conference on the Situation with the Chief, Naval Staff 

I-. The Deputy to the Chief, Naval Staff Quartermaster Division re- 
ports; 

(a) The opposition of Staatsrat Blohm against the manufacture of 
collapsible landing craft has finally been overcome. 6 such vessels 
are now being constructed at Leyden and 6 at Rheinhausen and will be 
delivered in 4 months. 

(b) The Chief of Staff, Armed Forces High Command has ordered that 
in addition to the 10,000 tons of fuel already delivered to the 
Italians out of the Navy's supplies, another 10,000 tons have to be 

put at their disposal in September. A new directive regarding October 
will follow. The Minister. of Economics is to negotiate with Rumania 
about deliveries, but the prospects are considered poor. At present 
Germany's fuel oil situation is relatively good. Rumanian petroleum 
production must be expected to decline further during the coming winter. 

II. The Chief of the Foreign Affairs Section, Operations Division , 
Naval Staff reports about the conferehces between the Reich Commissioner 
of Maritime Shipping and Laval regarding the availability of ships ly- 
ing in French Mediterranean ports (see War Diary, 1 Sep.;. For de- 
tails see War Diary, Part C, Vol. VIII. 

III. In reply to an inquiry by the Chief, Naval Staff concerning the 
state of German warfare against Brazil, the Chief of the Naval Staff 
Operations Division reports: In accordance with a directive from the 
Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command, German submarines are at 
present under orders not to attack Brazilian harbors or ships v/ithin 
20 miles of the Brazilian coast; these orders were issued at the re- 
quest of the Minister for Foreign Affairs. The Foreign Office asked 
for temporary restraint because of the effect further sinkings might 
have on the attitude of Argentina and Chile. 



*17- 

B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

In a Very Restricted circle : 

IV. The Chief of Operations Branch. Naval Staff reports ; 

a) about the short report of the SCIEER regarding operation 
n V/underland", as recorded in the War Diary of 1 Sep. 

b) regarding the charges made against the Navy in connection 
with operation "Bluecher II" and the PT boat operations in the Black 
Sea. 

According to a report from Vice Admiral Krancke, it cannot safely be 
maintained that Field Marshal List made these accusations. Admiral 
Krancke was present only at part of the conference between the Fuehrer, 
List, and Keitel. The steps planned against Field Marshal List must 
therefore be dropped. Vice Admiral Krancke has meanwhile seen to it 
that the Fuehrer and the Armed Forces High Command have received the 
correct information on the basis of materials submitted by Group South 
in the meantime. 

Group South states that the charges made by Army Group A (see War 
Diary, 1 Sep.) are completely unjustified. As far as the Navy is con- 
cerned, the tasks connected with the ferrying were clear ever since 
10 Aug., and on 22 Aug. the Admiral, Black Sea v/rote to the ,Chief of 
Staff, Group South, exactly as follows: "This waiting for 'Bluecher' 
Is very trying, and I have just let Scheuerlen know once more that we 
had better watch out, lest we run completely into the September bad 
weather period. However, I am very much afraid that Mattenklott is 
not wholeheartedly in favor of the operation, has distinct misgivings 
with regard to the sea voyage, and is hoping that the combat mission 
will turn out to be merely a ferrying mission; consequently very valu- 
able cargo space is lying about more or less idle for a long time." 

The Group requests that this information not be used for the time being 
since it is taken from a private letter and because we do not want to 
accuse an Army commander as readily as is evidently the case the other 
way around. It has been made clear over and over again to the Army and 
the Army Group, that everything connected with the problem of supplies 
and that includes the break through the Kerch Strait, v/ill be done ac- 
cording to the wishes of the Army. Also the decision as to the risk 
involved lies with the Army. The Navy simply furnishes information 
about the possible consequences for later operations as, for instance, 
the additional commitment of landing craft; otherwise it continues to 
carry out its tasks until the Army is fully aware of these consequences 
and is willing to accept them. 

From the data available to the Group (photo reconnaissance and its in- 
terpretation), generally only about 13,000 tons of shipping are lying 
inside the harbor of Tuapse and not outside of it. On the basis of 
numerous operations carried out so far, the Admiral, Black Sea had 
reached the conclusion that the Russians had shifted their supply 
traffic from night to daytime, due to the activities of our naval 
forces; this belief was based on the fact that little or frequently 
no traffic at all had been encountered. PT boats can, of course, not 
go into action every day and the Air Force is obviously concentrating 
on other tasks. 

The Group points out that Admiral Brinkmann has left for a conference 
v/ith the Admiral, Black Sea. After next Wednesday, he will visit 
Army Groups A and B and the Navy Liaison Officer at the Army High 
Command, so thf.t ho can be called on to help clarify this question. 
-( S oc Tel e g r am 1 000. ) 



k 



a. 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

Telegram 1800 likewise contains a report concerning the operations of 
light naval forces, submitted by Group South in accordance with the 
Naval Staff directive. The 1st PT Boat Flotilla was in action un- 
interruptedly from 2 Aug. to 10 Aug. Operations which had been planned 
for the periods 11 to 20 Aug. and 24 to 30 Aug. could not be carried 
out due to bad weather. On all other days operations were carried out 
and successes achieved. Moreover, Group South has ordered all sub- 
ordinate commands concerned to submit all relevant information which 
might be used to evaluate or refute the charges made (see Telegram 
0938). 

The Admiral, Black Sea is given explicit orders not to undertake any 
steps of his own with regard to Army Group A at this time, but to 
leave this to the Commander in Chief, Navy. 

The Navy liaison officers at the Army High Command and the Air Force 
General Staff, and the Permanent Representative of the Commander in 
Chief, Navy at Fuehrer Headquarters have been fully informed of the 
above. 

For copies of the telegrams exchanged in the matter see 1/Skl la 
21609/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XI Va. 

The Chief, Naval Staff is leaving for northern France in the afternoon 
on an inspection tour of the Dieppe area and will be absent from Berlih 
until the morning of 4 Sep. 



Special Items ; 

I. With regard to the Naval Staff's review of the situation at Crete 
(l/Skl lb (plan) 1381/42* Gkdos. Chefs, in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV) 
the Commanding Admiral, German Naval Command, Italy comments as fol- 
lows : 

Because of my long and extensive experience in working with the 
Italians, I feel that I should add a few words to the conclusions 
reached in the matter, with which I fully agree: 

We have no guarantee that the Italians will give active and loyal 
support to German interests after this war. Apart from the fact that 
the attitude "of the Italians from the political point of view is and 
always will be purely egotistical, their working methods, according to 
German criteria freauently lack the necessary energy and systematic 
thinking even in their own interests. All the less can it be expected 
that they will work in the interest of Germany when this conflicts 
with their own interest, as in Greece and Asia Minor. German inter- 
ests can be upheld in a way adequate for the future of the country 
only if supported by military might. 

For further discussion of this question see 1/Skl 1686/42 Gkdos. Chefs j 
in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV. 

II. An intelligence report from a not too reliable source, dated 
Stockholm, 31 Aug., mentions preparations for large-scale air raids on 
Stettin, Magdeburg, Chemnitz and the inland port Duisburg-Hamborn, 
Allegedly an attack on Vichy is planned, too. Large tow barges, total- 
ling 2,500,000 tons, are said to be in readiness for troop transports 
in various northern harbors of the British Isles, a part of them in The 
Wash an d a t . Hull . -During the pas-t 4 -weeks 200^,000 -tons -of— vmr 
materiel were reportedly shipped to Murmansk and Archangel from the 



s 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



2 Sep. 1942 



British Isles. 

The German Embassy at Madrid with due reservation transmits a report, 
according to which a British courier letter intercepted 2 weeks ago by 
Spanish authorities indicates that Anglo-American landings in northern 
Spain are planned. Investigations made by the Spanish General Staff 
are said to have confirmed this assumption. According to them, the 
British and Americans intend to land at several suitable small coastal 
places west and east of Santander. Immediately following a successful 
landing, the government would be overthrown with the assistance of the 
monarchists, the Reds would be freed and armed, and Spain thrown into 
chaos. The British consular officers at Santander and Bilbao are said 
to be actively engaged in the preparations for the landings; the 
Spanish General Staff therefore reportedly proposed to the Foreign 
Ministry the expulsion of the British consul Battes, the Cuban consul 
Almagna San Martin and the American consul Pedro Nogues Alonso (all 
of Santander) as well as the arrest of the chief pilot of Santander 
and other Spaniards in the British service.. 

This is the second instance that alarming news was 
found in allegedly genuine British courier material 
intercepted in Spain. It is altogether possible that 
this method is being used to spread false rumors. The 
Stockholm intelligence report, too, bears close ex- 
amination. 



Situation 2 Sep. 1942 

I. Warfare in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

North Atlantic : 

At 2240 the British 7,742 GRT steamer LIANAAR sent a QQQ 
message, reporting a suspicious ship approximately 300 miles southeast 
of Freetown; this report was revoked 20 minutes later. 

Indian Ocean ; 

Approximately 340 miles east of Aden the British tanker 
BRITISH GENIUS sighted a periscope and evaded a torpedo. 

It is highly gratifying to see Japanese submarines 
active in these waters. 

According to a Budapest intelligence report of 2 Sep., a U.S. convoy 
arrived at Bandar Shahpur during the second week of August. 3 steamers 
unloaded there and 3 smaller steamers at Bushire and Khorramshahr. The 
larger ships of the convoy came, from Halifax, while the smaller ones 
had joined at Baltimore. A Russian commission is said to have taken 
over the tanks delivered at Bandar Shahpur and to have shipped them 
immediately to the Caucasus. It was allegedly the largest shipment of 
tanks ever sent from Canada to Russia. 



^ 



-20- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

Pacific Ocean ; 

Allied reconnaissance reported at 0555, 1 cruiser and 2 de- 
stroyers on a course of 350° at d'Entrecasteaux Islands off the south- 
eastern tip of New Guinea; another 2 cruisers on zig-zag courses were 
reported between 0825 and 0928. 

2. Own Situatlon t 

The Naval Staff confirmed to the CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN by 
Radiogram 1057 that ships "28" and "23" had reported on 29 Aug. that 
they had received supplies from the CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN and dismissed 
her. The Naval Staff therefore deduces that the supply ship started oh 
her way to Japan on 29 Aug. as ordered on 21 Aug. 

The Naval Staff confirms by Radiogram 1947 to the TANNENFELS the re- 
port received by ship "10" according to which the TANNENFELS was dis- 
missed on 30 Aug. to the waters 1° farther west and 240 miles farther 
south than point "Trimmplan". The Naval Staff therefore assumes that 
the TANNENFELS is proceeding in accordance with the order of 19 Aug. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Reconnaissance in the Channel brought no observations of 
particular interest. 

2, Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

An enemy air raid on La Pallice occurred between 0710 and 
0716. 3 mine sweepers went to the aid of an Italian submarine damaged 
by aerial attack in quadrant BF 8390 and 3 went to the aid of a German 
submarine disabled in BF 5340 and unable to submerge. 

At 0715 the supply ship PASSAT, anchored in the St. Nazaire roadstead, 
was attacked by a low-flying enemy plane; no air raid alarm had been 
sounded previously. She was badly damaged by a bomb hit at the stern 
and set afire. It was possible to extinguish the fire. Casualties 
are considerable. Attempts are being made to tow the ship to port. 

The loss of this valuable vessel which was ready to sail for the supply 
of the auxiliary cruisers is a very serious blow. It remains to be 
seen how much of her cargo can be salvaged. 

Prompted by today's air raids on the roadsteads of La Pallice and St. 
Nazaire, Group West calls the attention of the 3rd Air Force to the 
necessity of reinforcing the- anti-aircraft defenses, since roadsteads 
are indispensable as alternate anchorages, and even valuable ships must 
use them at times for limited periods. 

The Group suggests that anti-aircraft barges like those requested for 
the Gironde estuary be provided for La Pallice and St. Nazaire also, 
and if this should prove impossible, 4 anti-aircraft vessels at each 
place. 



-& 



1-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

Channel Coast ; 

Nothing to report about the naval situation. 

Group West reports on the further enlargement of the flanking mine- 
fields in the Channel: mining of the gaps betv/een D2 and El (code name 
"Runenschrift") and between C2 and Dl (code name "Ranke") by means of 
cutter floats, to be carried out by motor mine sweepers based at 
Boulogne. 

The Naval Staff considers these measures very appropriate. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 
Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. * 

Own Situation : 

During the night of 1 Sep., 5 enemy planes flew over the 
Danish west coast. Little enemy air activity in the Dutch area. It 
is belatedly reported that a Spitfire was shot down in the forenoon of 
1 Sep. by mobile naval anti-aircraft guns at Scheveningen. 

The mine-exploding vessel "164" struck a mine in the Hubertgat and 
sank. North of Borkum, the steamer MATTHIAS STINNES, in the Elbe-Ems 
traffic, struck a mine, but remained afloat. 5 ground mines were swept 
on the convoy route betv/een Terschelling and Borkum. 

1 boat was damaged and towed to shore during an -enemy air attack on the 
Rhine Flotilla near Domburg. 

2. Norway, Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

According to air reconnaissance, 2 steamers on a southerly \ 

course were located in the western fairway off Kanin Nos; in Byelusha 
(on the southwest coast of Novaya Zemlya) 4 steamers and 6 patrol 
vessels were sighted. 

Own Situation : 

Within the area of the Commanding Admiral, Norway only mod- 
erate enemy air activity on the Arctic coast on 31 Aug., 1 and 2 Sep. 
Attacks on a westbound convoy off Sylte Fjord and on the Havningberg 
coastguard station were ineffective. From the We3t coast reports 
were also received of enemy daytime air activity on 1 and 2 Sep, 

Convoy operations continued according to plan. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

There is still no news from the ULM. Group North directs 
the Admiral, Arctic Ocean to cut short operation "Zar", whether com- 
p le t ed o r n o t . — Th e c orre s pond i ng - or de r Is tr a n s m i tt ed to the ULM b-y- 

422;- B-io52 



CONFIDENTIAL 



2 Sep. 1942 



the Admiral, Arctic Ocean via Radiogram 1508. 

Group North informs the Admiral, Arctic Ocean that it wishes operation 
"Doppelschlag" to be carried out as soon as possible, and suggests the 
following s 



On or about 3 Sep. the S CHEER and the HIPPER are to sa 
area, where the HIPPER will refuel; on 4 Sep. they are 
miles to quadrants AF 85-AT 33 at a speed of 21 knots 
destroyers carrying no mines. From there the SCHEER i 
the vicinity of Nordenskioeld Archipelago, Dickson Isl 
Yenisei River estuary; the. HIPPER to the mouth of the 
farther west. For 2 to 3 days they are to operate aga 
shipping and bombard the coast. Following this, they 
possible together, searching for ships sailing singly 
Zemlya and Spitsbergen. The Group is not planning to 
lay mines. 



il to the Gimsoe 

to proceed 200 
escorted by 3 
s to proceed to 
and, and the 
Ob River and 
inst enemy 
are to return, if 
betv/een Novaya 
have the HIPPER 



Operation "Doppelschlag" is under the command of Rear Admiral Meisel 
as senior commander. 



Group North, moreover, reports that it has given instructions for 
mining operation "Zarewitsch-Romanow", to be carried out by 4 mine- 
laying destroyers and 1 combat destroyer. For telegram see l/Skl 
1707/42 Gkdos. Chefs., in files "Doppelschlag". 



the Commanding Admiral, Group 
extend the operation of the 
made ready for this purpose (following 
at present 27 knots). The Commanding 
told that the operation may also be 
carried out by either the SCIIEER or the HIPPER, and he reported in 
this connection that the SCHEER is .not ready for action; for this 
reason it would be impossible to start the operation prior to 8 Sep. 



The Chief of Staff, Naval Staff informed 
North by telephone that it is planned to 

The TIRPITZ is to be 

her maximum speed is 

Group North has been 

by 



SCIIEER. 
repairs , 

Admiral, 



IV. Skagerrak. Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

During the night of 1 Sep. enemy air activity over the Baltic Sea 
as far as Kolberg. From there the enemy planes flew overland to War- 
saw and Kutno, and returned by the same route. More planes from the 
east flew over East Prussia and into the Warsaw area. 

Nothing of importance to report from the area of the Commanding Admirajl, 
Defenses, Baltic Sea. One He 177 crashed in quadrant A0 7261. 

The Commanding Admiral, Group North Intends an inspection tour to the 
area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea and the Commanding 
Admiral, Baltic Countries between 10 and 20 Sep. 

The mine fields "Seeigel 35" and "38" in the area of the Commander, 
Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea were laid according to plan. A Finnish mine 
layer in cooperation with 2 vessels of the 1st Motor Mine Sweeper 
Flotilla has completed mine field "Narpa". 

Anti-submarine patrols and convoy missions proceeded according to plan 
without major incidents. 



-23- 



8-1052 



:-::r:3L::r:Ai 

2 Sep. 1942 

V. Submarine V.'arf=re 

1. Enemy Situation ; 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation ; 

No reports were received from the submarines In the Norwegian 
area. 

The operations In the North Atlantic against the two convoys in quad- 
rant AL were cut short. The groups "Vorwaerts" and "Stier" were com- 
bined into a new task force "Vorwaerts", consisting of 13 submarines, 
for operations against a convoy from Great Britain to America which is 
expected on 4 Sep. 

No reports about the achievements of the submarines operating on the 
American coast were received. 

Submarine D "109" reports from quadrant FF 3650 the sinking of the 
10,000 GHT steamer ::i3HT after a chase of 22 hours. 

Additional reoorts in Supplement to Submarine Situation in Vi'ar Diary, 
Part 3, Vol. IV. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 

German fighter bombers raided the Isle of Wight during the 
day. Also a sailing cutter was sunk. During the night of 2 Sep. five 
Ju 88' s raided Leeds. 

2. Incursions : 

200 of the 216 enemy flights reported during the night of 2 
Sep. penetrated into German territory. The attacks centered on 
Karlsruhe, where 50 to 60 planes wrought considerable damage. For de- 
tails see "daily situation report. 

3. Mediterranean Theater ; 

Our rlar.es flew combat missions in support of the Panzer 
Army and carried out reconnaissance. 

4. Eastern Front : 

130 planes were reported shot down at the various army 
sectors. The airfield of thirmashi on the Arctic coast was attacked. 
Reconnaissance activity at all other sectors of the Eastern Front. 



VTI. ?«'arfare in the Mediterranean and the 31ack Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

The C-class cruiser sailed from Gibraltar on 1 Sep. and one 

-24- 

B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

tanker arrived there during the night of 1 Sep. Three loaded tankers 
escorted by 3 corvettes arrived from the Atlantic. At noon the follow- 
ing ships were in Gibraltar: 2 battleships, 2 cruisers, one of which 
in dock, 1 auxiliary cruiser, 5 destroyers, 21 steamers, and 11 
tankers. 81 planes were on the airfield. 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, Gibraltar is allegedly 
expecting the arrival of aircraft carriers and battleships to serve as 
escort of a most important convoy to the Mediterranean. 

An unusually large number of submarines was reported sighted in the 
Central Mediterranean. 

No reports about the sighting of other warships or steamers were re- 
ceived from the Central and Eastern Mediterranean. According to radio 
intelligence, air reconnaissance activity over these waters was partic- 
ularly lively and successful. Malta-based planes reported a destroyer 
on a westerly course off Cape Spartivento and a tanker and 3 destroyers 
on a southerly course south of Corfu. Alexandria-based planes reported 
a convoy of 1 steamer and 1 destroyer steering a northwesterly course 
off Cape Krio and 7 lighters sailing eastward off Derna. 

Photo reconnaissance of 1 Sep. revealed that 5 steamers totalling ap- 
proximately 25,000 GRT arrived in the harbor of Suez. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

German PT boats off Alexandria had to discontinue their op- 
eration during the night of 1 Sep. due to weather conditions. Marsa 
Matruh was raided by enemy planes during the night of 31 Aug. and 
Bardia at noon of 1 Sep. No damage was reported from either place. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

During the night of 1 Sep. the tanker P.C. FASSIO was sunk 
off Derna by enemy planes. In the same area the escorted tanker 
ABRUZZI with 484 tons of fuel for the German Army was damaged by a 
bomb hit on the evening of 1 Sep. and was abandoned by the crew. Another 
air attack occurred during the night of 1 Sep. on the escort of the 
steamer PROSERPINA east of Otranto. In the forenoon of 2 Sep. two 
empty landing barges were damaged by machine gun fire from enemy planes 
east-northeast of Derna. 

On 1 Sep. the German steamer MENES was damaged during an enemy bombing 
raid on Candia. 

Otherwise supply traffic to Africa and African coastal shipping pro- 
ceeded according to plan. 

The extraordinarily lively and successful enemy air 
activity against the African supply operations is ex- 
tremely troublesome as such, but particularly so at the 
present moment. The effect on the operations of our 
troops in Egypt is particularly harmful since supply 
traffic to Africa never reached the proportions necess- 
ary to permit adequate preparation for the land opera- 
tion now in progress, in spite of the constant pressure 
by the German Naval Command, Italy during the past 
weeks and in spite of the explicit promise of the Duce. 
On the other hand, it is becoming more and more evident 
how serious a matter it is that Malta is not yet in our 
possession and how appropriate it would have been to 

-25- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIA L 
2 Sep. 1942 

stick to the original plan "first 'Herkules', then 
Tobruk". We should not have abandoned this plan unless 
our Air Force had been strong enough to paralyze Malta 
in order to provide the greatest possible measure of 
safety for our supply shipping; our planes, however, 
were able to do this only for a very brief period. 

The amount of cargo unloaded at Tobruk on 1 Sep. was 1,297 tons. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea : 

The damage to the steamer MENES was caused by a short circuit 
and fire following a bomb hit on the main supply cable and the pier of 
Candia. The cargo below deck is probably undamaged. 

Otherwise, convoys in the Aegean operated according to plan. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance observed lively traffic of small vessels 
and PT boats south of Taman Peninsula. 1 heavy cruiser and 1 flotilla 
leader were located at sea off Poti. German planes attacked a sub- 
marine 120 miles south of Kerch. Lively shipping was observed on the 
Volga River. 

Own Situation : 

Operation "Bluecher 11* was initiated on the evening of 1 
Sep. as scheduled. The landing on the enemy coast has been in progress 
since 2 Sep. 0200 according to plan, and thus far without casualties. 

The 1st PT Boat Flotilla under Captain Toenniges, which operated off 
the south coast of the Taman Peninsula during the night of 1 Sep., 
torpedoed and sank 2 tankers, 2 steamers, and 6 large lighters, total- 
ling 15,400 GRT according to uncontestable observation. 

The Italian subchaser flotilla which wa3 sent out in the same night for 
torpedo operations south of the Kerch Strait encountered no targets. 
Another mission of the 1st PT Boat Flotilla against shipping off the 
Taman Peninsula is scheduled for the night of 2 Sep. The Italian sub- 
chasers cannot go into action due to weather conditions. 

Two Italian submarines cut short an operation off the Bessarabian coast 
on 1 Sep. due to bad weather. Convoy traffic was suspended in the 
afternoon of 1 Sep. owing to the weather; resumption is planned for 
4 Sep. 

Group South reports that the transshipments in the areas of the Black 
Sea and the Sea of Azov during the month of August reached a total of 
101,000 tons; it consisted of 36,000 tons of armed forces supplies to 
the Ukraine, 10,000 tons of armed forces supplies to other places, 
31,000 tons of non-military supplies, and 24,000 tons of return cargo. 



B-1052 

-26- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2 Sep. 1942 

VIII. Situation East Asia 

The German Admiral at Tokyo reports on the basis of Japanese in- 
formation: 

In the course of the second battle of the Solomon Islands, 1 enemy sub- 
marine, 2 destroyers, and 1 transport were sunk in a number of indi- 
vidual engagements. All planes which had landed on the Guadalcanal 
airfield were allegedly destroyed. The enemy is trying to safeguard 
the supply of the landed forces by every means. On 31 Aug. Japanese 
submarines attacked an enemy aircraft carrier off the southeastern tip 
of the eastern Solomon Islands; one torpedo hit was observed. In Milne 
Bay Japanese army units were landed to' seize the nearby airfield. 

It appears that both sides are making strong efforts to 
retain possession of the Solomon Islands and consider 
this matter as of greatest importance in view of the 
strategic significance of this island group for Australia, 



IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

In spite of beginning bad weather, landings on the Taman Pen- 
insula were made after 0200 of 2 Sep. according to the plans outlined 
for operation "Bluecher II**. 3 assault detachments were disembarked and 
took several villages south and southwest of the landing places by sur- 
prise; they were supported by fire from the battle ferries. Around 1500 
the northern part of the peninsula was in our hands. Also, the landing 
on the point southwest of Tamanskaya Bay succeeded as planned. The 
central part of the island was occupied where it is 1.5 km wide. 
Rumanian cavalry divisions advanced on the hills southwest of Temryuk. 
From Anapa the attack was carried south and southeast along the coastal 
road. 

Spearheads of the V Army Corps advanced in the direction of Novorossisk 
against strong enemy resistance. One of our battalions, which had been 
cut off, had to be extricated in hand-to-hand fighting south of Goryachi. 
The 111th, Infantry Division formed a bridgehead across the Terek River 
at Mozdok; the river was also crossed southv/est of Kislyar by units of 
the 370th Infantry Division. 

Army Group B : 

Southwest of Stalingrad German and Rumanian divisions have 
advanced beyond the Stalingrad-Kalach railroad and are now engaged at 
Voroponovo 10 km west of Stalingrad. Our forces advancing from the 
northwest are about to merge with the forces coming up from the south. 
At Serafimovich the enemy succeeded in penetrating deeply into our lines. 
It was necessary to throw the 22nd Panzer Division into the gap. 

Central Army Group : 

Fighting flared up again south of Sukhinichi. East of Vyazma 
and in the Rzhev sector the enemy has resumed his attacks with great 
numbers of tanks and strong artillery. This battle is now going on with 
varying success. The enemy suffered heavy casualties. 

-27- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



2 Sen. 194? 



northern Amy Group ; 

Also south of Lake Ladoga, the enemy offensive remains un- 
checked. In some places there was f ierce /hand-to-hand fighting. On the 
Leningrad front the enemy attacked the L Army Corps with tanks and 
infantry, following a strong artillery barrage. All thrusts wore 
halted by counter-attacks. 



2. 



Finnish Front : 



Repeated attacks of small enemy detachments at the Aunus and 
Llaselskaya fronts v/ere repulsed. Enemy reinforcements on the Rybachi 
Peninsula indicate imminent attacks. A rather weak enemy landing 
attempt on the south shore of Motovski Bay was repulsed. 



3. 



North Africa: 



An enemy 



Very heavy enemy air attacks by day and night, 
counterattack against our attacking force was repulsed. On the northern 
front sector the enemy succeeded in temporarily penetrating into our 
position; the situation has already been restored. It must be expected 
that the enemy will be reinforced by at- least one division within to 
10 days after the arrival of the convoy which is to put into Sues early 
in September. 



B-1052 



2«t- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



3 Sep. 194 



o 



Items of Political Importance 

Spain : 

Franco has reorganized the Cabinet; the Foreign Minister Suner is 
leaving his post and, in a significant move, is relinquishing the 
presidency of the Falangist Political Committee to his brother-in-law 
Franco. The appointments of General Jordanas as Foreign Minister and 
of Ascensio as Army Minister are considered favorable from the German 
standpoint. The reorganization of the Cabinet is an indication of 
great domestic tension. Its direct cause was evidently the bitter 
conflict which has existed for a long time between extreme Falangists 
and the traditional right-wing groups of the country, which some time 
ago led to the attempt on the life of "War Minister Varela at Bilbao 
that cost many lives. Foreign policy probably plays no decisive role 
in the conflict at this stage. There can, however, be no doubt that 
the British are trying with all means to deepen the existing rift. 
When the question of Spain's participation in the war is considered, 
the precarious position of the government must, under all circumstances 
be taken into account. 

Japan ; 

The resignation of Togo, the last civilian minister of the Japanese 
Cabinet, was a purely personal matter, at least according to emphatic 
official st-atements. The government spokesman expressly stated that 
this resignation has no connection with the Russian situation nor with 
the creation of the new ministry. Foreign newspapers which point but 
that Togo's influence in the Cabinet has been decreasing more and more 
probably come closest to the real cause. For example, he was not 
notified of the attack on Pearl Harbor until hours after it had taken 
place. His resignation would thus tend to achieve greater solidarity 
and more singlemindedness within Japan's political leadership which 
is now completely in the hands of the military. 

Turkey ; 

Willkie is expected in Ankara on 4 Sep., where he will hand a message 
from Roosevelt to President Inonu. 

Italy ; 

So far, the Italian Government has not received a formal Brazilian 
declaration of war, either directly or Indirectly, and the Italian 
Government has therefore had no cause to take a stand. 

Argentina ; 

A report of the parliamentary investigating committee about the hear- 
ing of the First Officer of the GRAF SPEE in order to clarify the 
question of responsibility for the escape of a great number of the 
ship's crew will allegedly be made shortly. 

The Committee for Anti-Argentine Activities has ordered the arrest of 
an officer of the GRAF SPEE. 



-29- 8-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. 1942 

Special Items : 

I. On the occasion of the 4th anniversary of Britain's entry into 
the war, the London radio surveyed the last 12 months of the Battle 
of the Atlantic. It was pointed out that by 1 Sep. 1942 German sub- 
marines had regained about the same importance as they had a year ago; 
however, their chances of success have diminished due to improved de- 
fenses, and the number of new ships now surpass the number sunk. For 
a detailed report concerning this broadcast see the Naval Intelligence 
Division's publication Foreign Press (Naval Roports), No. 206, para- 
graph 2. 

The First Lord of the Admiralty announced with regard to the number of 
submarines destroyed that the months of July and August were the most 
successful of the war (which is unfortunately true). 

As regards the most important German warships, he had exact informa- 
tion on the present location and state of readiness of the TIRPITZ, 
SCHAHNHORST, GNEISENAU, PRINZ EUGEIT, SCIIEER, HIPPER, and LUETZOW. 

II. For a map showing the locations where German ships were damaged 
or lost due to enemy planes, mines, bombs, and submarines during 
August 1942 see 1/Skl 1 E 21667/42 Gkdos. in file "Own Ship Losses". 

III. According to available information, the effect of our mining op- 
erations on the British coast during the month of June was particular- 
ly poor, although more mines v»ere laid than in May and April. (577 
mines as compared to 319 and 273 respectively.) The enemy's very 
effective defense measures are probably responsible. 

An evaluation of the observations made, both with respect to the enemy 
count ermeasures and conclusions to be drawn, appears in 1/Skl I E 
20021/42 Gkdos. Copies nos. 59 and 60 are in V/ar Diary, Part C, Vol. 
VI. 

IV. On 29 Aug. the German Admiral at Tokyo had a conference upon re- 
quest of the Japanese Navy about fundamental problems of communica- 
tions. The fact that a document containing the distribution of the 
Japanese fleet was captured on the NANKIN has evidently created an im- 
pression of insufficient security of the Japanese communications 
system. The Japanese communications system is organized on the pattern 
of the British and American: crystal-controlled transmitters; only 
exchangeable code tables are used; radio operators, coding and main- 
tenance personnel are kept separate, each trained only for specific 
duty. Control station traffic unknown. The use of call letters 
causes concern. Would like to know about German cipher devices and 
experiences had with them. No confidence in mechanical coding de- 
vices. Two Enigma cipher machines available have never been used. We 
have promised to put them in condition and demonstrate their use. 

According to a report of the Chief of Communications Division, Naval 
Staff several Enigma machines are on the way to Japan and 3 code 
systems are being worked out. 

V. On 18 Aug. Group West submitted and expressed full approval of an 
analysis by the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, West about the ratio be- 
tween the forces available in his area and the demands currently made 
on them. 

The Commander in Chief, Navy has acknowledged that the demands of the 
Commanding Admiral, Defenses, West are basically justified. 



-zo- 






CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. 1942 

These demands are as follows: 

a. Permanent allocation of a torpedo boat flotilla {WOLF, I.10EV7E, 
or torpedo boat "37"). 

b. Ample allocation of motor trawlers. 

c. Reconditioning of foreign torpedo boats to serve as escort 
boats in the west area. 

d. Transfer of the fishing steamers of the 18th Mine Sweeper 
Flotilla to the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, West as soon as the 20th 
Mine Sweeper Flotilla has been commissioned. 

e. Increase of the shipyard capacity in the west area. 

The Chief of Operations Division, Naval Staff refers this matter to 
the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, Fleet Branch and requests com- 
pliance with points b to e as far as possible, if not already done. 

The allocation of the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla in addition to the 3rd 
Torpedo Boat Flotilla to Group West has been ordered by the Chief of 
Operations Division, Naval Staff. 

An additional modern mine sweeper flotilla is thus not being allocated 
at this moment to the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, West because it is 
impossible at present to withdraw a modern mine sweeper flotilla from 
the area of Group North. It should be investigated, however, whether 
it would not be possible to rush replacement of the auxiliary mine 
sweeper flotillas by up-to-date mine sweepers, which is now under way. 
(Delivery dates should be advanced or at least adhered to; the trial 
period should be shortened. ) 

VI. The Attache Section of the Naval High Command informed the 
Japanese Naval Attache on 31 Aug. that the German Navy gratefully ap- 
preciates the generous assistance rendered by the Japanese Navy to 
the common war effort by making available two planes; the German Navy 
has the sincere desire to reciprocate by declaring its willingness to 
defray all expenses for the sojourn, the required overhaul, and the 
equipment of the Japanese submarine "I 30". 

VII. The Naval Staff Communications and Intelligence Division dis- 
cusses the following in order to throw light on the enemy situation: 

a. The secret order by Stalin of 28 Jul. 1942. 

b. The probable behavior of the Russian fleet in the event that 
the German Army continues its advances and in the face of the imminent 
loss of their last remaining bases. 

For copy see 1/Skl 29916/42 geh. in War Diary, file "Barbarossa". 

VIII. A compilation of the enemy communications intercepted in the 
period from 24 Aug. to 30 Aug. 1942 by radio decoding and radio monit- 
oring is contained in Secret Radio Intelligence Report No. 35/42. 



-31- B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. 1942 

Situation 3 Sep. 1942 

I. War In Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

North Atlantic ; 

According to an intelligence report from Ponta Delgada, 1 
American and 2 British destroyers arrived there on 2 Sep. for a brief 
stay for replenishment. 

South Atlantic : 

According to a French communication to the German Armistice 
Commission, France the ships touching Freetown on the route from the 
Cape to Great Britain are temporarily released from the regulation to 
refuel at Capetown prior to proceeding to the British Isles, and they 
are to refuel at Freetown, if calling there. It was also declared 
preferable that ships sailing from the Cape to North America refuel at 
Freetown rather than in South America. 

Obviously the distribution of coal is beginning to 
cause difficulty. 

Indian Ocean ; 

The British tanker BRITISH GENIUS, which on 2 Sep. radioed 
sighting a submarine, was torpedoed 170 miles east of Aden on 3 Sep. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Ship "20 1 * reported at 1857 by short signal; 

n My position quadrant GZ 24. For overhauling will withdraw to quadrant 
HN 83 end of month." 

The Naval Staff acknowledged with Radiogram 2036 that ship "28" will 
withdraw from her present position in quadrant GZ 24 by the end of the 
month to quadrant HN 83 for overhaul. 

Information about the enemy situation transmitted by Radiogram 1608. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

As revealed by air reconnaissance, 2 large steamers, 15 other 
vessels, 3 landing boats, several patrol boats, and motor boats on 
various courses were in the Solent. Otherwise little shipping was ob- 
served off the Isle of Wight. 

2. Ov/n Situation ; 

Atlantic Coast ; 

One ground mine was swept off Lorient. Submarine U "256" 
which was damaged in the Bay of Biscay by enemy bombers was returned 
to Lorient under her own power. The damaged Italian submarine which 

-32- B ~ 1052 



( 



CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. 1942 

suffered considerable casualties anchored at Santander. Torpedo boat 
T "4 M arrived at Brest for engine repairs. 

Channel Coast : 

One ground mine was swept northeast of Dunkirk. 

3. Special Item : 

At noon of 2 Sep. the Armed Forces High Command announced 
that British prisoners of war taken during the engagement of Dieppe 
were to be laid in chains; this announcement was made on account of an 
enemy order captured on this occasion, according to which the hands of 
prisoners were to be tied to prevent them from destroying their papers, 
The British War Ministry lost no time to publish an announcement on 
the evening of 2 Sep. to the effect that an investigation was under 
way whether such an order actually had been issued. At the same time 
it vigorously denied that even a single German prisoner's hands had 
been tied and added that any such order, if it had been given, would 
be revoked. Owing to this announcement, the Armed Forces High Command 
cancelled the threatened steps toward the British prisoners. For the 
corresponding directive of the Armed Forces High Command, Operations 
Staff see 1/Skl 21707/42 Gkdos. in file "Enemy Landing at Dieppe on 19 
Aug. 1942". 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea t 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

North of Borkum, 1 ground mine was swept by a mine-sweeping 
plane and 2 by harbor patrol vessels. 

140 ground mines were swept during the month of August in the. area of 
the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North. 

2. Norway and Arctic Ocean : 
Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

Area of the Commanding Admiral, Norway : On 31 Aug. 
Russian batteries located on the Rybachi Peninsula fired on the harbor 
of Petsamo, on Trifona, and on Liinahamari without causing damage. 

On 1 Sep. enemy planes were active over the Arctic coast. Bombs were 
dropped on the convoy escorted by the light gun carrier GERMANIA off 
Vardoe. Convoy operations proceeded according to plan. 

Ship lifting gear was towed into Trondheim on 2 Sep. 

-33- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



3 Sep, 



Arctic Ocean : According to a report of the Port Commander, 
Vardoe, a rowboat with 4 survivors and 21 dead crow members of the 
mine-laying vessel ULM arrived there during the night of 2 Sep. The 
surviving first mate of the ULK stated that the mine layer was de- 
stroyed by British destroyers between Bear Island and Spitsbergen at 
2300 on 29 Aug. The Commanding Admiral, Group North welcomed the sur- 
vivors by Telegram 1720. 

Thus the concern which has been felt for days about the 
long silence of the ULM has unfortunately been justi- 
fied. Further details must still be clarified. In the 
first place, it is Incomprehensible how the ship 
happened to be at the reported place of her sinking on 
29 Aug., evidently after completing her mining mission. 
From the directive to withdraw given by the Admiral, 
Arctic Ocean, it would seem that the vessel would have 
proceeded northeast or east from Novaya Zemlya. It is 
noteworthy that air reconnaissance during these last few 
days did not see any trace of either the ULM or the 
enemy destroyers. 

The Admiral, Arctic Ocean reports the execution of mine-laying opera- \ 

tion "Peter" by submarine U "589" on 28 Aug.: 16 TKC mines were laid 
in the waters from the entrance to the Strait of ITatochkin east of 
54° E and south of 73° 23' N. 

Concerning operation "Doppelschlag", Group North orders that a full 
load consisting of 96 EMC mines be provided for the HIPPER, with which 
she is to lay barrages in the v/aters west of Yermak Bank along probablo 
or known shipping lanes. The boundary between the areas of mining 
operations of the HIPPER and the SCEEER is to be fixed at the dis- 
cretion of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean. The mines are to be set for 3m 
depth to explode after 60 days. 

The TIRPITZ is to be ordered to maintain a minimum degree of readiness 
for the duration of operation "Doppelschlag", so as not to interfere 
with her repair work. The submarines in the north area are to act as 
radio relay stations; they will relay important orders and communica- 
tions from land to the forces at sea throughout the mining operations 
"Zar", "Zarewitsch", "Romanow", and for operation "Doppelschlag". 

The Commanding Admiral, Cruisers reports in answer to the Group's dir- 
ective of 2 Sep. about the command of operation "Doppelschlag" that it t 
is Indispensable that he have command of the operation if two of his 
ships take part. He suggests that the captain of the HIPPER should 
take command in case the S CHEER does not participate In the operation. 

This proposal conforms fully with the opinion of the 
Naval Staff. 

However, Group North decides to keep the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers 
on board the TIRPITZ, since the TIRPITZ and her destroyer escort 
must be held in readiness to assist in operation "Doppelschlag" in 
case of an emergency, or to operate against the PQ convoy; in either 
case the TIRPITZ would doubtless be the center of action. 

The Naval Staff Is going to submit its dissenting view- 
point to the Commander in Chief, Navy upon his return 
from Dieppe. 



■7/1 B-1052 

-34- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. 1942 

The Commanding Admiral, Cruisers reports that the cruiser SCHEER is not 
capable of more than 25 knots prior to overhaul of her engines; she has 
exceeded her normal operating period and is thus liable to break down. 
This practically eliminates the SCKEER from participation in the under- 
taking. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Nothing to report from the area of the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea. 

In the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea bad weather has 
prevented work on the "Seeigel 1 * minefield and also mine-sweeping 
activities. Convoy service according to plan. 

Special Item ; 

In view of potential Russian internment plans for the Baltic fleet, 
Group North requested on 28 Aug. that as many submarines as possible 
be held in readiness as they become available for operations; these 
would be called in at short notice and would be posted between Apolda 
and the Swedish coast. They would be required only for a few days. 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines requested on 29 Aug. that this opera- 
tion not be carried out because it requires submarines of full combat 
readiness and because the date of the operation can by no means be 
determined. In his opinion, the planned operation could not be 
carried out within just a few days. Thus, the submarines would be kept 
from their principal task, the war against merchant shipping in the 
Atlantic, for a considerable time; this, however, could not be warranted 
by the results which might be achieved. 

The Naval Staff shares the viewpoint of the Commanding Admiral, Sub- 
marines and decides that the request of Group North cannot be granted 
for the tine being. The Naval Staff remarks that clear indications 
for Russian break-through plans would create a new situation requiring 
the commitment of all forces which could be mobilized. For copy see 
1/Skl 6080/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in V/ar Diary, Part C, Vol. III. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

According to the Naval Ordnance Division, V/ar Economy Branch, 
about the same quantities of iron ore as in the corresponding period of 
last year were shipped from Scandinavian ports for Germany's account 
from January to July 1942. The amount shipped on Sv/edish vessels rose 
from 52^ to 59^ while the amount on German, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, and 
Norwegian ships decreased cprrespondingly. 

From 1 Jan. to 17 Aug. 1942, 65,148 tons of Scandinavian iron ore were 
lost in transport, equal to lj$ of the tot/al quantity shipped. 



S- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. IS , 

VI. Submarine ..an are 

1. Enemy Situation : 

During the night of 2 Sep., the RAMILLIES sailed from Gibral- 
tar in a v/esterly direction under escort of 5 destroyers. In the 
southern rendezvous area 2 submarine sighting reports were intercepted, 
Reports about attacking submarines were heard from the St. Lawrence 
River and from the west entrance of the Strait of Belle Isle. 

2. Own Situation : 

The submarines U "517" and U "165" penetrated through the 
Strait of Belle Isle into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Submarine U "517" 
sank 2 steamers totalling 11,500 GRT in quadrant BB 2250 and has left 
again by way of the Strait of Belle Isle. Submarine U "165" entered 
the St. Lawrence River, but lost contact with a convoy previously ob- 
served. 

No reports of any successes were received from the submarines in the 
7,'est Indies, the South Atlantic, or the Mediterranean. Additional re- 
ports in Supolement to Submarine Situation, V. : ar Diary, Part B, Vol. 
IV. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

Fighter bombers raided localities on the southern coast dur- 
ing the day. 

During the night of 3 Sep. only 2 planes were reported over German 
territory, flying over the Baltic Sea into the area of Bromberg and 
Thorn without dropping bombs. In the entire west area there was 
little enemy air activity. 

2. Mediterranean Theater : 

Bomber planes supported the Panzer Army. Reconnaissance 
missions over the Mediterranean . 

3. Eastern Front: 



1D1 enemy planes were shot down at the various Army fronts. 
Reconnaissance missions over the waters of the Eastern Front revealed 
nothing of importance. 



VIII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean : 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, the RAMILLIES, 
escorted by 4 to 5 destroyers, sailed from Gibraltar during the night 
of 2 Sep. in westerly direction. (See Submarine Situation.) 



-36- 



CONFIDENTIAL 

3 Sep. 1942 

4 submarines were sighted off an Italian port of the central Medi- 
terranean. In the eastern Mediterranean, 3 cruisers and 6 destroyers 
were observed by Italian air reconnaissance approximately 75 miles 
north of Port Said on a westerly course, and 1 cruiser and 3 de- 
stroyers about 65 miles west of Haifa on a northeasterly course. 

Radio monitoring intercepted several reports from Alexandria-based 
planes about sighting and attacking steamers and convoys, and about a 
futile gunfire and torpedo attack of a British plane against an 
Italian hospital ship 60 miles north-northeast of Tobruk. 

According to an intelligence report from Haifa, a special task force 
of 16 submarines, some of them of a new type, arrived at Alexandria on 
1. Sep.; they are supposed to attack German and Italian transports. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

The Commanding Admiral, German Naval Command, Italy took 
over the North African command station at Marsa Matruh on 2 Sep. 
Enemy planes raided Tobruk during the nights of 1 and 2 Sep.; the 
harbor escaped damage. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

PADENNA, SP0RTIV0 and BIANCHI are en route from the Aegean 
Sea to Tobruk. 50 miles north-northwest of Tobruk, where this convoy 
should be according to dead reckoning, a German plane observed a 
burning vessel. No reports were received from the convoy thus far. 

The motor ship MONTI, en route from Naples to Cotrone was torpedoed 
during the night of 2 Sep. by an enemy plane and had to be beached in 
the morning at Punta Stilo. Other convoys proceeded according to plan. 

Goods unloaded at Tobruk on 1 Sep. amounted to 1,016 tons plus 756 
tons from tankers, and on 2 Sep., 733 tons plus- 300 tons from tankers. 
At Marsa Matruh, 638 tons were unloaded between the afternoon of 1 
Sep. and the forenoon of 2 Sep. 

4. Area Naval Group South ; 
Aegean Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

One submarine was reported in the Strait of Cerigotto on the 
forenoon of 2 Sep. 

Own Situation : 

Convoys in the Aegean Sea according to plan. 2 auxiliary 
sailing vessels with a cargo of anti-aircraft ammunition and medical 
supplies are en route from Crete to Africa. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

According to intelligence reports, 12 ships of the Black Sea 
fleet, including 4 cruisers, arrived at Potl from the north on 29 Aug. 
On 31 Aug. at 0040 six transports carrying wounded soldiers, war 
material, and special detachments sailed from Novorossisk in a southerly 
direction; on 1 Sep., 5 PT boats, 2 mine sweepers, and 2 transports 

B-1052 

-37- 



:::;r:r;z:-::^i 

3 Set. 1 

arrived at lover, a Sea of Azov. 

On 31 Aug., I aircraft carrier (?), 6 tankers, 1 heavy and 3 light 

cruisers, 9 submarines, and 5 transports arrived at Baturi. According 

to a report froo Anapa, 3 ai boats and 11 snail warships, all 

heading for raman, were observed ir. the early nor: f 2 Sep. 

ording to prisoner of war statements, the ?. :""..'."_'.- KOHUHA was 
badly iaj . probably by a nine, g the Kerch operation of 

December l~-4l. Tht s anchored at Poti until the er.d of hay. 
Z he cruiser VOHOSEILOV has beer, ready to sail since the end \y. 
Allegedly, not -ore than 3 or 4 destroyers are ready for action. 

Own Sit . : t irn ; 

I be first day of operation "Bluecher" went accoriirg to plan. 
Enemy naval forces were not encountered. Two landing barges .ere dan- 
aged, otherwise no losses were incurred. In the evening of 2 Sep. the 
secor.i wave embarked under unfavorable either conditions; it landed 

th full success on 3 Sep. at 0600. The eneny was taken completely by 
surprise. One Siebel ferry was badly damaged by enemy action; 1 land- 
ing barge, 1 Siebel ferry, 1 snail vessel, and approximately 40 en- 
gineer assault boat- e lost due to bad weather. Another landing 
barge and another Siebel ferry T.ere dara.ged by high seas. 6 Siebel 
ferries and 6 engineer laniing boats are temporarily out of action due 
to engine breakdowns. Casualties ai the personnel are low. Supply 
traffic was suspended temporarily on the evening of 2 Sep. by agree- 
ment with Corps Headquarters until the ■oaths r improves, in order to 
avoid further ship losses. Tuzla 2 it is firmly in C-err.an hands thanks 
to the assistance re. iered by a landing barge. The mine barrage off 
the Russian coast guard station at Ilich was swept by the 3rd l!otor 
Mire Sweeper Flotilla. A nee lot berth is being provided. The 
harbor of Kerch is being re ized as port of destination for our 

oply traffic. 

During the night of 2. Sep., the 1st 71 Flotilla under the command 
of Lt . Toennlges was a_ ed to provide flank protection for the Amy 
and to operate against enemy shirring s-uth o;' the raraan 7er.ir.sula. 
One 4,CC~ SRI tanker and 2 stear.ers totalling 4,50C JUT, : f then 
loaded with amnio . ..ere t and sunk. The 1st PT 3oat 
Flotilla has thus sunk a total of 34,50C 3IW since the beginning of the 
Caucasus offensive. 

The harbor of Yeisk has been cleared for supply tasks. Also the port 
Anapa is ready for use. 

Srecial Iter.: 

— i 

a. On 24 Aug. Naval Group South made an extensive analysis 
situation (see Op. Stab 6050/42 Skdos., 1/Skl 21104/42 C-kdos.) 
which explains and supplements directives given in the past in order 
to ensure a uniform conception on all points in the subordinate com- 
mands in the Black Sea area. The Commanding Admiral, 31ack ^ea is 
authorized, at his discretion, to supplement the Group's analysis by 
additional directives or comments to the cor_~.ar.is under his authority. 
Moreover, the above anlysis is to serve as a basis for conferences of na- 
val liaison officers wit . the ities of the Army and «ir horce. 

Copies of the analysis of the situati: re transmitted to the "aval 
Staff Operations Division, and to the Vaval St . ;artermaster Di- 
vision. 



" 5e ~ 6-1052 



9 



CONFIDENTIAL 
3 Sep. 1942 

The Naval Staff Operations Division agrees completely 
with the ideas expressed therein. The Group's con- 
clusions concerning the connections between these 3 
problems are particularly appropriate. Turkey's treat- 
ment of the question of the Russian Black Sea fleet; 
the Turkish attitude during the future course of the 
war; possession of the Suez Canal- area. The present 
tasks with regard to measures to be taken against the 
Black Sea fleet, when the latter is being threatened 
with the loss of the last remaining bases, illustrate 
vividly that the Black Sea, the Dardanelles, the Aegean 
Sea, and the eastern Mediterranean are dependent on 
each other strategically and politically to such a 
degree that the decision about a final clear-cut 
sovereignty over them can only be solved for all of 
these areas simultaneously. The key to the solution of 
this problem is Suez. 

b. With reference to a communication from the Naval Liaison 
Officer to the Army High Command concerning the organization of Sev- 
astopol as transshipping port for Army supplies, Naval Group, South 
points out that the Navy has gone ahead with this project, in spite of 
the Army's indecision. Before the harbor can be used it must be swept 
of mines, and crane equipment must be brought up from the naval ship- 
yard at Nikolayev. A Sea Transport office ready to start functioning 
is already established at Sevastopol, and pier space for medium sized 
vessels is already available. (See Telegram 1725.) 



IX. Situation East Asia 



Nothing to report. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

The 46th Infantry Division completed the occupation of the 
peninsula north of Taman Bay including the point, and is now advancing 
to the south. Rumanian forces are advancing north of the lagoon of 
Kiziltash. The bulk of the Rumanian Corps and units of the V Army 
Corps are attacking Novorossisk. On the Terek River the bridgehead 
northwest and west of ttozdok was widened. The town of Kizlyar was 
mopped up. 

Army Group B: 

The area north of Chalchutea was cleared of the enemy. Tne 
4th Panzer Army repulsed a flank attack so.uth of Stalingrad. The tank 
forces which crossed the railroad line Stalingrad-Kalach and are ad- 
vancing in the direction of Stalingrad broke through the enemy posi- 
tions and are directly west of the city. Also infantry of the LI Army 
Corps advancing from the north and northwest are just about to unite 
with our tank spearheads. An attack by 150 tanks from Stalingrad to the 
north was repulsed with heavy enemy losses. 

-39- 

8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



3 Sep. 1942 



Central Army Group : 

See-saw fighting on the Zhizdra River continues. Also east 
of Vyazma and in the area of Rzhev the enemy is still on the offensive, 
However, we succeeded in keeping the situation in hand. In the rear 
of the Army Group's left wing, partisan bands are again increasingly 
active.- Cases of destruction of railroad beds and rolling stock are 
increasing. 

Northern Army Grou p: 

Enemy attacks at the same battle areas continue. An enemy 
attack across the Neva River was repulsed. The enemy was also unable 
to gain any ground south of Leningrad. 

2. Fi nnish Front : 

Increased enemy reconnaissance activity is reported from the 
area of the Rvbachi Peninsula and at the Litsa front. 



3. 



North Africa: 



On 3 Sep. enemy reconnaissance detachments very cautiously 
felt their way tov/ard our motorized group. On the other hand, enemy 
air attacks on this group continue in undiminished strength by day and 
night. Normal enemy reconnaissance and artillery fire in front of our 
fortified positions. Aerial photo reconnaissance revealed more than 
300 tanks in the area of the 1st enemy tank division. 

The situation report shows already that our offensive 
has hit a snag. We must av/ait further developments. 



-40- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain : 

The analysis of the naval situation by the First Lord of the Admiralty 
on the occasion of the anniversary of the war (see War Diary of 3 Sep.) 
touched not only on the state of submarine warfare, as already re- 
ported; it refers briefly also to the situation of the German heavy 
battleships and the Malta situation and then goes into detail about 
the problems of British and American shipbuilding. See Political Re- 
view No. 207, paragraph 1 and the appendix of the Naval Staff Intelli- 
gence Division's Foreign Press Analysis No. 207. 

India ; 

In his radio address to the Indian nation, General V/avell remarked 
among other things that the 4th year of the war began with much better 
prospects for the Allies than the year 1918. "At that time the German 
forces were available to be used in the west following the victory over 
Russia, whereas today our Russian allies are pressing then hard. Today, 
the Germans and not the Allies must carry the burden of Italy, and war 
production in the U.S.A. is in full swing already." Finally, V/avell 
termed the Indian soldiers fighting on all fronts the true representa- 
tives of India; they are the ones who matter and not the politicians 
entangled in domestic quarrel, nor the undisciplined youth and ir- 
responsible rowdies. . 

Spain : 

Political Review Nc. 207, paragraphs 2a and b, contains further com- 
ments regarding the cabinet reorganization and sketches a picture of 
Spanish/Anglo-American relations. According to the opinion pre- 
dominating in London, Spain will remain neutral, at least while Suez 
is in British hands. The British are convinced that Franco desires to 
keep his country out of the war in spite of his pro-Axis sympathies and 
that Brazil's entry into the war had a sobering effect on the Axis 
sympathizers in Spain, because this fact seems to indicate that the 
largest South American country no longer believes in an Axis victory. 

The British carefully avoid mentioning Spain's domestic 
weakness, evidently in order not to show that they have 
had a part In it. 

U.S.A. : 

Roosevelt's address at the International Youth Congress contained 
nothing worth mentioning. 

Reuter reports the arrival of U.S. troops in the Belgian Congo. 



Conference on the Situation with the Chief, Naval Staff 

I. The Chief of the Operations Branch, Naval Staff Operations Di- 
vision reports about the loss of the mine-laying vessel ULM as recorded 
under Situation Arctic Ocean. 

Rear Admiral Klueber took over the command as Admiral, Arctic Ocean. 



B- 



B-1052 



C0NFIDEI7TIAI 
4 Sep. 1 

II. Z'r.c- If -•..:-.- : :..-. -. ;" , . -. _ : ^.uarterrast er Division re- 
ports : 

(a) The Reich [ ritice Shipping has taken over 
shipping also in 1 . as of 1 Sep. 

(b) Comply!:, -rder tc transfer car^o space 
from the Kavy to th Zonal r :f "aritime Shipping, 46 ships 
which are in reel shape, t - 111] 1 ,30 GHT, and 12 ships under re- 

r, totalling 55, (X , e transferred to date. An addi- 
ti ral 62 ships of 05, the ships in the Norwegian 

supply traffic, are e Cer. The total number of shins 

involved is therefore 120, tot llj 315,276 GRT or 441,000 register" 
tons. 

The Commander ir. y orders that a confirnation be requested 

fron the Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shlppin ;, acknowledging that 
all his demands have beer met t tie fullest extent. 

(c) The transport of suhnarinea and landing barges to the Black 
Sea by way of the Danube is being iel - bj the low water level at 
Ingolstadt due to d: : . 



*ii- 



III. The Chief, Haval Staff expects the .uarterraster Division's re- 
port on the progress made in reinforcing the defenses of the Geman 
river estuaries Ir. the German Bight; these reinforcements were supposed 
to be completed by 1 Sep. 

During the inspection at Dieppe, the Chief, Haval Staff was informed 
about the great tension existing between the Arm; Bind the r con- 
cerning the emplacement of Army coastal batteries. Army artillery- 
r.en adhere to their ingrained views cased I fighting, and can- 
not be convinced of the changes required for : atting targets at sea. 

Fuehrer plans an early conference with all authc: serned 
with the coastal defense of the west area. 

The Chief, Haval Staff announces further that the Commanding Admii al, 

France is going to propose the creation of a vd iett 
naval installations in France, because the Amy is no longer in a 
position to attend to this task. The Recruitment Division, au.of 
Naval Administration is directed to examine this natter. 

IV. The Chief, Haval Ordnance Division renorts: 

i ' . . . - 

(a^ Vith the exception of the alreac" gleted IC - : . , the U.S. 
Navy has temporarily suspended further work :r. the remaining battle- 
ships of the sar.e class in order to await the experiences from the 
operations in the Pacific. It is remarkable that, while the dis- 
placement of the IOttA was increased by 10,000 tons compared to original 
plans, the original srmament, including the gun caliber, was not 

rred. The increased tonnage thus benefitted solely the speed or the 
range and the armor protection. 

(b) With regard to the proposition of the Chief, Naval Staff 
Quart ermaster Division concerning the Ilich works at Mariupol, it must 
ce said that extensive conversion would be required before the plant 
could be used for the proposed purpose. However, the plant has since 
been taken over by Krupp for the manufacture of Army projectiles. 

V. The Deputy to the Chief of Operations Branch, Naval Staff Opera- 
tions Division re;;r:s a'r cut the l:rs--:s sustained by enemy merchant 
shipping during the month of August as verified by -the Naval In t e llig ence 

ihJ B-1052 



♦ 



• 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

Division, Foreign Merchant Marine Branch: 

Total loss: 247 ships of 1,087,529 GRT 

German submarines sank 107 of these ships with a total of 542,398 GRT. 
The Japanese sank 40 vessels with a total of 235,165 GRT. 

Verified total enemy losses from the beginning of the war up to 31 Aug. 
1942 reach the sum of 21,007,539 GRT. 

For the report of the Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign Merchant 
Marine Branch see the appendix to 3/Skl FH (c) 16015 g in file "Ship 
Losses". 

The Chief, Naval Staff states in connection with the 
above figures that the goal set by the Navy has more or 
less been achieved for the moment. 

VI. The Chief, Naval Staff orders that the great number of enemy land- 
ing craft of different types captured at Dieppe are to be thoroughly 
examined and their practical value established. 

The matter is referred to the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division. 

In a Very Restricted Circle : 

VII. The Chief of Operations Branph, Naval Staff Operations Division 
reports : 

(a) Concerning Group North's directive for operation "Doppel- 
schlag", as reported in War Diary of 2 and 3 Sep.: 

The Chief, Naval Staff agrees with the proposal of the Commanding Ad- 
miral, Cruisers, with respect to command over the latter' s forces. But 
since the Commanding Admiral, Group North would be placed in an awkward 
position were he required to revoke his own order — which he upheld 
against the protest of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers--the Chief, Na- 
val Staff merely orders the Chief of Staff, Naval Staff to inform the 
Commanding Admiral, Group North that it would be contrary to his re- 
peatedly expressed opinion for a ship commander to function simultaneous- 
ly as task force commander. . 

(b) Concerning the report of 2 Sep. of the Permanent Representa- 
tive of the Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters with 
regard to the analysis of the situation and the plans for the Eastern 
Front (see War Diary, file "Barbarossa") : 

A certain shortage of forces in the Army and Air Force which is becoming 
evident at this long front prohibits the. execution of several major 
operations simultaneously. This means that probably only a fraction of 
the operations planned can be executed during the remainder of this 
year. A cancellation of the offensive toward Kandalaksha and the un- 
certainty about the seizure of Leningrad are matters of importance for 
the Navy. * 



Special Items : 

I. The Foreign Office transmits a report of 2 Sep. from the Military 
-Attache at Bangkok, based on Information from the Japanese India 



a. 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

Bureau; according to this report, the General Staff at Tokyo announced 
that no decision has yet been reached as to the dates and sequence of 
the operations against Russia, India, and Australia which are in prep- 
aration. 

The following represents the personal view of Lt . Col. Maki, Chief of 
the India Bureau: 

(1) Japan will not attack Russia this coming fall. An attack 
after Russia has been defeated in Europe is possible, provided it in- 
volves no risks. 

(2) The India campaign will take place this year, when the mon- 
soon period ends. The army for this offensive is being trained in 
Manchuria at this moment. The Japanese expect that the German ad- 
vance toward Suez and the Middle East will cause an anti -British up- 
rising of the Mohammedans, which would facilitate the Japanese opera- 
tions. The date for the Japanese undertaking depends on this move. 

(3) The operation against Australia is postponed for the time 
being. It is assumed that northeast Australia and the islands to the 
east will be seized at a later date. 

The Gei*man Ambassador and the Military Attache at Bangkok consider 
Maki ' s analysis essentially correct and assume that the former 
Philippine divisions will form the invasion army for India under the 
command of Yamashita. 

For this telegram see 1/Skl 1728/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. 
XV. . 6 arguments in confirmation of the view expressed in paragraph 1 
are included. 

II. As reported on 3 Sep. by the German Admiral at Tokyo, Kojima sent 
word that about 1/3 of the submarines operating in the Indian Ocean 
have been transferred to the area of the Solomon Islands in view of 
the developments there. 

This report has been communicated to the Permanent Representative of 
the Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters, to the Naval 
Representative of the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff, and 
to the Navy Liaison Officers to the Army High Command and the Commander 
in Chief, Air Force. 

III. The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, Fleet Branch reported on 
2 Sep. about the tentative shipyard schedule of the following ships: 

TIRPITZ: In active service in the north area. She is to be 

overhauled at the Deutsche Y.'erke, Kiel, from end of 
October 1942 to January 1943. There is some diffi- 
culty with regard to the dock problem, because the 
GRAF ZEPPELIN might be in Kiel at the same time. 

SCHARNHORST: Repairs concluded on 15 Aug. At the moment in 

training. From 1 to 3 Oct. she is to participate in 
tactical maneuvers of the fleet. Will be ready for 
operations early in October. 

In Gdynia in need of repair. 



_44- ^i" 52 



4 Sep. 1942 



CONFIDENTIAL 



HIPPER : 

PRINZ EUGEN: 
ADMIRAL S CHEER: 

LUETZOW: 



NUERNBERG : 



KOELN : 



Operating in north area. To enter the Deutsche 
V/erke in Kiel following the TIRPITZ, beginning 
approximately early in Feb. 1943. 

Shipyard period scheduled to end on 15 Oct. 1942. 
Subsequently training. 

For the time being on operations in north area. To 
be fitted with new electric motors (Diesel) after 1 
Feb. 1943. Expected to take 3^ months approximately. 

Structural repairs at Deutsche Werke, Kiel, to last 
until latter half of October. Subsequently training 
and assignment to Naval Gunnery School from Ik! Nov. 
to 15 Dec. 1942. Thereafter available for north 
area. Replacement of electric motors and of 28 cm 
gun barrels planned for May 1943, lasting 3^ months 
approximately. 

Left the shipyard middle of August. At the moment in 
training till early October. Scheduled for partici- 
pation in tactical maneuvers of the fleet. 

At present in north area. Requires about 4 months 
in shipyard for repair of cables, thus restoring 
full combat readiness. Cannot be accommodated in 
German shipyards during the winter. Ship must get 
along without repairs for the moment. Since due to 
stability reasons her range is limited (oil con- 
sumption), an examination is under way regarding 
possibility of continued operations. 

In training with the Naval Inspectorates. Scheduled 
for participation in fleet maneuvers from 1 to 3 
Oct. To enter the shipyard probably in the spring 
of 1943. From 5 Nov. to 15 Dec. assigned to Naval 
Gunnery School. 

Systematic overhaul at Wilhelmshaven shipyard from 
15 Aug. to about 31 Oct. On this occasion replace- 
ment of armament and installation of experimental 
degaussing gear. After 1 Oct. 1942 to be used for 
training of naval cadets. 

IV. With reference to Group North's objection to the security regula- 
tions for the transfer of ship "45" to the west area in view of the 
presence of Blohm personnel on board, the Naval Staff requests an ex- 
amination whether the latter' s presence is necessary. If so, the 
camouflage order will be changed to call for returning to Bremen or 
Wilhelmshaven for the alleged purpose of Installing some special de- 
vice for an operation in the North. 



LEIPZIG: 



EMDEN : 



Situation 4 Sep. 1942 
I. War in Foreign Waters 
1. Enemy Situation ; 
North Atlantic: 



According to press reports, the U.S. Navy Department plans 



-45- 



B-1052 



. .-. _ 



4 Sep. 1. 

to transfer several ships, i.e., 2 battle, , 2 ai t carriers, 
and S others of t E "_ • I a Pacific Ocean. 

South Atlantic : 

aluation of information obtained by the radio decoding and 
intercept services shows the foil L b tract ions for er.er.p shit ting 
in the South Atlantic, amending r::e ertensivs instructions which we 
do nc a: 

(1) Vestel? sailing In r lirection between the British 

Isles and African ports as well as between South African and West 

Lng ships ahJ :v= separated from OS : r.voys, 
to ::llov." a c pas 500 miles off the African coast between -ate- 
town and 03° 00' S, thence between the coast and a line through the 
following points: 



a. 


03° CO' 


s 


:: : 


50 ' 


z 


b. 


^.tuator 




:: : 


:: " 


V.' 


c. 


:: : 30' 


s 


07° 


5C ' 


v; 


d. 


Equat : r 






:: • 


■ 


e. 


05° 00' 


:: 




:: • 


■ 


f. 


10° 00 » 


:: 


26° 


:: • 


B 



.ps runni: tweer. est r.r ar.d Beat Indies ports are to follow 
these Instructions between points a. and e. 

(2) Ships sailing Ln either direction between West Indies and 
South ^:ri;ar. torts r.ust >eer south and seat of: 

a. (A line ?) between 33° 00' S, 10° 00' S and 17° 3C ' S, 22°~C'W. 

b. A line between 17- ^, 2i W and St. Paul's Hock. 

(3) Southbou- ips between aaaarican East Coast) and South 
American pcrts are to sail I etween ICO ar.i 2CC -lies east of (St. Paul's) 
Rock; northbound ships are :: sail : CZ and 300 niles east :: 
(St. Paul's) Rock. 

(4) Ships in betweer. the rritish Isles and West 
African as well as South Ar.eri trts farther south than Cape San 
Roque are to sail as outlined under (3) and west of 07° 00' S, :5° 

00» W. 

(5) Betweer. African and South n ports ships are to follow 
the direct route. 

The Haval Staff adds the following consents: 

Shirring has been : :r cent ra: e _ ir.t: narrc - . lar.e s alt.rg the ^:"ri:ar 
coast due to the operations of our auxiliary :r_lsers. 

The points ■ t] Ml as the eastern liri - : : t the traffic lanes in the 
western South Atlantic are probably specially patrolled. 

Paragraph (4) nay mean that ships between the British Isles and South 
American ports should proceed according to par ! , ar.i ships 
between West African and South American p:rts west of 07° 00' S and 
25° 00' W. Parag. ^4) has not definitely been corroborated by 
sailing instructions intercepted thus far. 

It car. :e assumed that the waters between St. Paul's Rock to a point 
200 miles east of it are also hea lip _lei. 

-45- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

The Naval Attache at Buenos Aires reported on 29 Aug. that meat -carrying 
vessels are sailing to the British Isles mostly via Freetown, other 
steamers either via Freetown or Port of Spain. Motor vessels and coal- 
burning ships usually call at Port of Spain. 

Indian Ocean : 

On 2 Sep. the German Consulate General at Lourenco Marques 
submitted an agent report, according to which a U.S. convoy with troops 
and material passed there. Another convoy of 15 vessels for Iran left 
Capetown, where a third convoy from the U.S.A. was expected. A total 
of 10 American ships are scheduled to pick up manganese at Lourenco 
Marques and Durban. The Americans intend to station as many as 500,000 
men in South Africa, which is to become the base of operations directed 
toward Australia, India and the Middle East. 5 or 6 light cruisers 
left the Mediterranean via Suez. Greek port and shipping authorities 
were shifted from Alexandria to Mombasa. 

Special Item : 

According to a French communication to the German Armistice Commission, 
France, a burning British bomber plane crashed at Mogador on the morn- 
ing of 2 Sep., apparently after being fired at. At 0730 a flight of 
French fighters had a brush with 3 British bombers 20 km west of Casa- 
blanca. 1 Curtiss was shot down. 

These incidents prove that French resistance against the crossing of 
French territory has intensified. 

2, Own Situation : k 

The Naval Staff informed the Attache at Tokyo with Telegram 
2355 that the CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN with 104 prisoners would arrive at 
point "Rose" around 24 Sep. and that the TANNENFELS completed the de- 
livery of supplies to ship "10" on 30 Aug. according to plan. 

3y Radiograms 0640 and 1124 all ships in foreign waters are informed 
about the enemy shipping instructions for the South Atlantic as re- 
corded under Enemy Situation. 

Additional information about the enemy situation by Radiograms 0400 and 
2058. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance observed only normal shipping in the 
Channel. 

Between 24 and 28 Aug. all Important ports on the south coast east of the 
mouth of the Axe River were covered by surprise photo reconnaissance. 
The photographs show that the concentrations pf small craft suitable for 
landing purposes are still centered between Poole and Selsey Bill. The 
3rd Air Force comments on the result as follows: 

a. Since no photographs were taken of the area west of the Axe 
estuary, the total number (3,296) of small craft established on the 
English south coast including the southern pari -of- the Thames River 



-47- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

estuary between 24 and 28 Aug. does not present a complete picture. 
By baaing our estimate on the figure for 28 to 30 Jul. for the 
western Channel (1,543),. it can be assumed that the total number of 
small craft suitable for landings, now in ports of the southern coast 
inclusive of the southern part of the Thames estuary, approximates 
5,000. 

b. Due to the fact that the center of concentration is clearly 
the area Poole-Chichester-Southampton, we can continue to assume that 
potential landing operations would be launched and large-scale opera- 
tions could also be fed from there. 

c. The possibility of large-scale landing operations certainly 
exists, judging from the types of vessels established by photo recon- 
naissance and by the experiences gained from the Dieppe operation. 

For copy of the corresponding report from Group West see 1/Skl 21707/ 
42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. lib. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast ; 

The Biscayan tuna-fishermen are beginning to go over to net 
fishing because of renewed British threats and because the tunafish 
are migrating north. 1 mine was swept at the mouth of the Gironde. 

Channel Coast : 

The Alderney Harbor Defense Group established that the 7 
man crew of the Casquets lighthouse and radio beacon was probably 
captured by the enemy. The radio station is destroyed, but signs of 
a struggle are not visible. This may have a connection with the 
sailboat destroyed by the 3rd Fighter Command on 2 Sep. Further in- 
vestigation of the matter was ordered. (See Telegram 2115.) 

The 2nd, 4th, and 5th PT Boat Flotillas are scheduled to lay mines 
the night of 4 Sep. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reports only slight traffic off the 
Humber and in the Thames estuary. 

Own Situation : 

During the night of 3 Sep. enemy planes dropped bombs over 
the Emden area. North of Borkum, 1 ground mine was swept by a mine- 
exploding vessel. Channel-sweeping had to be partly cancelled due to 
bad weather. 

The Group supports the proposal of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, 
North made to the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division concerning re- 
placement of the 6 mine-exploding vessels which were lost, and points 
out that the mine situation in the North Sea cannot be controlled in 



-4Q- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 

4 Sep. 1942 

the long run If the British ground mine offensive continues. As an 
emergency measure, one mine-exploding vessel was transferred from the 
Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea to the Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, North. (See Telegram 1249.) 

This proposal is in keeping with the policy already 
followed for a long time by the Naval Staff. 

Group North further requests the Naval Staff to supply definite in- 
formation about the deliveries of mine-exploding vessels, mine- 
sweeping vessels and mine-sweeping planes which may be expected dur- 
ing September and up to November. (See Telegram 1246.) 

The Chief, Naval Staff will give his opinion. 

2. , Norway : 

Convoy operations suffered somewhat from bad weather. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway renews his request for permission to 
lay an EMF minefield between Skraaven and Flatoe in the Vest Fjord, 
at 2 meters depth, since EMF mines have been declared ready for op- 
erational use. The original request was denied by Group North in 
March 1942. (See Telegram 2015.) 

3. Arctic Ocean t 

Enemy Situation : 

According to a Danish intelligence report, a convoy con- 
sisting of approximately 10 steamers sailed from Reykjavik on 31 Aug. 
for an unknown destination. 

Own Situation : 

According to a report of Group North, the mine-laying ship 
ULM sank as early as 25 Aug. at 2300. The date given as 29 Aug. was 
caused by an error in transmission. When the ULM encountered 3 
British destroyers on her scheduled approach route "Zar" northeast of 
Bear Island, her captain gave order to scuttle and abandon the ship 
in view of her hopeless situation after the enemy had begun to fire 
from a great distance. Mines had not been laid. One of the British 
destroyers remained at the spot of the sinking for quite some time. 
It was not observed whether prisoners were taken. The British de- 
stroyer paid no attention to a passing crowded cutter. Another 
cutter capsized. All 3 enemy destroyers fired with machine guns on 
the fast-sinking ULM and on the life boats as they were being lowered, 
according to statements of First Mate Bonn. 

An additional report must be awaited. The 3 destroyers 
evidently concerned were sighted by our air reconnais- 
sance and by submarines on 26 Aug. after 0945 in quad- 
rant AB 3855 (see War Diary of 26 Aug.). The ULM was 
the unfortunate victim of a chance patrol run of 
light enemy forces. 

5 ships of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla sailed from Alta Fjord to 
Kirkenes on a mine-laying mission. 

Concerning the blockade of Murmansk : 

With reference to the Naval Staff's directive concerning mine-laying 



-49- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIA L 
4 Sep. 1942 

operations in the Arctic Ocean during the coming winter (see War Diary 
8 Aug.), Group North remarks that it is impossible to cut the supply 
route to Murmansk even by the most extravagant use of mines; the 
reason being that enemy mine-sweeping operations can neither be pre- 
vented nor disturbed, that coastal traffic close to the shore of Kola 
Peninsula cannot be attacked and, finally, because only very few of 
the enemy defense installations are known. The Group can at best 
harass enemy shipping in Murmansk, and therefore proposes to lay a 
minefield from quadrant AC 0589 via 8917 to 8972 to connect with the 
minefield "Bantos A w . It is planned to make further additions out 
at sea and later as far as quadrant 8980. A further minefield with 
timing devices should be laid from quadrant AC 8581 to 8813 in view 
of minefield "V/iesengrund". Between these two minefields, mines 
should be laid by motor mine sv/eepers and PT boats, because the Group 
figures that there are enemy barrages in this areas so that destroyers 
could not be used there. Moreover, the Group proposes laying aerial 
mines in the port of Vladimir, in the Polyarnoye Bay, the Kildin 
Strait, the inner Murmansk Bay, the Volokovaya 3ay and the Tyuva Bay. 
Aerial mines might also be laid in tho approaches to Iokanga Bay,. 
Teriberski Bay, Podzakhata Bay and Rynda Bay. Moored mine barrages 
should be considered also between Kola Bay and the entrance to the 
White Sea. The Navy requires about 800 to 1000 large mines and the 
same number for additions to existing minefields. 

The destroyers, the K0ELN, and possibly after the end of October also 
the NUERNBERG, 3RUMMER, and OSTI.'ARK are intended for use as mine 
carriers. The Group, summarizing the situation, points out that even 
the most extensive use of mines will bring occasional successes only 
and no lasting effect can be expected from them. If it is absolutely 
necessary we could stay out of the waters south of 70° 12' N between 
32° 20' E and 36° 00' E, but the submarine operations against convoys 
would be badly affected. The Group suggests that the Army be told 
now that it is impossible to cut off sea supplies to Murmansk com- 
pletely, so that the Army will not have the wrong impression and will 
not make false plans. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Nothing to report from the area of the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea. 

In the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea, an unsuccess- 
ful submarine attack was made on a German convoy west of Porkkala. A 
submarine alarm was caused southwest of Utoe by an underwater explo- 
sion, probably from a ground runner. In the Aland Sea a Finnish con- 
voy was unsuccessfully attacked by a submarine. 

The Armed Forces High Command is informed by letter 1/Skl I op 
21693/42 Gkdos. about the Fuehrer's decision with regard to the report 
of the Commander in Chief, Navy of 26 Aug. In his decision the Fuehrer 
accepted the Navy's viewpoint that the Leningrad shipyards be spared. 
Copy of letter in file "Barbarossa". 



V. Merchant Shipping 

An American periodical surveys the problem of U.S. cargo space. 

-50- B-1052 



confidential 

4 Sep. 1942 

The Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign Merchant Marine Branch made 
an abstract of the most interesting parts of the article, which 
mostly consists of a very expert analysis of the present situation; 
otherwise, its statements indicate the same difficulties, which to 
some extent probably exist in all belligerent countries with regard 
to merchant shipping. The abstract is contained in short report No. 
28/42 of the Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign Merchant Marine 
Branch. 

According to press reports, a shipyard on the U.S. Pacific coast has 
completed a 10,500 ton Liberty freighter within the record time of 
31 days from keel-laying to final delivery. Another report has it 
that U.S. shipyards delivered steamers and tankers totalling 753,000 
tons (probably weight tons) during the month of August, after delivery 
in July of 71 vessels totalling 790,300 tons. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Submarine U "456" of the Norwegian group is supposed to 
arrive at 1600 on 6 Sep. at^ 70° N,46° E for a mining mission of the 
5th Destroyer Flotilla. 

No reports about any achievements were received from the North Atlan- 
tic and from the American East Coast. 

Submarine U "125" from the South Atlantic group reports sinking a 
coastal steamer of 820 GRT south of the Gold Coast in quadrant EV 
8123. This sinking caused strong air patrol activity. 

Submarine U "205" torpedoed a destroyer off Jaffa in the Mediterranean. 

Additional reports in Supplement to Submarine Situation, War Diary, 
Part B, Vol. IV. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

Fighter bomber and reconnaissance missions were carried out 
over several localities in southern England during the day. For de- 
tails see daily situation report. During the night of 4 Sep. propa- 
ganda material was dropped over Southampton and Portsmouth. 

2. Enemy Incursions : 

150 out of 176 enemy planes flew into German territory; 50 
came from the east and 100 from the west. 10 of them were shot down 
by fighters. The raids in the east were carried out in an area ex- 
tending from Libau to Elbing, Kutno, Lodz, and Bratislava; Vienna and 
Budapest were also raided. For details see daily situation report. 



-51- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

3. Mediterranean Theater ; 

Our planes supported the Africa Corps and at night made 
severe attacks on enemy tank and troop concentrations on the northern 
sector of the Egyptian front. 

4. Eastern Front ; 

81 enemy planes were shot down at the Army fronts. Recon- 
naissance activity over the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea, and Lake 
Ladoga revealed nothing of importance. 

5. Special Item ; 

The Air Force Operations Staff amended its previous order 
and directed that the first two mine-sweeping planes delivered from 
the new production are to be transferred into the Kerch area for 
temporary use by the 4th Air Force. 



VIII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

On 3 Sep., 2 destroyers arrived in Gibraltar and 1 trans- 
port was towed into the Atlantic. Otherwise nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

Tobruk had an air raid, during the night of 3 Sep. 

8 boats of the 7th PT Boat Flotilla will start from Rotterdam on 10 
Sep. for transfer to the Mediterranean via the Rhine-Rhone Canal. 

The German Naval Command, Italy submits the reply of the Italian High 
Command to the stand of the Armed Forces High Command, Operations 
Staff in the matter of closing the Strait of Sicily (see War Diary of 
11 Aug.). For a copy of the telegram see 1/Skl 21775/42 Gkdos. in Wait 
Diary, Part C, Vol. XIII. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

In the evening and during the night of 3 Sep., a convoy 
consisting of the PADENNA, the BIANCHI, and the SPORTIVO was attacked 
by enemy planes. The PADENNA and the BIANCHI were set afire and had 
to be abandoned. The BIANCHI sank 40 miles north of Tobruk, while 
the SPORTIVO reached Tobruk. The damaged steamer ABRUZZI was towed 
into Ras el Hilal on 3 Sep. where attempts are being made to unload 
her cargo. 1 landing barge sank en route from Derna to Crete due to 
damage caused by bad weather. 

Otherwise ^ convoy operations proceeded according to plan. 

Goods unloaded at Tobruk on 3 Sep. amounted to 977 tons, plus 293 tons 1 
from tankers. 



B-1052 

^52- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



4 Sep. 1942 

Volume of Maritime Shipping during Augu st 1942 1 
From Italy to Africa: 



From Aegean Sea to Africa: 



16,194.9 tons of armed forces 
supplies 
865 vehicles 
709 men 

1,545 tons of armed forces 
supplies 
152 vehicles 
697 men 



Total 17,759.9 tons of armed forces 

supplies 
1,017 vehicles 
1,406 men 

In addition to the above figures, 7,742 tons of armed forces supplies, 
425 vehicles and 3 men were lost with the following vessels: M0NVTS0* 
LERICI, PILO, CAMPEIRO, ISTRIA, BIXIO, DIELPI, and the tanker SAN 
ANDREA. 

13,115 men and 1,115 tons of materiel were transported to North Africa 
by air. 

This achievement must be regarded as entirely inade- 
quate as far as armed forces supplies, including fuel, 
are concerned, in view of the resumption of our offen- 
sive which had been planned for the end of August. 



4. 



on 2 Sep. 



Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Heavy gunfire was directed against Yenikale and Tuzla Spit 

Own Situation: 



In spite of bad weather, the 3rd Motor Mine Sweeper Flo- 
tilla marked the channel to the new landing place at the Ilich coast 
guard station with buoys. 22 Russian inertia contact mines and 1 lead 
horned mine were detonated at the Dolgaya Spit. Drifting mines still 
constitute a menace to shipping. Shipments to Yeisk were postponed 
owing to weather conditions, and for the same reason neither PT boats 
nor Italian subchasers were able to operate. 

PT boats S "26" and S "49" arrived at Constanta by way of the Danube 
on 3 Sep. Also 4 landing barges arrived at Sulina from Linz. 

It is planned to transfer 2 Italian submarines to Burgas where they 
are to prepare for a reconnaissance mission to the Bosporus, since 
they may be needed if the Russian naval or merchant fleet should try 
to break through. As soon as a new base on the Caucasian coast is 
won, the boats will be assigned a zone of operations in that area. 



-53- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

The 4.5 en battery at Balaklava is provisionally ready for action. 
Special Items : 

a. The Commanding Admiral, Black Sea reports that the Supply and 
Transportation Office of the Armed Forces Overseas agrees to the 
Navy's not taking over Dniepr coastal shipping, and will handle load- 
ing and unloading itself. 

b. A copy of the comments of Group South addressed to the Naval 
Liaison Officer at the Army High Command regarding the transfer of 
Nikolayev-Kherson transshipment traffic to Sevastopol is sent to the 
Naval Staff Operations Division and the Naval Staff Quartermaster Di- 
vision, Sea Transportation Branch. For cooy see 1 /Ski 21841/42 Gkdos. 
in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XI Va. 



LX. Situation East Asia 

A telegram from the German Admiral at Tokyo reports that Japaneso 
submarines during the month of July sank 10 ships of 95,000 GRT, the 
air forces 1 ship of 4,000 GRT, and surface forces 1 ship of 9,500 GRT; 
since the beginning of the war, 263 vessels totalling 1,644,000 GRT 
have been sunk. 

A Japanese auxiliary cruiser seized the steamers HAURAKI and GEV0TA in 
the Indian Ocean; according to an RR signal intercepted by the DOGGER- 
BANK, the HAURAKI was captured at 26° 44' S, 82Q 50' E, which is in the 
zone of operation of ship "10". The German Admiral at Tokyo has taken 
the necessary steps at the Japanese Navy Department. 

According to the U.S. Navy Department, U.S. submarines have reported 
sinking a Japanese light cruiser, 3 steamers and 1 tanker and damaging 
2 steamers and 2 "tankers; none of them were in connection with the 
operations in the Solomon Islands, and none were previously mentioned 
in the Navy Department's communiques. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A : 

The 46th Infantry Division met with strong resistance on the 
Taman Peninsula, the enemy trying to shield troop embarkations there. 
Our concentric attack on Novorossisk is making slow progress. Several 
enemy thrusts from the direction of Tuapse were repulsed. German 
forces broke through enemy positions north of Vozmeseskaya and ad- 
vanced to the south. Also the bridgehead north of Grozny was expanded 
southward. Enemy attacks on Kizlyar were repulsed. 

Army Group B : 

Heavy traffic observed on the railroad line to Astrakhan 
from the south was effectively disrupted. South of Stalingrad, strong 
enemy forces are holding out in heavily fortified positions west of 
the bend in the Volga River, German tank and infantry divisions 



-54- 



B-1052 



# 



CONFIDENTIAL 
4 Sep. 1942 

carried the attack from the west to the center of the city of Stalin- 
grad and are engaged in fierce fighting about 4 km from the Volga Riveri. 
Divisions of the LI Army Corps are taking part in the attack. Also the 
tank and motorized units fighting north of Stalingrad have begun to 
attack and have reached the hills north of the city in spite of strong 
counterattacks. Massed enemy attacks from the north, which were 
launched after an intensive artillery barrage, were dispersed with 
the assistance of strong air force formations. South of Livny the 
enemy renewed his offensive and succeeded temporarily in penetrating 
our positions. 

Central Army Group : 

The action south of Sukhinichi has developed into a bitter 
defensive battle against an enemy which is being constantly reinforced. 
East of Vyazma, Russian bomber planes attacked our positions and rear 
communications. The enemy tank offensive in the area south and east 
of Rzhev continues. After a massed artillery barrage, a few enemy 
tanks succeeded in breaking through our lines at several places; most 
of them were destroyed. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Partisan fighting west of Kholm. Attacks on the stretch 
leading to the II Army Corps were frustrated. South of Lake Ladoga and 
east of Leningrad the enemy repeated his attacks. In a thrust south- 
east of Leningrad he succeeded in forcing the Police Division back a 
few kilometers. • 

2. Finnish Front ; 

Local enemy offensive activity on the isthmus and at the 
Kaselskaya Army Group. About 130 Russians crossed Lake Ond and 
captured the village of Ondozero. Scouting and assault detachments in- 
creased their activities at the Litsa sector. 

3. North Africa ; 

In the course of 4 Sep. the enemy launched several futile 
attacks in the area of Alamnayil and suffered heavy losses. The com- 
mander of the 6th New Zealand Brigade was taken prisoner. According 
to his statements, General Auchinleck has become supreme commander in 
India, while General Wavell allegedly received a higher command. The 
enemy reconnoitered at the southeastern flank of our forces with scout 
cars and tanks. 

MB»t t«« mmM tt «mmM««M B M « Hmt 



-Q. 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
5 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Denmark : 

The Prime Minister addressed the Danish nation over the radio and 
appealed to the population to be prudent; the speech was motivated by 
a number of sabotage acts against the German Armed Forces. The Danish 
press repeated and emphasized the warning. 

Great 3ritaln : 

The financial secretary of the Admiralty warned against the propa- 
ganda for a Second Front, which has allegedly not yet calmed down in 
Great Britain. 

Vernon Bartlett declared that the possibility of a collapse of the 
Soviet Union should not be discounted; no one should imagine that 
Russia, China and the U.S.A. are waging war for the sake of a British 
victory. 

Australia : 

The Prime Minister spoke about the cooperation between the United 
Nations and particularly emphasized that the relations between Aus- 
tralia and the U.S.A. are becoming closer, and are balanced by the 
give and take between these countries. 

Portugal : 

Lisbon Foreign Office circles do not believe that Brazil would agree 
to American wishes for the occupation of the Portuguese Atlantic 
islands. 

Russia : 

It is rumored in Washington congressional circles that the Russian 
Government declined a U.S. offer of troops. Russia allegedly pointed 
out that she has sufficient manpower of her own, but that Allied de- 
liveries of materiel leave much to be desired. 

Iran : 

The Prime Minister has denied foreign rumors that Iran will join the 
war on the side of the Allies in the immediate future. 

U.S.A. : 

According to a Reuter dispatch, Welles announced that the U.S. Govern- 
ment has protested most vigorously to Vichy against the mass deporta- 
tions of Jewish refugees from France. 

Argentina ; 

The Ministry of the Interior prohibited all publication of moveirents 
of ships belonging to belligerent powers. 



-56- B -i° 5 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
5 Sep. 19^2 

Special Items ; 

I. The German Naval Command, Italy reports that the German General 
at Italian Armed Forces Headquarters declared it impossible to con- 
tinue the North African offensive. It is intended to retreat to the 
initial positions. Rommel gave the following reasons: 

a. The offensive was delayed due to extensive minefields, and 
there were heavy losses. 

b. The planned surprise was unsuccessful. 

c. British air superiority is too great. 

d. There is insufficient fuel. 

e. Conclusion: A quick success can no more be attained. 

Supplies are inadequate for a prolonged heavy systematic fight to 
achieve the objective. 

The German General added that Cavallero requested Field Marshal Kessel- 
ring to return from Africa to discuss the necessity of renewing the 
fight against Malta, so that North African supply shipments can be 
continued. According to the report of the German General at the 
Italian Armed Forces Headquarters to the German Naval Command, Italy, 
the Italian High Command radioed to the Commander in Chief, Panzer 
Army on 3 Sep. as follows: 

"The Duce took note of your decision to stop the offensive and 
announces that every effort will be made to transport supplies in 
order to enable the Army to repulse a possible enemy offensive and to 
make a successful counterattack. The Duce warns again of a possible 
enemy offensive in the direction of Siwa." 

It is significant that the first Italian reaction to 
the new situation should stress the Malta project. 
The Naval Staff shares the opinion that neglect of op- 
eration "Herkules" is exacting a heavy price. The Na- 
val Staff will support this opinion as strongly as 
possible in order to prevent to the best of its ability 
a future repetition of similar serious mistakes. 



Situation 5 Sep. 19*12 

I. Var in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. • 

2. Own Situation : 

The Naval Staff instructs ship "10" by Radiogram 0440, in- 
tended also for the Information of all ships in foreign waters, that 
the zone of operation of our auxiliary cruisers in the Indian Ocean, 
as of 10 Sep. is limited as follows by agreement with the Japanese 
Navy: 35° S, 60° E; 30° S, 70° E; JO S r 100° E; 50° S, 100° E; 50° S, 

. 57 - 



cc::fidi::~i.-.i 

5 Sep. 1942 

60° E, and west of 63 c th of 40° S. 

Ship "10" is further ir.forr.ed that Japanese consent to freedor. of op- 
eration en route to the Sunda Strait has not yet been received; the 
date of dismissal for the voyage to Japan depends on the receipt of 
this consent. (See Radiogram 0127.) 

I .h". HUE IS will pass through quadrant GZ 40 around 12 Sep. -he 
?.l Staff plans to have her r.eet ship "20" to deliver the Japanese 
plane. Since the submarine task force "Eisbaer" will cross the 
equator east of 15° V.' on 10 Sep. on her voyage to the Cape area and 
will operete there after 25 Sep., the plar. of ship "26" to withdraw 
to quadrant HH is wise. -he cr;' jir.al plan to transfer ship "2f ■■" to 
the Indian Ocean nust be abandoned at present, since Jape: 

r. the zone r>f operations there. As soon as the Cape operations of 
task force "Eisbaer 1 * are terminated, it is intended to transfer 
ship "2B" back to the eastern South Atlantic, until an adequate zone 
of operations in the Indian Ocean can be established. 

Directives to this effect are transmitted to ship "20" with Radiogram 
1522. 

The : ::.. ." I EPE SCELISUAIffl is instructed to proceed along the assigned 
latitude (see V.'ar Diary of 21 Aug.) to the longitude of point "Forelle", 
then to head for point "Rose" and to continue on route "G-elb". See 
Radiograr. 2C32. 

The Haval staff plans to replace the auxiliary supply ship PASSAT by 
the tar.her BRAKE and to have the latter supply ship '23" in her pres- 
ent zone of operations; also a re s of the UCKEHUft.HK vith ship 
"26" Is planned for the end of September. All ships in foreign 
waters are Lnforoied by the yaval Staff by Radiogram 1911 about the 
plans for ships "23",* "20", and "10". 

In addition, all ships in foreign waters are Instructed about the 
route of the Japanese diplcr exchange ship from Lourenco liarques 
to Liverpool. 11 I'll is scheouled to sail on 5 Sep. and HAHKDNDA on 
9 Sep. The ships are not to be molested. (See Radiogram 0122.) 

gram 1156 informs all ships in foreign waters about the silencing 
of the ultra long wave transmitter between 14 Sep. and 20 Oct. on 
account of repairs. ? ran. C533 deals with the enemy situation. 



II. Situation V.'est Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance over the part of the Channel re- 
vealed nothing of interest. 

According to an i liger.ee report from Belgrade, the rebel leader 

hailovich received radio instructions fron London to stage large- 
scale revolts between 15 and 25 Aug. Hoe the sE.re instructions were 
issued for the period of 6 to 16 Sep. This repeated directive Is 
interesting f~r the reason that the enemy landing at Dieppe on 26 Aug. 
coincided with the first period, so that a connection between these 
events appears possible. Thus the period between 6 and 1£ Sep. r:ay 
again be assumed to be a critical one for the West Area. 



-56- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
5 Sep. 1942 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

At 1730 an attempt to blow up the St. Assise radio station 
was uncovered. Explosive charges were removed from two of the main 
masts of the 500 KW transmitter* 

Channel Coast ; 

During the night of 4 Sep. the German AFRICANA convoy was un- 
successfully attacked by enemy planes between Boulogne and Dunkirk. At 
1030 Le Havre was attacked by planes, and the net barrage as well as 1 
harbor patrol vessel were damaged. 

In count ermeasure for the shelling of our convoy by a British long- 
range battery, the battery St. Margaret at Cliff and the city and 
harbor of Dover were shelled on 4 Sep. between 2210 and 2250 with 7 
38 cm rounds and 25 28 cm rounds by the batteries Todt, Grosser 
Kurfuerst, 702 and 1/725. 

The mine-laying operations of the PT boat flotillas were cut short 
owing to the weather. 

With regard to the short report of Group West concerning the seizure 
of the crew of the Casquets lighthouse see Telegram 1953. The light- 
house has been remanned and the defenses reinforced, because the light 
is essential for naval warfare. The Group emphasizes the value of the 
lighthouse as an excellent advance observation post, as proved by the 
Dieppe lighthouse. The upkeep is insignificant, compared with the weak 
and slow-moving patrol vessels which are always open to enemy attack. 

For the supplementary report of Group V/est, see Telegram 2400. 

A suspicious 3 master was halted at 2030 by one of our fighter planes 
north of Barfleur and badly damaged. Sinking was not observed. 

Special Items : 

a. In view of the important part played by enemy fighter forces 
during the Dieppe action, the Commanding Admiral, Group West suggested 
that in the program for construction of harbor defenses as part of the 
Westwall fortifications the priority of sectors 2 and 3 be interchanged. 

The Naval Staff does not agree with this proposal and insists that the 
order of priority must remain as established. For copy of the Naval 
Staff's extensive comment and the entire exchange of telegrams see 1/Skl 
I op 1661/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in War Diary, Part C, Vol. X. 

b. The temporary stay at Brest of the former Commanding Admiral, 
Battleships, Vice Admiral Ciliax has apparently caused rumors to 
circulate that the battleships will probably return there. Group '..'est 
points out that this is an opportunity to deceive the enemy and cause 
him concern and requests a decision or directive in this respect. 

The Commander in Chief, Navy agrees with the Naval Staff that nothing 
else needs to be done, since the rumors have probably already ac- 
complished their purpose. Group V/est is advised to this effect by 
telephone. For copy see l/Skl 1713/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in War Diary, Part 
C, Vol. IIB. 



-0- 



8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



5 Sep. 1942 



c. Group West reports additional plans for mine-laying opera- 
tion KA. Cutter floats will be laid in the following area: 49° 58'N, 
00° 49.5' Wj 50 01' N, 00° 50.5' W; 50° 05.5 'II. 00° 20* W; 50° 03' N, 
00° 19' \1. The code name for the operation is "Finale". 4 boats of 
the 2nd Mine Sv/eeper Flotilla will carry out the operation. 

The laying of barrages R II and R I will be known as operations 
"Runenschrift" and "Ranke" respectively. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea t 

During the night of 4 Sep. approximately 60 enemy planes 
concentrated their attack on Bremen and wrought heavy damage (see 
Telegram 0701). Leaflets were dropped in the Wilhelnishaven area. 

Convoy and channel-sweeping activities in the area of the Commanding 
Admiral, Defenses, North had to be curtailed due to the weather. 

2. Norway : 

On 2 Sep. the enemy fired 35 rounds on the harbors of Pet- 
samo and Trifona as well as on Rybachi Peninsula without effect. On 
2 and 4 Sep. enemy planes were active over the arctic coast. Bombs 
caused casualties among the crew of subchaser "1111" off Vardoe. 

Otherwise nothing to report. 

3. Arctic Ocean t 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reported 5 steamers on a course of 45° 
south of Novaya Zemlya at 1630. At 1218 a convoy was observed 
assembling in the Hval Fjord. 10 to 12 steamers, 2 tankers, 1 battle- 
ship, 3 cruisers, 4 destroyers, and 6 patrol vessels were counted. 
At the same time 1 aircraft carrier, 2 destroyers, 1 passenger liner 
of 20,000 GRT, 1 steamer and 1 patrol boat v/ere anchored in the Reidar 
Fjord (on the northeast coast of Iceland). 

The Air Commander, North Sea (West) reports that his forces located 

and reported the exact positions of 2,291 mines between the Norwegian 

west and the British east coast and Iceland during the period of 20 
Feb. to 30 Aug. 

Own Situation : 

Group North reports having instructed the Admiral, Arctic 
Ocean that the SCIIEER is. not to take part in operation "Doppelschlag", 
which is to be carried out by the HIPPER alone, at the earliest 
possible date in accordance with previous plans. The fleet is ordered 
to Investigate the shipyard situation at once in connection with the 
SCHEER'S need for an engine overhaul. 



-60- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
5 Sep. 1942 

IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

During the night of 4 Sep. enemy planes from the east carried out 
nuisance raids and attacks on Koenigsberg, Lodz, and Warsaw. Bombs 
were dropped at sea, off kernel, probably aimed at a convoy. For de- 
tails see Telegrams 0715 and 0753. 

Nothing of importance was reported from the area of the Commanding Ad- 
miral, Defenses, Baltic Sea. A Danish mine sweeper swept 1 mine in 
the Little Belt, another one was swept by a harbor patrol vessel west 
of Fehmarn Island and still another one by a vessel equipped with 
towed coil gear off Swinemuende. 

In the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea, the barrages 
"Seeigel" 51, 32, 36, 37 were laid according to plan during the night 
of 4 Sep. The Mine Sweeper M "30" had an encounter with enemy PT 
boats off Vigrund. 

1 enemy mine sweeper and 1 tow barge were sunk in the Kronstadt Sea 
Channel by battery Koenigsberg and an anti-aircraft battery. 

Mine-sweeping, submarine patrols, and convoy operations proceeded ac- 
cording to plan. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

No news of any importance was received during the day. A 
belated report of 28 Aug. revealed that the U.S. submarine "07" was 
operating in the Gulf of Maine in conjunction with surface forces. 

According to a British official announcement, 160 crew members died 
when the EAGLE was sunk. 

Press reports reveal the recent sinking by submarines in the North 
Atlantic of the following vessels: HOIIENSDE (?), PENROSE, SIRIS, 
NORTH DEVON, META, SKEDGATE, BENROFF, HOLLYSIDE, ALF, and the Norwegian 
steamer HAVSTEN. 

Radio New York reports an announcement of the Brazilian Air Ministry, 
according to which Brazilian planes sank a number of enemy sub- 
marines off the coast. 

2 . Own Situation : 

Submarine U "251" of the Norwegian group explains that the 
report of mine danger in quadrant AT 6249 was based on sighting what 
could be buoys or mines on the surface. 

Group "Loss" is ordered to take up patrol positions in the North At- 
lantic from quadrant AJ 8015 to BC 2279. 

Submarine U "513" sank 2 large ore ships of 18,500 GRT in a daylight 
attack off the U.S. coast in quadrant BB 6376. In the course of the 
attack the boat was rammed and has now withdrawn for repairs. 

Submarine U "171" reports from the West Indies sinking a 12,000 ton 
tanker of the CADILLAC type in quadrant DE 5165. 



-61- B-1052 



C0I.TIDEI1TIAL 
5 Sep. 1942 

Submarine U "506" of the South Atlantic group probably sank a 6,000 
G-RT steamer out of a snail convoy in quadrant FP 2938. 

Additional reports in Supplement to Submarine Situation, War Diary, 
Part 3, Vol. IV. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1 . British Isles and Vicinity : 

10 Spitfires v/ere shot dov/n during the day. Localities in 
southern England v/ere raided by fighter bombers; results were ob- 
served in some cases. 

In the night of 5 Sep. pamphlets v/ere dropped over cities in southern 
England. 

2. Incursions : 

During the night of 5 Sep. only a few enemy planes flew 
over the coastal areas of the Baltic and the Channel, none over German 
territory. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

Our planes supported the Panzer Army, Africa and carried out 
reconnaissance in the Central Mediterranean. 

4. Eastern Front ; 

Over the various Army sectors 119 enemy planes were brought 
down. 

Reconnaissance activity in the Black Sea and the Arctic Ocean. 

The harbor of Murmansk was raided; results were observed. 8 enemy 
planes v/ere shot dov/n by fighter escorts and 1 of our planes was lost. 



II. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1 . Enemy Situation : 

No tiling of importance to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

Tobruk v/as raided by enemy planes during the night of 3 Sep. 
without damage to harbor installations . 

The motor ship MONTI, beached at Punta Stilo, v/as unsuccessfully 
attacked by enemy planes during the night of 4 Sep. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

The Italian steamer ALBACHIARA (1,244 GRT ) v/as sunk at 0135 
by an enemy submarine while proceeding in convoy from Benghazi to 
Tobruk. 

-62- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
5 Sep. 1942 

Otherwise, the transport of supplies proceeded according to plan with- 
out major incident. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Radio monitoring revealed the KHARKOV, 1 destroyer and a 
total of 8 submarines at sea in the eastern part of the Black Sea. Air 
reconnaissance sighted one merchant vessel proceeding south in the 
Tuapse area. 

According to an intelligence report based on statements of war prisoners 
the following ships of the Black Sea fleet have been sunk: 

The destroyers FRUNSE, BODRY, BYITELNI , BYSTREI.', NEZAMOSHNIK, and 
SHAUMYAN; the gunboats KRASNY, PLMENIYA, ARMENIPA, besides 4 PT boats, 

3 trawlers, and 1 hospital ship. 

Damaged: the cruisers MOLOTOV and KRASNY KAVKAS and the destroyer 
SPOSOBNI, all by bomb hits, and the destroyer SOVERSHETTNY by a mine. 

Own Situation : 

The 1st PT Boat Flotilla under the command of Lt. Christiansen 
sank 4 steamers and 4 lighters totalling 9,500 GRT during a torpedo 
attack south of Taman Peninsula in the night of 4 Sep. In the course 
of this action, PT boat S n 27'* sank, probably because one of her own 
torpedoes was a circle runner. For details see Telegram 1720. 

During the night of 3 Sep. relatively little personnel and materiel 
could be ferried in connection with operation "Bluecher" because of 
bad weather. Taman Peninsula has been firmly in German hands since 

4 Sep. Only the south shore is still held by the enemy.. It must be 
assumed that enemy forces are being evacuated by means of small craft 
and the 1st PT Boat Flotilla has been given orders accordingly. (See 
above. ) 

Total amount of cargo unloaded in August: 

At Mariupol: 7,670 tons in 413 voyages. 

In the Sea of Azov: 10,500 tons. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



-63- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
5 Sep. 1942 

IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Amy Group A : 

The offensive against Novorosslsk was carried to a distance 
of 2 to 4 km from the town. Bitter fighting against superior enemy 
forces is in progress north of Tuapse. Enemy attacks north and west 
of Ilaisky were repulsed. The positions south of I.Iozdok are held by 
our panzer forces. 

Army Group B : 

The offensive against Stalingrad is making slow but steady 
progress. A strong enemy attack against the northern sector succeeded 
temporarily. By throwing in all of our reserves, we were able to re- 
store the situation. Enemy attacks in the eastern Don River bend and 
west of Livny were repulsed. 

Central Army Group ; 

All enemy attacks at the Zhizdra River front failed. In the 
Rzhev area the enemy offensive strength declined. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Fresh divisions of the 11th Army effectively relieved the 
situation at the sector between Soltsy and Lake Ladoga. Renewed enemy 
attacks on the front of the Police Division at the Leningrad sector 
failed. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

The enemy forces which had landed on the west shore of Lake 
Ond were destroyed. 

3. North Africa : 
Nothing to report. 



-64- B-1052 



y 



» 



CONFIDENTIAL 
6 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain and Russia : 

In a message addressed to the youth of Great Britain, Ambassador 
Mai sky called for the creation of a second front. 

Spain : 

The new Foreign Minister Jordanas told the German Ambassador that 
Spain's foreign policy will continue to be determined by the principle 
of non-belligerency and friendship for the Axis. He has ordered the 
Spanish press to remain friendly toward Germany. 



Special Items 

I. The Naval Representative at the Armed Forces High Command, Opera- 
tions Staff communicated on 5 Sep. as follows: 

a. The Fuehrer is reserving a directive for the execution of 
operation "Nordlicht" until after another conference with Field Marshal 
von Manstein and General von Richthofen. 

b. Since the 3rd Mountain Division will be committed for opera- 
tion "Nordlicht", operation "Lachsfang" is cancelled for the time 
being. Thus, the date for operation "Nordlicht" now depends on the 
restoration of the situation at the 16th Army Corps, on the alloca- 
tion of the necessary forces and ammunition, and on the weather condi- 
tions. 

The Naval Staff informs Group North accordingly. 

II. The causes responsible for discontinuing the offensive are re- 
vealed by a report of the High Command, Panzer Army, Africa, dated 3 
Sep. The principal reason is that the necessary fuel was not delivered 
as requested in order to carry out the operation planned in the defined 
area. Out of the amount of 5,000 tons announced by the Italians on 3 
Aug., 2,600 tons had already been sunk by 3 Sep. With the steamers 
BIANCIII and SP0RTIV0 scheduled to arrive at Tobruk on 3 Sep., the fuel 
supply of the Army would be ensured for 3 days after 7 Sep. at the 
rate of 100 kilometers per vehicle per day. The fuel situation of the 
Italian forces is still much worse. 

Apart from the unsatisfactory fuel situation, the following reasons 
make it necessary to call off the offensive: 

a. The first objective which should have been attained by the 
morning of 31 Aug. in an area 40 to 50 km east of the starting point 
was reached only in part in the evening of 31 Aug. on account of de- 
lays caused by minefields, the existence of which was not known. Thus 
the element of surprise, an important prerequisite for the success of 
the operation was lacking. 

b. Grave losses of men and materiel by day and night ever since 
the beginning of the operation, caused by enemy air raids. 

On 3 Sep. the Duce took note of the decision to halt the offensive and 
informed the Command, Panzer Army that everything possible will continue 
to oe done to rush the transport of supplies, so that the army will be 

"65" B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



6 Sen. 1942 



in a position to repulse a potential enemy offensive and to launch a 
successful counterattack. 

Marshal Cavallero attempted on 4 Sep. to prove to the German General at 
the Italian Amy Headquarters that tactical reasons were primarily re- 
sponsible for calling off the offensive; and that the supply situa- 
tion was not so unfavorable at the time the decision was taken, since 
numerous shiploads of fuel were still en route then, the majority of 
which were sunk only at a later date. 

Ee also pointed to the endangered shipping situation which demands un- 
equivocally that the Alamein position be held under all circumstances; 
if the Royal Air Force should advance further westward, transports to 
Tobrul: would become altogether impossible. In order to keep the Panzer 
Army in combat shape, Malta must be paralyzed more effectively, since 
we can no longer hope to eliminate the enemy air forces in Egypt in the 
near future. 

The Malta problem is at present so urgent that the Duce has requested 
Field Marshal Kesselring to come to Rome for a conference about re- 
suming the battle against the island on a larger scale and increasing 
the air protection of shipping. 



Italy see 



For the report of the German Naval Command, 

War Diary of 5 Sep. The Naval Staff will comment 

rately on this problem. 



sepa- 



Situation 6 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 

North Atlantic ; 

According to an intelligence report from Portugal, the U.S. 
is still trying to have Brazil occupy the Portuguese Atlantic islands. 
Agents are to make the necessary preparations, beginning with the Cape 
Verde Islands. 

South Atlantic: 



coal supply 
enough coal 
because not 
Trinidad. 



directive to Allied shipping reveals once more that the 
is meeting with difficulties; ships are advised to load 
in South Africa to 
more than 300 tons 



last for the entire voyage to the U.S. A, 
apiece can be allotted to any ship at 



Indian Ocean : 

An agent reports that the U.S. cruiser JUNEAU, escorting a 
U.S. convoy, arrived at Colombo and sailed one week later as escort 
of another convoy for Australia. 

It is belatedly revealed by a deciphered radio communication of the Ad- 
miralty that the enemy in connection with the capture of the MADRONO 
is aware that a German auxiliary cruiser is operating in the Indian 
Ocean. The ship is referred to as auxiliary cruiser "E". 



-66- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
6 Sep. 1942 

2. Own Situation ; 

On 5 Sep. the Japanese Admiralty expressed agreement through 
the Naval Liaison Officer to the operations plan for a German auxiliary 
cruiser in the Indian Ocean in accordance with our proposal. Copy of 
the corresponding note in War Diary, Part C, Vol. I. 

Ship "10" receives information about the sailing order to the CHARLOTTE 
SCHLIEMANN for the voyage to Japan through the Indian Ocean, See 
Radiogram 1135. 

Ship "28" is advised by the Naval Staff to meet the TANNENFELS after 
12 Sep. at a point 4° further south and 7° further east than point 
"Utrecht" and to take aboard the Japanese plane and half of the avail- 
able supplies. The other half is earmarked for ship "28". The 
TANNENFELS is unable to supply fuel. (See Radiogram 2115.) 

Instructions for the TANNENFELS for her rendezvous with ship "28" are 
sent by Radiogram 2206. 

Information about the enemy situation by Radiogram 0622. 

The German Admiral at Tokyo reports on 5 Sep. a request of the Japanese 
Navy to check on the advisability of the visit by auxiliary cruiser 
"10 , in view of the very critical fuel situation. For a copy of the 
telegram, which apart from the above contains what the German Admiral 
at Tokyo believes to be the real reasons for this rather odd Japanese 
behavior, see 1/Skl 21936/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. I. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

No extraordinary ship movements were observed in the Channel. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

The first major case of sabotage is reported to have taken 
place on 3 Sep. The Diesel generator of the submarine pen at Brest was 
damaged by an explosion. Two attempts were made to blow up the trans- 
former plants in the shipyard area, but were only partially successful. 

Channel Area : 

The suspicious sailing vessel damaged off Barfleur on 5 Sep. 
by gunfire was tov/ed into Cherbourg and turned out to be a French 
fishing vessel. For the night of 6 Sep. a mine-laying mission of the 
5th PT Boat Flotilla and mining operation "Runenschrift" are scheduled. 

An enemy long-range battery opened fire on a German convoy at 2155. 
In turn Army Coastal Battery "702" fired on the enemy batteries. 
Batteries "Todt" and "Grosser Kurfuerst" fired on Dover. 



-67- B-1052 



6 se?. :; 

III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Little air activity over the Z-ernan Bight and the Shagerrak. 
According to photo reconnaissance, the followln : _rs were at Scar>a 
Flow at noon: 2 battleships of V class, 1 battleship 

of the RODHEX cr ITIISC:: class, a; ltly 1 heavy cruiser of the 
CVh-EIfLAPT class, 3 light cruisers, 1 destroyer escort, 1 destroyer 
flotilla leader, and 4 destroyers . 

Own Situation : 

Enemy air raids by small forces were carried out on the steel 
and nitrogen plant at Ijnuiden and on the Y.'esernuende area. 

Convoy operations according to plan. '.line-sweeping activities curtail- 
ed by bad weather. 

2. Norway : 

On 5 Sep. at 0532 a British plane with Australian crew made 
a forced landing within range of the Arctic coast after being fired on 
by the subchaser "1105" at Vardoe. The plane, which will be salvaged, 
carried valuable secret intelligence material. For this reason the 
incident will not be published. 

Enemy planes attacked subchaser "1103" on 6 Sep. off Vardoe without 
inflicting any damage. 

The tugs SEETEUFEL and TAIFUN returned with their tows to Kristiansand, 
South due to bad weather, after a vain attempt to leave. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

According to air reconnaissance , the following ships were in 
B inner Reidar Fjord (Iceland) at 1345; 2 aircraft carriers, 1 
battleship, 5 cruisers, and 9 destroyers. An additional cruiser was 
observed arriving. This observation, together with the accumulation 
of merchant vessels and warships seer, on 5 Sep. in the hval Pjrrd, 
lead to the assumption that a convoy "..ill leave soon, ^'r.e assumption 
is confirmed by the secret radio in: s salvaged frcr. the Bri- 
tish plane which made a forced landing off Vardoe. According to a 
preliminary r?—rt of the 5th .'.in Force, this plane belongs to squadron 
455 which was transferred to the Uurmansk area as added protection for 
the convoys PQ 18 and QP 14. 

As further established by the 5th i: P . ce, the papers found in the 
salvage! plane contain complete radio communication instructions for 
PQ 18 and QP 14. They are being interpreted at Kirkenes, and the in- 
formation will be passed on by telegram. 

Own Situation : 

e 5th Destroyer Flotilla returned to Kirkenes at 0300 due 
to the STElHBRHf CK * S t ground; Z of the destroyers sailed again 
at 2000 for mining operations "Romanow" and "Zarewitsch"'. 



-68- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
6 Sep. 1942 

The Admiral, Arctic Coast reports to Group North, with copy to the Na- 
val Staff, further information in connection with the loss of the 
mine-laying vessel ULM. Among other findings it is revealed that the 
ULM first hoisted the Panamanian flag as ordered, and then when the 
enemy opened fire, hoisted the German war flag. She then fired a few 
10.5 cm rounds in reply. The secret documents wore destroyed. It can 
hardly bo expected that there are additional survivors, unless some 
were taken prisoner by the enemy, which is doubtful. For details see 
Telegram 1400. 

Group North suggests how the report about scuttling the ship should be 
released; the enemy's unfair treatment of helpless survivors is to be 
emphasized. (See Telegram 1257.) 

The Naval Staff will first examine the legal aspects of this question. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

According to Danish press reports, the Swedish steamer VIROS (190 GRT ) 
sank on 3 Sep. west of Ilirtshals after striking a mine. Pishing 
steamers are reported to have run into a mine field off Ilirtshals. It 
seems that the enemy has extended his mining activities recently to 
the Skagerrak . 

The Finnish steamer BRITANNIC (2,200 GRT) sank in Aalborg Bay due to 
striking a mine while sailing in a prohibited channel. 

Otherwise nothing of importance to report from the area of the Command- 
ing Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea. 

In the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic. Sea the minefields 
"Seeigel 53" and the Onterjaervin cutter float barrage were laid ac- 
cording to plan. Mine-sweeping activities suffered from bad weather. 

Transport and convoy operations proceeded uneventfully. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Very lively reconnaissance activity of the 19th Air Group. 
A submarine attack was reported 50 miles southwest of Aruba, 

2 . Own Situation : 

Submarine U "251" of the Norwegian group was assigned an 
operation zone off the northern tip of Novaya Zemlya; the zone of op- 
erations of submarine U "601" ends at 90° E. 

In the North Atlantic, task force "Vorwaerts" is ordered to operate 
against the convoy presumed to be in quadrant AK 93. The "Loss" group 
is to take up new patrol positions between quadrants A J 8631 and 9736. 

No reports about any achievements were received from the U.S. East 
Coast. 

-69- B-1052 



COM F IDEOTIAL 

6 Sep. 1; 

Submarine "154" sank I st . of 2,0C. i in quadrant EC in the 
V.'est Indies. 

Submarine U "107" of the South Atlantic group reports 4 unescorted 
stear.ers on a southerly course off Lisbon; she sank 2 of then, total- 
ling 0,500 G?l?, on 3 Se . 

Seven s ibnarinea are bei.nr; combined to form task force "litis"; they 
are to start from positions between quadrants CF 7556 and 0654 on 9 
Sep. at 2000 and to proceed southward at the rate of 160 miles a day. 

Submarine U "109" sank the steamer 1 STAR (11,449 BRT) in quad- 
rant 77 1149 . 

The South Atlantic group, including task force "Eisbaer", receives 
permission to attack as far south as 5° S. 

Additional reports in Supplement to Submarine Situation in Bar Diary, 
Part 3, Vol. IV-. 



VI. Aerial V.'arfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

During the day reconnaissance and fighter bomber activity 
against Dover and Aldershot. 

During the night of 6 Sep. several localities, among them Sunderland, 
were raided. 

2. Enemy In c ur s i or. s • 

130 out of 100 planes penetrated into western German terri- 
tory. The attacks concentrated on Duisburg, where damage was fairly 
heavy. For details see daily situation report. 

3. '. Mediterranean Theater : 

Our air forces supported the North .-.frican Panzer Army. 

4. Eastern Front : 

The Air Force General Staff reports 57 planes shot down. 
Reconnaissance was flown over the Black Sea and the Arctic Ocean. 



VII. T/arfare in the hedit erranean and the Black Sea 

1 . Enemj Situation, Mediterranea n : 

According to an 1 tel 1 \..ce report, the battleship RA&ILLIES 
which left Gibraltar on 3 Sep. took aboard 1,000 infantrymen" and 60 
machine guns. The same i p of Canadian and Scotch troops was dis- 
embarked there by a transport which arrived during the night of 4 Sep. 
3 was evidently a relief operation. 



-70- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
6 Sep. 1942 

An intelligence report from Spain contends that th«3 ships which 
passed the Strait of Gibraltar during the nights of 30 Aug. and 1 Sep. 
were probably landing craft, coastal patrol boats, and tugboats, the 
arrival of which at Gibraltar has allegedly been established. In the 
evening of 5 Sep. another 20 snail vessels reportedly entered Gibral- 
tar" under naval flag, among them the corvette K "79", 2 tugs and 12 
motor launches. 

Nothing to report about the enemy situation in other parts of the 
Mediterranean. 

2. Own Situation : 

During the aerial attack on the convoys of the PADEN1IA and 
the BIANCHI on 4 Sep., the Italian torpedo boat POLLUCE was also sunk. 

As a result of an enemy air raid on Tobruk during the night of 4 Sep. 

1 Italian landing barge was disabled. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

The following ships have been added to the disturbingly 
large number of those lost so far: 

a. The motor ship MANARA was torpedoed by an enemy plane out 
of a convoy south of Corfu and was towed to Corfu. 

b. The steamer PAOLINA, damaged on 27 Aug. off Cape Bon by 
striking a mine, has. sunk. 

The steamer ALBACHIARA, sunk on 5 Sep., carried a cargo of 400 tons of 
fuel for the 3 branches of the German Armed Forces, and 66 tons of 
Army materiel. 

2 Italian hospital ships left North Africa for Italy on 4 and 5 Sep. 
with approximately 1,000 German wounded soldiers. 

4 mine sweepers sailed from Taranto and Brindisi for North Africa 
during the night of 5 Sep. 

Special Items : 

On 30 Aug., the German Naval Command, Italy submitted a summary and 
analysis of the British convoy operation in the Mediterranean during 
the period of 10 to 15 Aug. 1942 with 2 maps attached. For photo- 
stat, copy no. 8, see l/Skl 2K995/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. XIV. 

The Naval Staff does not fully share the opinion of the German Naval 
Command, Italy with regard to the purpose of that operation. The Na- 
val Staff considers it altogether plausible that the supposed opera- 
tion was planned exclusively to supply Malta. The statements ma'de by 
the surviving crew members in Tunis would support this assumption, but 
the German Naval Command, Italy did not take them into account. Ac- 
cording to these statements, the convoy consisted of not more than 12 
to 14 merchant vessels. This matter has not yet been clarified. The 
importance of thus supplying Malta by five large vessels has since 
become only too apparent through the development of the supply situa- 
tion during the recent weeks and its dire consequences for the opera- 
tions of the North African Panzer Army. 



-71- 8-1052 



CONFIDEimAL 
6 Sep. 1942 

4 . Area Naval Group South ; 
Aegean Sea ; 

On 5 Sep. the enemy launched a futile aerial attack on the 
stealer PROSERPINA at Candia. 1 of the attacking planes was shot^ - 
down. 

Convoy traffic proceeded uneventfully. 

Special Item ; 

The Commanding Admiral, Aegean Sea has expressed his view in detail 
to the Bureau of Naval Administration about the question of reducing 
the costs for the occupation of Greece. In this connection, Group 
South reiterates that the major portion of the expenses in Greece 
charged to the Navy are incurred in the interest of all branches of 
the Armed Forces. For copy of his telegram see l/Skl 2205C/42 Gkdos. 
in Bar Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Air reconnaissance revealed 2 convoys of 3 tankers on a 
southeasterly course west of Gagry, 1 convoy and a floating dock in 
tow southwest of Novorossisk, 1 tanker sailing from Tuapse, another 
tanker off Sukhum, all on a southeasterly course. 

«> 

Own Situation ; 

A mission carried out by 4 Italian subchasers on the even- 
ing of 5 Sep. in the area of Novorossisk was unsuccessful. 

In view of the offensive towards Novorossisk, the 1st ?T Boat Flo- 
tilla operated close to shore between Tuapse and Sochi, and 4 Italian 
subchasers between Novorossisk and Cape Idukopas during the night of 
6 Sep. No report about any achievements was received thus far. 

The harbor of Anapa is protected with 2 captured 4.7cm guns, one 2cm 
anti-aircraft gun and 8 Rumanian 7.5 cm anti-tank guns. In addition. 
we captured two 15 cm and two 10.2 cm guns. The mine situation has 
not yet been clarified. 

The supply service between Kerch and Taman has started under escort 
of the 3rd IJotor Mine Sweeper Flotilla; also transports to Yeisk have 
begun. 

The suitability of Temryuk as transshipping harbor for the Kuban 
traffic is under investigation. 

As a result of renewed conferences with Army Group A, the maritime 
and river transport from Rostov and up the Don River has been made a 
responsibility of the Navy, after all. The Army Engineers Field 
'waterways Detachment has been subordinated for this purpose to the 
harbor command of Rostov. 



-72- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
6 Sep. 1942 

VIII. S it uation E a st Asia 

As related by the German Admiral, Tokyo, the Japanese Naval 
Staff reports about the situation in the Solomon Islands as follows: 

Tulagi and Florida are in American hands. Eeavy fighting in progress 
on Guadalcanal. The strength of the U.S. forces is estimated at 
10,000 men and is growing through reserves brought up on destroyers. 
The Japanese are landing army units; they place particular importance 
on this action and consider the Solomon Islands the key position for 
operations against Australia. 



IX. Army Sit ua tion : 

1. R ussian Front ; 

Army Group A : 

The port city of Novorossisk was captured at 1830 by German 
and Rumanian forces. Otherwise the situation on the Caucasian front 
shows no important changes. 

Army Group D : 

Some of our formations operating against Stalingrad were 
reorganized. Enemy attempts to break through the encirclement to the 
northwest failed. West of Serafimovich the enemy succeeded in cross- 
ing the Don River southward and to push in the left v/ing of the 
Italian Division. 

Central Army Group : 

East of Vyazma the enemy attacked from a southerly direc- 
tion with superior forces and broke into our positions. The penetra- 
tion was sealed off. Counterattacks are in progress. There was 
only little fighting at the Rzhev sector. 

Northern Army Group : 

All enemy attacks undertaken at various sectors of this 
group were repulsed. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

Scouting activity and gun fire on both sides. 

3. North Africa : 

Normal reconnaissance and artillery activity on 5 and 6 Sep. 
Less enemy air activity. Between 30 Aug. and 5 Sep. we destroyed or 
captured a total of 124 enemy tanks and armored cars; we destroyed 
about 100 motor vehicles, 10 guns, and 22 anti-tank guns, and took 
400 prisoners. 



-73- B " 1052 



COI^FIDENTIAL 
7 Sep. i; 

I^e-.s of Political Ir.Dortance 

■ 

Great Britain : 

In its first number after reappearing, the Pail? Worker demands the 

dilate opening of a second front, closer collaboration with the 
U.S.A., greater assistance to the Red Amy, and the resumption of 
negotiations with India regarding the creation of a national govern- 
ment. 

Spain : 

Accordir.r to press reports a Spanish-Argentinian trade agreement was 
signed on 5 Sep. It was agreed that Argentina will deliver 1 million 
tons of wheat and 3,500 tons of tobacco which will be paid by Spain 
vith the construction of 2 new 9,000 GRT merchant vessels and 1 

... TIS type destroyer. Spain also undertakes to deliver 30,000 tons 
of steel. 

..r ~ :-.-.Ti.-.a : 

The deliberations of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the Chamber of 
Deputies concerning the break of relations with the Axis Powers con- 
tinue. The Government is trying to prevent a final report. 

Chile: 

A secret Senate vote referring to the question of breaking diplomatic 
relations with the Axis Powers is slated for 9 Sep. It may bring an 
anti-German majority, 

Japan: 



The press emphasizes strongly that there will be no change in the re- 
lations with Russia in the near future. 

Hungary : 

~.:rs of an alleged change of the Vienna decision are officially - 
denied. 



Special Items : 

I. In a discussion between the Chief of Staff of the Naval Staff and 
Admiral Nomura^ the basic problems of German and Japanese strategy 
were clearly outlined. 

For a transcript of the conversation see 1/Skl lb 176e/4£ Gkdos. Chefs 
in Y/ar Diary, Part C, Vol. XV. 

II. In connection with the transfer home of the cruiser SGHEER, Group 
North reported its plan to provide 4 torpedo boats as escort, namely 
the T "9" and T "±2", which are at this moment in Trondheim engaged in 
open water torpedo firing, and the T "15" ana T "17" which are at the 
disposal of the torpedo school for submarine and torpedo training. 

The Naval Staff informed Group North, with copy to the Fleet and the 
Commander, Destroyers, that further delays and reduction of submarine 
and torpedo training cannot be tolerated. The torpedo boats T n 15 n and 



-74- 



5- : : : : 



C0NFIDL3TTIAL 
7 Sep. 1942 

T "17" can therefore be released for the intended purpose only if the 
operation occurs between training periods and the ships are not in 
need of overhaul at that time. 

III. The Commanding Admiral, Submarines utilizes the discussion about 
developing an anti-destroyer missile to state his fundamental views on 
cooperation of naval ordnance with the Commanding Admiral, Submarines. 

The Submarine Division of the Naval Staff will attend to the matter. 
For copy no. 4 see 1/Skl 1743/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in V/ar Diary, Part C, 
Vol. IV. 

IV. A review of the dock facilities for large warships in the U.S. 
and U.S. overseas possessions is contained in report no. 41/4.2 of the 
Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign Navies Branch. 

For a press report about the expansion of the U.S. cruiser fleet see 
appendix to report no. 209 of the Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign 
Press Branch. 

The Chief, Naval Staff is on an inspection tour in the Crimea and will 
return on 10 Sep. 



Situation 7 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1 . Enemy Si t uation : 

The German Armistice Commission, France submits the evalua- 
tion of French reconnaissance on the West African coast during the first 
half of 1942, as received from the French in the course of the regular 
exchange of information: 

a. Freetown is the main control and assembly port (le grand 
regulateur) for convoys sailing from the British Isles to India via the 
Cape. On the average 30 to 40 merchant vessels are in the harbors; the 
number increases to over 100 when several convoys are in port at the 
same time. 

b. Convoys from the British Isles to the Cape apparently run be- 
tween 19° and 23° W on a southerly courso and pass on either side of 
the Cape Verde Islands. The ships head for Freetown at a great dis- 
tance from the French West African coast. 

c. Convoy escorts: 

(1) For fast convoys and troop transports: 1 slow battle- 
ship or aircraft carrier or 2 large cruisers, in each case supported by 
5 to 6 destroyers or corvettes. 

(2) For slow convoys consisting of freighters: As a rule, 

1 cruiser with several destroyers or corvettes, sometimes destroyers or 
corvettes alone. 

(3) For convoys formed at Freetown from single ships: several 
corvettes. 

d. Tankers arrive and depart singly. They most likely come from 
either Curacao or Trinidad. 

B-1052 

-75- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



7 Sep. 1942 

(e) Convoys remain at Freetown from 4 to days to replenish 
supplies of water, food, and fuel. 

2. Own Situation: 



"10 



»> . 



At 2038 the following short signal was received fron ship 



"Owing to present poor prospects in present zone of operations request 
dismissal to Japan as soon as possible." 

Receipt is confirmed by the Naval Staff with Radiogram 2154. 

Ship "28" is instructed to leave the Japanese plane on board the 
TAKNENFELS to be picked up by ship "23", if it" is smaller and lighter 
than an Arado plane, because ship "23" is having difficulties with the 
Arado on account of its weight and size. Ship "23 n is likewise in- 
formed. At the moment, 4 reserve Arado planes are on 3 different 
vessels, all ready for sailing. (See Radiogram 2312.) Both ships are 
directed with Radiogram 0523 to remove the rubber gasket of the pistol 
connection of the torpedo warheads, in order to fasten the pistol more 
securely. 

The German Admiral, Tokyo reports that no answer has yet been received 
from the Japanese Admiral Staff to the inquiry about the operation of 
a German auxiliary cruiser in the South Pacific, in spite of repeated 
reminders. The interpreter hinted that the Japanese do not desire 
German ships to penetrate into Japan's real zone of operations. The 
German Admiral proposes that this question be resumed when ship "10" 
is in Yokohama. 

Information about the enemy situation is sent by Radiogram 1554. 



II. Situation Vi'est Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to the report of Group West, no clues as to poten- 
tial landing operations can be deduced from the enemy's mining acti- 
vities during August. 

Air reconnaissance observed mine-sweeping operations between Dungeness 
and Dover and also off Hastings. 

2. Own Situatio n: » 
Atlantic Coast ; 

The IVESERLAND is scheduled to depart on 8 Sep. 

Channel Coast ; 

Due to weather conditions, the mine-laying mission of the 
5th PT Boat Flotilla scheduled for the night of 6 Sep. was cancelled. 
During the same night mine-laying operation "Runenschrift" was carried 
out according to plan. Operation "Ranke" is planned for the night of 
7 Sep. In addition, mine-laying operations by 6 boats of the 5th PT 
Boat Flotilla off the southern coast and torpedo operations by 14 boats 

-76- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
7 Sep. 1942 

of the 2nd, 4th, and 6th PT Boat Flotillas off the southeastern coast 
are planned for the night of 7 Sep. 

The Armed Forces High Command reports by telephone that the Fuehrer 
agrees to remanning the raided Casquets station, if certain conditions 
are observed. 

The Fuehrer requests an immediate thorough investigation and report 
about the following: 

a. Which local commander was responsible for the defense. 

b. Whether any of the responsible authorities can be assumed to 
be guilty. 

c. What orders had been issued to the garrison of the base. 

d. What defense facilities are available (details and photos to 
be submitted). 

The Fuehrer orders that anyone responsible for faulty defenses should 
be called to account. 

A corresponding directive is issued to Group West and the Admiral, 
French Coast, with copy to the Naval Representative at the Armed Forces 
High Command, Operations Staff; it orders Group West to clarify the 
matter of responsibility and to answer the different questions for 
which the Admiral, French Coast will furnish the required data immedi- 
ately. The report is to be transmitted to the Naval Staff by courier. 

According to an additional report of the Armed Forces High Command, the 
Fuehrer asked for further information about the following points > 

a. Was the Naval Shore Commander, Normandy aware of the order 
that small advanced bases must be adequately protected against surprise 
attacks in proportion to the danger to which they are exposed? 

b. Were all precautions taken in this particular case? If so, 
what were they? 

c. How was it possible that the base was raided nevertheless? 

d. Was the divisional commander responsible for the defense 
sector of the Naval Shore Commander, Normandy informed of the fact 
that the island was garrisoned? 

These questions are also transmitted to Group West and the Admiral, 
French Coast for answering. 

It seems that the Armed Forces High Command is under a 
wrong impression about the importance of that small ad- 
vanced post. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 



8-1052 
-77- 



confidential 

7 Sep. 1942 

Ov.'n Situation : 

Enemy air reconnaissance ranged over the entire Serman 
3ight during the night of 6 Sep, 4 boribs were dropped on Emden. 

5 enemy courier planes crossed the Skagerrak from Sweden to England. 
Strong enemy air forces flew across the area of the Admiral, Nether- 
lands. Aerial nines are suspected in qtiadrants AN 9506 and AK 9593. 4 
ground mines were swept in the area of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, 
North. 

Around noon, 15 U.S. Boeing type bombers and several Spitfires raided 
Rotterdam, dropping 10 bombs. The shipyard escaped damage. 

It is belatedly reported with reference to the raid on 5 Sep. upon the 
blast furnaces at Ijmuiden that a half month's production of steel 
will be lost due to the destruction of 2 Siemens-Martin furnaces. 

2. Nor way ; 

A Russian battery of the Rybacni Peninsula fired unsuccess- 
fully on a cutter and a Finnish passenger vessel enterxng Petsamo. On 

6 Sep. a submarine chaser group off Vardoe was attacked by 2 enemy 
planes with resulting slight damages and losses of personnel. Another 
air attack off the Sylte Fjord on a westbound convoy was unsuccessful. 

The Commanding Admiral. Norway requests the permission to lay an addi- 
tional mine field in the I,:alangen Fjord, because the Norwegian inertia 
contact mines laid in January 1942 seem to be no longer active, ac- 
cording to observations. (See Telegram 1930.) 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

According to a decoded radio message,- the 95th .Naval Air 
Force Regiment received the following instructions from the Chief of 
Naval Air Forces, Russian Arctic Fleet: 

For the protection of convoys PQ 18 and QP 14, I herewith order: 

The operation for the protection of convoys PQ 1C and QP 14 is to be 
divided into 5 stages corresponding to their routes. 

1st ,stage: Voyage of convoy PQ 18 from Iceland to 10° (probably E) 
from 10 to 12 Sep. 1942. 

2nd stage: Voyage of PQ 18 from 10° to. 25° E. Departure of convoy 
QP 14 from (Polyarnoye ?). Approximate duration from 
10 to 12 Sep. 1942. 

3rd stage: Voyage of PQ 18 between 25° and 41° E, of QP 14 after 

reaching point 146 and unknown point 361. Approximate 
duration from 12 to 14 Sep. 1942. 

4th stage: Voyage of PQ 18 and QP 14 off Novaya Zemlya. Approximate 
duration from 14 to 16 Sep. 1942. 

5th stage: Voyage of PQ 18 from unknown point 146 to unknown point 

148, of QP 14 from Novaya Zemlya in the direction of Ice- 
land. Approximate duration from 16 to 20 Sep. 



-78- 



6-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
7 Sep. 1942 

According to another decoded radio directive of 2058, air force units 
are being transferred to the air force station at Ponoi on the east 
coast of the Kola Peninsula and placed under the operational command 
of the 95th Air Force Regiment. The command of the latter was to 
transfer on 7 Sep. from the Vayenga air force station with the forces 
assigned to him and be ready to operate from Ponoi. 

Around midnight the 9th Air Force Regiment received the following op- 
erations order dated 5 Sep. from the staff of the naval air forces of 
the Arctic Fleet: 

a. The TIRPITZ and the SCIEEER are at unidentified locations in 
quadrants 835 and 873; the HIFPER is in quadrant 340 and (presumably 
German destroyers) are in 374. Their bases are at 637 in western Nor- 
way; they cruise periodically in 145, thus threatening Allied convoys. 

b. Naval air forces of the Arctic Fleet with, other assigned air 
units, including the air forces of the 14th Army and the 122nd and 
104th Air Divisions will protect the voyage of convoys PQ 18 and QP 14, 
both of them simultaneously while PQ 18 is proceeding from Novaya Zem- 
lya to 389. 

Air reconnaissance located the following ships in the Seydis Fjord at 
1020: Aircraft carrier ARGUS, 1 light DIDO class cruiser, 2 cruisers, 
apparently U.S. S0MERS class, 2 destroyers of the V and W classes, 1 
KJ class destroyer, 6 additional destroyers, 1 tanker, 1 steamer. 

Own Situation : 

On the basis of information found in the enemy plane after 
its forced landing on 6 Sep., Group North intends to have the HIPPER 
and the KOELN and 5 destroyers stand by for an operation against con- 
voy QP 14 from the Alta Fjord; from what has been learned so far, QP 
14 will sail approximately 2 days later than PQ 18. The planned min- 
ing operations in the Pechora Sea are postponed for the time being. 
The Commanding Admiral, Group North inquired from the Chief of Staff, 
Naval Staff by telephone whether he may count on receiving permission 
to use the TIRPITZ for the same operation as the HIPPER and KOELN. 
The Chief of Staff, Naval Staff replied in the negative. The NIPPER 
and KOELN can be committed only outside the range of the probable 
escort forces of PQ 18. In this case the TIRPITZ is not needed. Should 
it seen necessary to commit the TIRPITZ, however, in case it appears 
that strong escort forces will be encountered, we must reconsider the 
entire question of committing our naval forces against PQ 18 as again- 
st previous convoys. 

The Naval Staff informs the Naval Representative at the Armed Forces 
High Command, the Permanent Representative of the Commander in Chief, 
Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters, and the Naval Representative at the 
Air Force Operations Staff about the plans of Group North. 

Due to the altered enemy situation, the Admiral, Arctic Ocean has made 
it the main task of the submarines to intercept the convoys. The mine 
operations "Romanow" and "Zarewitsch" are to be carried out according 
to plan by 3 destroyers of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla. 

Group North ordered the Admiral, Arctic Ocean to postpone execution of 
operation "Doppelschlag" until it is clear when convoys PQ 18 and QP 
14 will depart; to hold the available submarines in readiness to oper-, 
ate against the convoys, cancelling any mining missions previously 
planned; and finally, to dispatch the HIPPER and the KOELN under escort 
of 4 destroyers against convoy QP 14. The Admiral, Arctic Ocean has 



-79- B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
7 Sep. 1942 

operational command, the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers tactical command. 
For this purpose, the task force will transfer to Alta Fjord; the 
TIRPITZ and 1 or 2 destroyers will be held in reserve in the Bogen Bay. 
The SCIIEER is to be transferred soon as far as Trondheim. 

The Commanding Admiral, .Cruisers had hoisted his flag on the TIRPITZ 
as ordered, even before this directive became effective. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Nothing to report from the area of the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea, 

Concerning the reinforcement of Denmark's coastal defenses, the Naval 
Staff reports to the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff that 
a wrong impression was given, since additional coastal batteries cannot 
at this time be made available. The Naval Shore Commander, Denmark 
has made a request to the Commanding General, Armed Forces, Denmark 
pertaining to the construction of hedgehog defenses at the bases of 
Frederikshavn and Skagen against attacks from land. (See V/ar Diary of 
27 Aug.) 

In the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea minefield 
"Nashorn 13" v/as laid according to plan. Mine-sweeping operations 
were curtailed in part by bad weather. 

Special Item: 

Due to erroneous information about the number of German torpedo mines 
type B used in the minefield off V/indau, the Commander, Mine Sweepers, 
North " 




m: 

vessels ran into the minefield. The Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic 
Sea reported on 3 Jul. in reply to an inquiry of the Naval Staff that 
the wrong figure had been given to the Commander, Mine Sweepers, North 
Sea by the task force commander at that time. The Naval Staff re- 
quests Group North for its comment, in order to be able to submit the 
matter to the Commander in Chief, Navy for a decision regarding fur- 
ther action. For copy see 1/Skl I E 21704/42 Gkdos. in V/ar Diary, 
Part C, Vol. VI. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

Short report no. 29/42 of the Naval Intelligence Division, 
Foreign Merchant Marine Branch contains information about ore ship- 
ments from Lulea, about the markings of the Spanish ships chartered 
by Switzerland, about the ships lying in the harbor of Gibraltar and 
the harbor traffic of Gibraltar during the latter half of August, and 
about the British emergency measures for the relief of congestion at 
South African ports. 



B-1052 



-00- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
7 Sep. 1C42 

VI. Submarine War fare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance over the souther]] rendezvous area was 
lively. 3 messages about the sighting of submarines and one report 
about an attack on a submarine wore intercepted. 

From the American coast one report of a submarine attack in the St. 
Lawrence River and one about sighting a submarine in tho Gulf of St. 
Lawrence were intercepted. A special radio message warned of mines 
in an area off Cane Ilatteras. A message about sighting a submarine off 
the Brazilian coast south of 3ahia does not refer to German submarines. 

2. Own Situation : 

The non-attack order on route "Anton" for the area north of 
20° II was reinstated as of Sep. at 0000, in view of the resumption 
of blockade running operations. 

4 new submarines, newly arrived from home in the Atlantic, are ordered 
to approach quadrant AJ 83 via AK 65. 

A remarkable success was achieved in the St. Lawrence River by sub- 
marine U "165". She observed 2 hits each on 3 steamers of a convoy; 
the steamers may be considered sunk. In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sub- 
marine U "517'* torpedoed 3 steamers; according to radio intercept 
service they were probably sunk, too. 

The submarines of the South Atlantic group located a convoy on a 
northerly course in quadrant CF 6192. During a daylight attack on a 
cruiser escorting this convoy, submarine U "333" was forced to sub- 
merge and assumes the cruiser to be a decoy working with a subchaser 
group . 

The position of "Kirschbluete" at 0200 was 0°, 20° W. 

The Second Admiral, Submarines belatedly reports the sinking on 2 Sep. 
of submarine U "222"; this took place in the course of maneuvers of 
the 27th Submarine Flotilla and followed a collision with, submarine 
U "626". Only the captain, 1 ordnance officer and one petty officer 
were rescued. 

Additional news in V/ar Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

Throughout the day nothing of importance happened. During 
the night of 7 Sep. Bedford was raided; alternate targets were Great 
Yarmouth, Cambridge and Ipswich. 

2. Enemy Incursions ; 

5 of 'the 00 enemy incursions reported during the night of 7 
Sep. penetrated into German territory. For details see Situation, 
North Sea. 



-81- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
7 Sep. 1942 

3. "edit srr:.nean Theater : 

Support of the operations of the Panzer Array. 

4. Eastern Front : 

In 1,000 sorties at the various amy fronts 87 enemy planes 
were shot down by fighter planes, 24 by anti-aircraft artillery; we 
lost 3 planes. Reconnaissance activity over the Black Sea, the Cas- 
pian Sea and the Arctic Ocean. 



III. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, I.'editerranean : 

According to a report fron the Naval Attache at Rone 
originating in diplomatic circles there, information has leaked out 
from the. British Admiralty that a convoy is being assembled to supply 
:.:aita with fuel; the British are determined to bring the convoy through 
regardless of the price. 

llothlllg new was learned about the enemy situation in the entire I.'edi- 
terranean nrea. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : ' 

2 Italian PT boats were in waiting position off Capo Bon in 
the evening. 

2 German PT boats are under way from Suda to Navarino, a third one 
fro:.; Augusta to Naples, 

4t 2030 the Italian shore between Cape dell' Ami and Cape Spartivento 
was under gunfire from enemy submarines; no major damage was reported. 

2 German llaval Command, Italy transmits an account of German suc- 
cesses and losses in the period of 30 Aug. to 5 Sep. and information 
aboi:t the numerical strength of the units of the Panzer Army, Africa 
as of 5 Sep.; this was contained In the daily situation report of the 
Panzer Amy, Africa of 6 Sep. (See Telegram 1950.) 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

The convoy consisting of the motor ships RAVELL0, MANARA, 
SESTRIERE, and ANKARA was attacked by 15 enemy planes on the after- 
noon of 6 Sep. en route from Benghazi. The MANARA was hit by a tor- 
pedo and had to be beached on the coast of Corfu. 

4. Area llaval Group South : 
Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reports that the floating dock sighted on 

" G2 ~ 8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



7 Sep. 1942 



6 Sep. passed southeast of Tuapse In the forenoon. 10 PT boats, 5 
patrol vessels, 1 small steamer and about 50 small vessels were ob- 
served at Gelendzhik. 

According to radio monitoring, the cruiser KRASNY KRIM and the flotilla 
leader KHARKOV were off the central and southern parts of the east 
coast, 1 destroyer and an unidentified ship were west of Tuapse in the 
forenoon, and 2 submarines were in an unidentified position at sea. 

Own Situation ; 

During the night of 5 Sep. Italian subchasers torpedoed a 
steamer lying 10 miles southwest of Anapa. It is possible that this is 
the damaged grounded steamer already reported by the Air Force. 

Mine-searching and sweeping operations proceeded according to plan. In 
the harbor of Mariupol one mine was swept by a mine-sweeping plane. 

2 Rumanian destroyers escorted the tankers ALBARO and CELENO. Trans- 
port and convoy service on schedule. 

A large portion of the town of Anapa has been destroyed by bombs and 
has been evacuated almost completely, A damaged stone pier and a 20 
ton crane can be repaired. 



IX. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A ; 

The ferrying of the 3rd Rumanian Mountain Division to the 
Taman Peninsula is progressing according to plan. German forces are 
mopping up town and outskirts of Novorossisk. The situation at the 
remaining sectors of this Army Group Is unchanged; enemy attacks con- 
tinued and failed completely. 

Army Group B : 

Enemy sorties from Stalingrad were halted. The northern front 
of the XIV Panzer Corps north of Stalingrad was attacked by weak enemy 
forces. Except for 2 local enemy thrusts, no important actions. 

Central Army Group : 

South of Sukhinichi, the enemy followed cautiously our forces 
withdrawn to new lines of defense. The penetration east of Vyazma was 
cleaned up. In the area north of Rzhev a temporary enemy penetration 
was repulsed. An enemy thrust on the western front north of Byeloi was 
unsuccessful. 



-83- B " 1C52 



7 Sep. 1942 

'.orthern Amy Group : 

'.Vest of Kholn successful fighting against partisans behind 
our lines. South of Lake Ladoga fresh German troops gained consider- 
able ground at the point of penetration. 

2. Finnish Front : 

Enemy reconnaissance activity is increasing. 

3. ITorth Africa * 

Our forces have gone over to the defense, making use of ex- 
tensive British mine fields. V.eak enemy thrusts in the southern 
sector were repulsed, llormal gunfire at the northern sector. 



-84- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 
France ; 

The Government protested to the U.S.A. against the bombardment of 
French towns by American aircraft. 

P ortugal : 

The dismissal of Suner is hailed particularly in Portugal, where he 
was considered as an advocate of a single Iberian state, whereas 
Jordana is held friendly to Portugal. However, Lisbon circles are far 
from believing that the reorganization of the Spanish Government is a 
step toward the stabilization of the domestic situation. 

U.S.A. ; 

On 7 Sep. Roosevelt delivered a sensational message to Congress and 
asked for a vote on 1 Oct. on a bill empowering the President to take 
all necessary steps in order to prevent an inflation. Should Congress 
refuse its consent, the President himself would assume the sole re- 
sponsibility for his actions. For details see Political Review No. 
210, paragraph 5. 

The President also discussed this problem in a fire-side chat and on 
this occasion reviewed the war situation. He declared that the Allies 
must concentrate their forces on 4 principal theaters of war; Russia, 
the Middle East, the Pacific, and the front in western Europe , which 
will definitely have to be established in order to defeat Germany. 
About a dozen different locations are suitable for an invasion and a 
successful offensive. All preparations required for such an operation 
have been made in the U.S.A. as well as in Great Britain. 

Another bill sent to Congress reduces the draft age from 20 to 18 
years. 



Special Items 

I. In connection with the interrupted offensive in Egypt, the Deputy 
Admiral, Naval Command, Italy submits the following analysis: 

1. In the Naval Command's opinion there can be no doubt that in the 
last analysis the North African offensive could not be continued be- 
cause of inadequate supply shipments. Thus, unfortunately, the fears 
of this command were realized. 

2. All our efforts in the past to increase supplies to any extent 
failed, and if we use the same methods we cannot expect to achieve re- 
sults in the future either. Now that the offensive has been halted, 
it depends on a solution of the supply problem v/hether the Panzer Army 
will be in a position even to hold its own in the face of an enemy 
whose strength is constantly increasing. 

3. Therefore the problem of supplies absolutely must be solved. The 
first prerequisite for achieving this is to preserve the available 
tonnage; this requires that: 



-E3- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

a. The losses due to enemy action must be reduced to a tolerable 
level. 

b. The unavoidable losses must be replaced. 

4. It is my opinion with regard to point 3 a. that we cannot expect 
to make headway by continuing as in the past to counter enemy opera- 
tions with defensive measures. Even if we can strengthen our sub- 
marine defenses, we are not equipped at present to deal with the 
highly superior skill of the R.A t F. in night operations at sea. This 
situation has reached proportions which must inevitably lead to dis- 
aster unless it can be checked. Today more than ever I can see only 
one possibility, namely by going over to the offensive: The R.A.F. 
in the Central Mediterranean, and that means Malta, must be eliminated. 
At this point we must make a new start immediately. 

The only suggestion the Naval Command, Italy can advance with regard to 
point 3b is that an attempt be made to acquire either neutral or French 
tonnage in spite of all difficulties. The reduction of tonnage at our 
disposal has become a threat which requires that no stone be left un- 
turned. 

The Naval Staff submits this comment to the Permanent Representative 
of the Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters, to the Na- 
val Representative at the Armed Forces High Command Operations Staff, 
and to the Naval Liaison Officers at the Army High Command and the 
Air Force Operations Staff for their information, with the following' 
remark: 

Prospects of reinforcing our submarine defenses effectively are not very 
bright. There are chances for doing something about 3b, following the 
successful conclusion of the negotiations between Kauffmann and Laval. 
Otherwise the Naval Staff agrees with the analysis of the German Na- 
val Command, Italy, insofar as the incomplete information received to 
date permits. 

For exchange of telegrams see l/Skl 1742/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in War Diary, 
Part C, Vol. XIV. 

A detailed analysis of the North African situation by the Naval Staff 
is contained in Telegram l/Skl lb (plan.) 1775/42 Gkdos. Chef s. of 8 
Sep. Copy in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV. 

The analysis ends with the following demand: 

In order to safeguard our position in the Mediterranean, to protect 
Italy, to prevent a planned British offensive, to frustrate the enemy's 
plans for a defensive front, and to create the prerequisites for a 
direct connection between Germany and Japan, the Naval Staff believes 
that the following requirements must be met: 

1. North Africa must be held, if at all possible, from the Alamein 
position. 

2. Our air forces must be greatly reinforced. 

3. Malta must be seized. 

4. The plan of an offensive against Suez at a later date must be 
adhered to. 






-& 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

Until further notice this viewpoint is not to be passed 
on. 

II. As anticipated by the German Admiral at Tokyo, the Japanese Navy, 
after inspecting the DOGGERBANK, requested 3 each of the G7a and G7e 
type torpedoes, and TMB and TKC type mines, as well as instructions in 
their use by the DOGGERBANK 'S crew. 

This matter is being examined. 

III. As on similar occasions in the past, the account about the laying 
of the Cape Bon minefield (see War Diary of 27 Aug.) given by Admiral 
Riccardi to the German Naval Attache at Rome is termed incorrect by 
the Commanding Admiral, German Naval Command, Italy. 

After the German Naval Command had protested on 18 Jul. 1942 against 
laying mines without timing devices and for no urgent operational 
reason, the Italians cancelled the operation which had been scheduled 
for the evening of 18 Jul. Subsequently the Italian Naval High Command, 
accepting the German viewpoint, planned a minefield with timing de- 
vices set for 48 hours, which was to be laid if there was acute danger 
of enemy forces breaking through the Strait of Sicily. This fact was 
known and both sides had agreed on this step. When the British convoy 
in the western Mediterranean got under way, this barrage was laid ac- 
cording to plan timed for 72 hours. No German authority interfered 
with this step in any way; on the contrary, when the British convoy 
approached, a confirmation was demanded that the measure agreed upon 
had actually been executed. As far as could be ascertained on our part, 
the Italians themselves have no reliable data to support Admiral Ric- 
cardi 's claim that 3 steamers of the convoy ran into the newly es- 
tablished minefield. 

The Naval Staff sends the following remark to the Naval Attache at Rome, 
with copy to the German Naval Command, Italy: 

1. Admiral Riccardi 's account that the laying of the minefield in 
French territorial waters was to be cancelled at the request of the 
Commander in Chief, Navy shortly prior to the beginning of the British 
convoy operation, is incorrect. 

2. On the contrary, the Naval Staff had consented on 11 Aug. 1942 to 
the Italian plan suggesting that timing devices be adjusted for 72 
hours instead of 48 hours. 

3. The Naval Staff had suggested the preparation and the laying of 
such a minefield in the event that the enemy's intention was recognized 
to break through the Strait of Sicily with considerable forces, an op- 
eration which, if successful, could upset the strategic situation in the 
Mediterranean. When Italian authorities wanted to lay the minefield 
around the middle of July for reasons not considered sufficient by the 
Naval Staff, the latter opposed such action at that time. 

4. You are requested to look up the details of this matter at the 
German Naval Command, Italy, which receives a copy of the above. 

IV. The Fleet Command reports: The Commander in Chief, Air Force feels 
unable to assign operational forces to the training units for partici- 
pation in the Navy's maneuvers scheduled for the period of 1 Oct. to 

3 Oct. 1942. Due to the situation at the front, operational units can- 
not be spared. The training units themselves do not have sufficient 
fuel at this moment to fulfill their own duties. The Commander in Chief, 
Air Force will take up the matter again later. 



-El- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

The Fleet requests the Naval Staff to approach the Commander in 
Chief, Air Force once more and to see that at least a small fleet 
force as well as the training units of the Air Force can take part 
in the maneuvers. The 5th Air Force also places great value on the 
planned maneuvers and proposes that the planes which are now being 
reequipped at the Rechling testing station be used for this purpose. 
(See Telegram 1300.) 

The Naval Staff Operations Division will try to arrange this. 



Situation 


; 8 


Ser. 


1942 


I . War 


in 


Fore: 


Lgp V. r aters 



1. Enemy Situation : 

The U.S. Navy uses groups composed of ships of different 
size and type instead of groups of uniform type. These groups are 
named "task forces" and consist of "task groups" subdivided into 
"task units". 

In the South Pacific Task Force "23" and Task Group "1" with Task 
Unit "16", also the Task Groups "4", "6", and "9™ have been observed 
so far. They are operating in the Recife-Freetown-Capetown-Monte- 
video area, Recife being their main base. One of their principal 
tasks is the protection of AS convoys part of which proceed to the 
Middle East. The task force consists presumably of the following 
ships: OMAHA, CINCINNATI, MILWAUKEE, MEMPHIS, SOMERS, JOUETT, DAVIS, 
WINSLOW, BALCH, MOFFETT, SAMPSON, GREENE. 

So far, only a few have been observed in the Pacific. 

Those stationed in India and Australia are known to be Task Forces 
"41" and "42", the latter forming the escort of a GP convoy, and "44" 
which is engaged in escort duty for PG, CO, and ZK convoys. Among 
others, the 4th Destroyer Squadron and the 7th and 9th Destroyer 
Division are comronents of these task forces. 

Neutrals ; 

As reported by the Argentine Foreign Ministry, 23 officers and 107 
petty officers and men have escaped from the total of 1,-044 interned 
crew members of the GRAF SPEE. 

2. Own Situation : 

Etappe Tokyo relays objections by the captain of the 
REGENSBURG against the sailing instructions from point "Rose" to 
point "Registerbehoerde", based on his observations on the outbound 
voyage that enemy shipping is concentrated in the area between 23° 
and 25° S, 90O and 75° E. He suggests that the REGENSBURG proceed 
from the Sunda Strait via point "Rose" to 32° S 96° E and then head 
straight for point "Revierfahrt". (See Telegram 1954.) 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo is informed by Telegram 2350 that the 
Japanese Naval High Command's permission for ship "10" to attack 
enemy shipping while proceeding to the Sunda Strait arrived through 



88- 8 - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



8 Sep. 1942 



the Japanese Naval Attache at Berlin simultaneously with the communi- 
cation* of the Naval Attache, Tokyo to that effect. Ship "10" will 
reach the position 13° S, 105° E on 20 Sep. and will proceed from 
there to the Sunda. Strait. This point was chosen by the Japanese 
Naval High Command. 

With regard to the fuel supply of ship "10" while in Japan, the Naval 
Attache at Tokyo was informed by the Operations Division, Naval Staff 
by way of the Armed Forces High Command, Foreign Intelligence Division 
Section IV that the ship will need only 6,000 tons of gas oil, since 
she can probably use 3,000 tons of any cojnmercial grade Diesel oil. 
The Etappe is to be advised to place approximately 200 tons of this 
fuel at the disposal of the captain for trials immediately upon arrival 
of ship "10". (See Letter 1808.) 

Instructions regarding permission to attack enemy shipping on the 
voyage to Japan, effective immediately, and order to be at 13° S 
105° E on 20 Sep. are transmitted to ship "10" by Radiogram 1156. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance revealed 3 light cruisers, 3 destroyers, 
and 1 patrol vessel off Start Point at 1930; at 2300 a convoy was ob- 
served east of the Isle of Wight. Radio monitoring located about 20 
different ships at sea in the Devonport area, including mine sweepers, 
subchasers, motor gunboats and the PRINCE ALBERT; also the LOCUST which 
took part in the Dieppe raid. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

Blockade runner WESERLAND sailed on schedule. The weather 
forecast for 9 Sep. predicts a visibility of 10 miles for the waters 
between Santander and Cape Ortegal and intermittent fog close to the 
shore. 

The UCKERMARK and SPICHERN are scheduled to sail in the evening of 9 
Sep. 

Channel Coast : 

Steamer S0LGLIMT, proceeding in convoy, was engaged at 0325 
off Cherbourg by 2 British motor gunboats which were driven off by 
escorting mine sweepers. There were 2 dead, Including the fleet sur- 
geon, 5 severely and 7 slightly wounded on mine sweeper M "10", caused 
by 2 cm shell hits from the S0LGLIMT. At' 0347 the convoy was attacked 
off Etaples by enemy motor gunboats which had been lying in wait. 
They succeeded in dodging 6 torpedoes. Although the action lasted more 
than an hour, our ships suffered no serious damage or losses. 

During the night of 7 Sep. mine-laying operation "Ranke" and the min- 
ing mission of the 5th PT Boat Flotilla in quadrants BF 2384 and 2387 
were carried out according to plan. For short report of the 5th PT 
Boat Flotilla see Telegram 1035. 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

Torpedo operations of the 2nd, 4th, and 6th PT Boat Flotillas against 
enemy convoys achieved no results. Upon returning to base these 
flotillas had a brush with enemy forces. For short reports of the 
flotillas see Telegrams 1145 and 1705. 

Special Item : 

A British periodical published a picture of a German PT boat flying the 
British war flag in the British service. In the opinion of the Com- 
mander, PT Boats, not a single German PT boat is in enemy possession. 
The picture may concern S "111" which was briefly towed by British 
motor gunboats on 15 Mar. 1942. For the comment of the Commander, PT 
Boats see l/Skl 22175/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. lib. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : ^ 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : » 

Enemy air activity north of the 'Vest Frisian Islands during 
the night of 7 Sep. Low-flying planes reached Heligoland and Norderney. 
Mine-laying off the Ems River mouth is suspected. 1 plane was shot 
down off Terschelling. It is belatedly reported that 1 British aerial 
mine was swept on 7 Sop. 

The Swedish steamer TYNNIKGOE, proceeding in convoy 339 sank after 
striking a mine in quadrant AN 8331. Convoy 1902 was unsuccessfully 
bombed in quadrant AN 8239. The SCHLESV-IG-IIOLSTEIN is transferring 
from Wilhe lms haven to Cuxhaven. Otherwise nothing to report. 

The Commander in Chief, Air Force requested the Naval Staff to give 

orders that the Air Force, Group Command Central Area be informed about 

convoys including Sv/edish ships in the area of the Commanding Admiral, 

Defenses, North because Swedish shipping circles have again complained 

of lacking fighter protection. ( 

2. Norway : 

A fjord boat leaving Petsamo was unsuccessfully fired on by a 
Russian battery on Rybachi Peninsula on 6 Sep. Enemy pianos raided 
Havningsberg on 6 and 7 Sep. A harbor patrol boat collided with a mine 
sweeper off Haugesund and sank. Transports and convoy service according 
to plan. 

Group North maintains its opposition to an EMF barrage In Vest Fjord as 
suggested by the Commanding Admiral, Norway (see War Diary of 4 Sep.) 
and requests consideration whether a minefield against surface forces 
should not be laid in the closed area of Vardoe. (See Telegram 1323.) 



9f)_ B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

3. Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation : 

According to a decoded radio message of 0639 an office of the 
Arctic fleet now located in t\e vicinity of Pechora harbor, probably 
at Naryan Mar, is to be transferred to Belushya Bay (Novaya Zemlya) 
on 10 Sep. 

Air reconnaissance revealed the presence of 2 cruisers, 3 destroyers, 5 
or 6 large steamers, 1 tanker, and 10 small merchant ships or patrol 
vessels at Hval Fjord at 1620. The roadstead of Reykjavik was empty. 

At 2015 a convoy of 12, probably even more, steamers escorted by 1 
cruiser and 4 destroyers, sailing on a 10° course, was sighted in quad- 
rant AE 1480 (Denmark Strait). At 1830 1 heavy cruiser and 2 destroyers 
on a northerly course were observed in quadrant AE 28 and at 2015 1 
cruiser and 4 destroyers escorting 12 steamers in quadrant AE 1479. 

The latter cannot be identical with the steamers reported 
in Hval Fjord at 1620. (Distance about 220 miles.) 

Re-examination of a reconnaissance photo revealed that the aircraft 
carrier seen in Seydis Fjord and identified on 7 Sep. as the ARGUS is 
actually an airplane tender similar to the LAirGLEY (a converted 
steamer ) . 

According to photo reconnaissance of 6 Sep., approximately 20 ships were 
at Iokanga, 6 of them steamers of 3,000 GRT each. Visual reconnaissance 
on 8 Sep. showed 3 steamers of that size. 3' steamers of 3,000 GRT on 
an easterly course under escort of 2 destroyers and 1 patrol vessel were 
observed between Kanin Nos and Kolguyev in; the afternoon of 7 Sep. To- 
day at noon 4 steamers of 3,000 to 4,000 GRT each were in Kola Bay. 

Own Situation : 

The Naval Staff informed the Naval Representative of the 
Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command, the Permanent Representa- 
tive of the Commander in Chief, Navy at Fuehrer Headquarters, and the 
Naval Representative on the Air Force Operations Staff about the 
probable sailing dates and daily runs of convoys PQ 18 and QP 14, as 
learned from decoded radio communications of 7 Sep. 

Considering the TIRPITZ'S state of combat readiness, the Commanding Ad- 
miral, Cruisers proposes to the Admiral, Arctic Ocean, with copy to 
Group North and the Naval Staff, to let this battleship as well as the 
SCKEER take part in the attack on the QP convoy, which would assure us 
of a maximum of striking power. In this case the Commanding Admiral, 
Cruisers would direct the action from aboard the TIRPITZ. The proposal 
is supported by the Fleet. 

Group North points out that this proposal should have been made through 
the proper channels and should have been submitted to the Group, via the 
Admiral, Arctic Ocean. 

Group North assumes that convoy PQ 18 will be south of Jan Mayen on 10 
Sep. at approximately 10° W, not 10° E, and v/ill proceed to Novaya 
Zemlya by daily runs of 200 miles along latitude 76°, a little to the 
south of Spitsbergen; thence along the island's west coast via Kanin 
Nos to Archangel. It will reach Novaya Zemlya probably between 10 and 16 
Sep. According to this, the convoy must have sailed from Reykjavik on 7 



9J- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

Sep. and must be in Denmark Strait on 8 Sep. 

It is anticipated that convoy QP 14 will sail from Kanin Nos on 12 or 
13 Sep. and thus meet convoy PQ 18 off Novaya Zemlya on 15 or 16 Sep. 
It should be off Spitsbergen by 18 or 19 Sep. If this assumption is 
correct, the forces escorting convoy PQ, 18 will return westward with 
convoy QP 14 and the heavy covering force will remain in its waiting 
position west of the line Bear Island-Spitsbergen until convoy QP 14 
has passed. 

Group North reasons that these circumstances will make it very difficult 
for surface forces to close in on either of the convoys; it could, how- 
ever, be accomplished if the attack on QP 14 were made over the shortest 
possible approach from the North Cape area during the night. The at- 
tack would then take place approximately somewhat to the east of the 
Bear Island-Spitsbergen line. In the Group's opinion attacks by sub- 
marines and the Air Force have the best prospects of success. 

The Group contemplates the following measures: 

a. A surface attack on convoy QP 14 will be attempted by the 
SCHEER, HIPPER, KOELN, and 5 destroyers. Their transfer to Alta Fjord 
under the tactical command of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers will be 
timed so that the operation can start from there any time after the 
evening of 11 Sep. The over-all command of the operations against both 
convoys will be in the hands of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean. The ships 
will leave Alta Fjord when Group North issues the code word "Keisen- 
balz". ■ k 

b. Repairs on the TIRPITZ are to be so arranged that she will be 
ready for 27 knots on 12 hour notice. After completion of repairs 
(expected on 14 Sep.), and after the start of "Keisenbalz" she will be 
on 3 hour readiness. 

c. In view of the restrictions imposed, it appears unlikely that 
a situation will arise which will call for the commitment of the TIR- 
PITZ. However, if this necessity arises, she will be escorted by a 
destroyer and the torpedo boats T "9" and "12". 

The 5th Air Force is requested to take over the following tasks, besides 
its normal reconnaissance activity: 

a. To reinforce the fighter defense of Alta Fjcrd following the 
arrival of the forces of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers. 

b. During operation "Meisenbalz" reconnaissance missions are to 
be flown as directed by the Admiral, Arctic Ocean. 

c. To advise the bomber squadrons that it is particularly im- 
portant and necessary for the success of the attack of our forces that 
the enemy escort forces be put out of commission. 

The Naval Staff has this to say about the above directives: 

(1) Since the waters between 30° and 60 0, E are free of ice far to the 
north, it is not unlikely that the heavy covering force will proceed 
eastward beyond the Bear Island-Spitsbergen line in view of its opera- 
tional range. 



B-1052 

92- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

(2) It can be assuned that the escort of both convoys will be at a 
minimum between Novaya Zemlya and the coast of Kola Peninsula. In this 
section the naval escort will be replaced by air protection and nothing 
definite is known about the latter' s strength. Along the remaining 
route the escorting forces can be assumed to be concentrated first on 
convoy PQ 18 and later on convoy QP 14. 

(3) Particular attention must be paid to tankers; in previous opera- 
tions they enabled even light forces to take part in the action by re- 
fueling them at sea. It will be useful to inform the 5th Air Force 
about this fact. 

For respective telegrams see l/Skl 1765/42 and 1772/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in 
file "Operation Eispalast". 

The Naval Staff submits the Navy's plans for the operation against con- 
voys PQ 18 and QP 14 to Fuehrer Headquarters, to the Naval Representa- 
tive of the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff and to the Na- 
val Representative on the Air Forces Operations Staff, as follows: 

(1) Submarines will concentrate on convoy PQ 18. 

(2) a. If the enemy situation is favorable, it will be attempted to 
have the SCHEER, HIPPER, KOELN and 5 destroyers attack convoy QP 14. 
For this purpose this task force under the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers 
will be transferred to Alta Fjord so as to be ready for operation on 
the evening of 11 Sep. Code word for start of operation is "Meisen- 
balz". 

b. The TIRPITZ with an escort of 1 destroyer and 2 torpedo boats 
will first be on 12 hour readiness, later on on 2 to 3 hour readiness 
at Narvik. 

(3) Submarines will be directed to such points of the area Iceland- 
Faeroe Islands which according to previous experiences will be passed 
by the heavy covering forces. 

Vice Admiral Krancke is notified that additional data for his report to 
the Fuehrer will follow in due time. 

The Naval Representative at the Air Force Operations Staff Is informed 
also of Group North's demands on the 5th Air Force. 

For telegram see l/Skl I op 1773/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in file "Operation 
Eispalast". 

Group North informs the Commanding Admiral, Submarines that in case 
submarines proceeding to operations areas pass the Iceland-Faroes area 
and could participate temporarily in the operation against the convoys, 
quadrants AE 53, 37, 56, 5931, 93, 96, 99, and 47 are promising loca- 
tions where, according to past experience, heavy enemy naval forces can 
be counted on to appear. 

No reports were received regarding operations "Romanow" and "Zarewitsch". 



S- 



B-1052 



co::fids!.tial 

8 Sep. 1942 

IV, Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to a report of the Admiral, Denmark from a source of 
unknown reliability, the British Naval Attache at Stockholm is said to 
have announced a British air attack on the ferry slip of Helsingoer and 
on ferries which are in operation, in order to cut off the supply of 
Norway. 

The reinforcement of the inadequate anti-aircraft 
defenses has been requested of the Commander, Anti- 
aircraft Defenses, Denmark. 

2. Own Situation : 

Nothing to report from the area of the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea. 

The minefields "Seeigel 30", "31", and "32" in the area of the Commander 
!.'ine Sweepers, Baltic Sea were reinforced according to plan. Mine- 
sweeping was hampered by bad weather. 

Transport and convoy service proceeded on schedule. Leave ship ILLER 
ran aground upon departing from Hangoe. The entire crew and pers'onnel 
on leave are safe. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Radio monitoring revealed ship traffic west of Gibraltar, 
probably in connection with the arrival of ships or of a convoy. 

Lively reconnaissance activity in the southern rendezvous area. 3 re- 
ports from the St. Lawrence River about the sighting of submarines were 
intercepted and from the Gulf of St. Lawrence a message concerning an 
attack by a submarine and the sighting of another. U.S. steamer 
PENNMAR (5,568 GRT ) sent an SSS signal about sighting a submarine 40 
miles east of Halifax. 

2. Own Situation : 

3 more submarines are on . the way to the zone of operations 
from Germany and 1 from a western French base. 

Submarine U "617" sank a 1,500 GRT steamer in quadrant AE 7672 in the 
North Atlantic. No reports regarding the operation against the convoy 
east of the Azores were received today. 

No successes were reported from the U.S. coast. 

Following a report from submarine U "333" which substantiates the 
assumption of a submarine trap in quadrant BE and the northern sector 
of quadrant CF, all submarines are warned once more. 

Group "Eisbaer" is located at present in quadrant FE. The group will re- 
ceive supplies after 20 Sep. 






+24- S" 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

Due to the Japanese Navy's demand for a reduction of the German area of 
operation in the Indian Ocean, the planned transfer there of the auxili- 
ary cruisers operating at this time in the eastern part of the South 
Pacific cannot take place. For the time being ship "28" is ordered to 
quadrant HIT where she will not interfere with the operation of Group 
"Eisbaer". It is planned for a later date to authorize operations in 
the area between 15° W and west of a line running from quadrant GR 89 
to quadrant FE 91 via St. Helena. After arriving in the Capetown area, 
Group "Eisbaer" can therefore be permitted to attack single ships east 
of the above line only. At present ship "23" operates in the South 
Atlantic west of longitude 15 W. 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines is being informed of this situation 
and is requested to report the dates and rendezvous points with supply 
ships as well as their route instructions in order to allow sufficient 
time to coordinate the requirements of auxiliary cruisers and sub- 
marines. 

For copy of directive to this effect see 1/Skl Iu 1764/42 Gkdos. Chefs, 
in War Diary, Part C, Vol. IV. 

For further information see supplementary submarine situation reoort in 
War Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 

The same report contains an analysis of the prospects of future sub- 
marine warfare by the Naval Staff Operations Division, Submarine Section; 
it climaxes in the demand that construction of offensive and defensive 
submarine weapons must speedily be adapted to cope with present develop- 
ments which are already gravely threatening to limit submarine opera- 
tions. The most serious thought is being given this matter by the Na- 
val Staff. It is imperative to exploit all means which may help to 
boost the effectiveness of the submarines. Nothing must be neglected 
in order to convince the authorities of the Armed Forces and of arma- 
ments production that submarine warfare must be given everything it 
needs without any restriction and, most of all, without any further de- 
lay, since submarine warfare is the only effective weapon at our dis- 
posal to fight the enemy naval powers. The Naval Staff never enter- 
tained any doubt that naval warfare alone can force Great Britain and 
the U.S.A. to make peace. The Naval Staff is thus compelled to judge 
all other efforts solely from one angle, namely to what degree they 
will benefit naval and primarily submarine warfare against enemy 
shipping. It must and will relentlessly demand that all war planning 
be done with this situation in mind and that all conclusions be drawn 
immediately from the inescapable fact that the strongest purely con- 
tinental power can at best hold its own in the face of naval powers, but 
never impose its will on them. Utmost vigilance is imperative as soon 
as the first indications become apparent that the most powerful weapon 
of naval warfare, the submarine is being rendered ineffective by im- 
proved enemy defense methods. With this thought uppermost, the Naval 
Staff is tackling the acute problems by which it is confronted and 
which require a thorough investigation of the possibilities of making 
submarine warfare more effective. 



VI. Aerial Warfar e 

1 . British Isles and Vici n ity : 

During the day and night of 8 Sep. small forces raided several 
localities in southern England. Propaganda leaflets were dropped over 
Portsmouth and Southampton. 



•51- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

2. Incur si ens : 

140 enemy planes flew into southwestern Germany, concentrat- 
ing on Ruesselsheim. For damage at Ruesselsheim (Opel Works), Frank- 
furt on Main, Mainz, etc., see daily situation report. 

3. Mediterranean Theater ; 
Nothing to report. 

4. Eastern Front : 

121 enemy planes were shot down on the various army sectors. 
Reconnaissance activity in the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea and the 
Arctic Ocean. A small force attacked Murmansk. 

5. Special Item : 

The Operations Staff, Air Force agrees to the request of the 
Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, Fleet Branch concerning the im- 
mediate training of 5 sailors and the allocation of 2 model 330 Focke ' 
Achgelis autogyro lookout kites so that one ship may be equipped with 
them at once. (See Telegram 2040.) 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean : 

The warship situation at Gibraltar remained essentially un- 
changed. According to intelligence reports from Spain, about 50 small 
vessels (subchasers, trawlers, tugs, patrol vessels, and landing barges) 
are at the pier. The transport LEINSTER sailed during the night of 7 
Sep. for an unknown destination. 

4 submarines were reported sighted in the central Mediterranean. No 
other ships were reported sighted in the Mediterranean. Reconnaissance 
and bomber plane activity was reported by air reconnaissance. A number 
of messages concerning reconnaissance and air attacks on convoys and 
destroyer escorts were intercepted. 

According to a communique of the British Admiralty, submarines definitely 
sank 5 large merchant ships and 2 medium sized vessels during the last 
weeks apart from the successes achieved by the Royal Air Force and the 
Na val Air Force. In addition, 3 vessels were damaged by submarines. 

2 . Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

2 German PT boats sailed from Navarino and 4 from Suda for 
Augusta. 

An Italian subchaser reported on 7 Sep. sinking an enemy submarine off 
the Peloponnesian west coast. ' 

Enemy planes raided Tobruk on the evening of 6 Sep. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

The RAVELLO and SESTRIERE arrived at Benghazi at noon, the 



96|- B - 10 " 



> 



CONFIDENTI AL 
8 Sep. 1942 

ANKARA and auxiliary vessel BRIONI at Tobruk. At 0600 the ANKARA was 
unsuccessfully attacked by enemy bombers. The escort destroyer 
FTTCILIERE was damaged. 

Other convoys proceeded according to plan without interference. 

Special Item ; 

The Naval Staff advises the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command, 
with copy to the German Naval Command, Italy, about its stand on the 
reply of the Italian High Command to the Operations Staff, Armed Forces 
High Command of 7 Aug. regarding the closing of the Sicily Strait. The 
German Naval Command, Italy is advised of the Naval Staff's agreement 
with the plans submitted for the execution of the measure. For copy 
see 1/Skl I E 22169/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIII. 

4. Area Naval Group South ; 

Aegean Sea : 

Check-sweeping of the Cerigotto Strait, where mines are sus- 
pected, brought no result. 

Otherwise nothing to report. 

Special Item; 

The Naval Construction Division reports with regard to the demands of 
Group South and the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, Fleet Branch 
concerning the construction of anti-submarine vessels for the Aegean 
Sea; Auxiliary ship DRACHE and 4 subchasers will be completed at 
Trieste on 24 Sep. and 24 Oct. respectively. The contemplated con- 
struction of armed trawlers at Skararaandka could not be begun due to 
lack of labor, although lumber and steel have been available for some 
time. The Naval Construction Division is therefore using the Varna 
shipyards, where 24 armed trawlers are to be constructed between 
September 1942 and April 1943 and 18 more between April and August 1943. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

On 7 and 8 Sep. movements of light forces and the floating 
dock in tow were observed by reconnaissance planes off the east coast 
in the Tuapse and Adler area. According to photo reconnaissance, the 
following ships were at Batum on 7 Sep.: The hull of a warship, 2 
cruisers, 1 torpedo boat, 1 mine sweeper, 4 submarines, 2 PT boats, 6 
tankers, 9 steamers, and 1 floating crane. At Potl on the same day: 
1 battleship, 1 warship hull, 2 heavy cruisers, 1 training ship, 6 
destroyers, 2 of which were in dock, 16 submarines, 2 of which in dock, 
5 motor mine sweepers, 5 PT boats, 13 steamers, etc. ■ 

Lively shipping activity was observed in the Caspian Sea and between 
Astrakhan and Stalingrad. For details see daily situation report. 

Own Situation ; 

During the night of 6 Sep. the 1st PT Boat Flotilla was de- 
ployed between Tuapse and Sochi, Italian subchasers between Novorossisk 
and Gelendzhik for torpedo operations. No shipping was encountered. 



97_ B-1052 



CONFIUENTIAL 



8 Sep. 1942 



Otherwise nothing to report, 



VIII. Situation East Asia 

On the basis of information received by the Japanese Naval High 
Command, the German Admiral, at Tokyo reports: 

1. Solomon Islands ; Efforts are being made to destroy enemy planes 
on Guadalcanal. For this purpose air attacks were made on 2 and 5 Sep., 
during which a total of 16 enemy planes was destroyed; the enemy suc- 
ceeded, however, in bringing up replacements. On 4 Sep. light enemy 
forces were attacked by destroyers off Guadalcanal. 1 destroyer was 
sunk, 1 other destroyer or fairly large warship was likewise sunk. On 

6 Sep. a Japanese submarine sighted 1 aircraft carrier, 2 cruisers, and 
several destroyers south of Paulo Island at 13° 00' S 162° 00' E. 2 
torpedo hits were scored on the carrier but the sinking net observed. 
Japanese Army forces on Guadalcanal were reinforced. An early offen- 
sive, aiming primarily at the airfield, may be anticipated. 

2. New Guinea : A Japanese landing attempt at Rabi (Milne Bay) en- 
countered strong enemy resistance. The situation at this moment is un- 
favorable to the Japanese, owing to enemy air superiority, the presence 
of enemy tanks and difficulties of terrain. Nevertheless, additional 
landing attempts may be made. 

3. Aleutians : A Japanese submarine sighted several cruisers and 
destroyers north of Umulak on 3 Sep. A submarine which penetrated into 
Nazan Bay (Umulak Island) on 4 Sep. scored a torpedo hit on a heavy 
enemy cruiser. The result was not observed. 



IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

Heavy fighting continues in the Novorossisk area, 
enemy attacks at the Terek River, both sides of Mozdok. 

Army Group B : 



Strong 



After regrouping, tank and motorized Infantry units launched 

a new attack on Stalingrad. The enemy is undertaking massed sorties 

and diversionary attacks on the northern sector of the XIV Panzer Corps, 
all of which were repulsed. 

Central Army Group : 

Strong enemy tank formations brought up via Kaluga and Kozelsk, 
advancing in southwesterly direction, indicate impending attacks in the 
area south of Sukhinichi. A strong enemy attack is under way east of 
Vyazma. Fighting on a small scale is going on in the Rzhev area. 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
8 Sep. 1942 

Northern Army Group ; 

The demarkation line between the 18th and the 11th Armies runs 
from Trossno to Maluksa. The 11th Army is north of this line. South 
of Lake Ladoga and in the Leningrad area the enemy continued to attack 
in some sectors. 

2. Finnish Front : 
Nothing to report. 

3. North Africa : 

No situation report has been received as yet. 



I 



I 



-B 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 194P 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain : 

On 8 Sep. Churchill addressed the House of Commons, giving for the 
first time after a long interval an account of the situation. Among 
other things, he discussed the convoy which got through to Malta in 
August, and declared: "The convoy and its escort suffered heavy 
losses. 1 British aircraft carrier, 2 cruisers, and 1 destroyer were 
sunk and other ships damaged; however, this price was not too high in 
view of the result achieved, because it is of greatest importance for 
the situation of the entire Middle East that Malta be in a position to 
interfere effectively with the enemy communications to Libya and Egypt.** 

Churchill termed the raid on Dieppe forced reconnaissance, an action 
which is necessary before operations on a larger scale can be in- 
augurated. 

The cruiser SHROPSHIRE is allocated to Australia to take the place of 
the CANBERRA which was sunk during the battle of the Solomon Islands. 

The Allies continue to exercise air superiority. The daylight bomb- 
ings by the U.S. Air Force, which are made from great altitude and with 
remarkable aim, are a new factor, the importance of which is increasing. 

Merchant shipping losses are still very grave, but a distinct improve- 
ment can be noticed since July. It is credited to the perfection of 
the convoy system off the American coast. The last two convoys to 
Malta and Russia increased the losses considerably. However, con- 
struction of new merchant vessels lately exceeded the number of sink- 
ings. Recently the fight against submarines has become more success- 
ful than ever before. Of great importance also was the bombing of 
German shipyards used for the construction of submarines. 

Naval warfare is the basis for all Allied efforts. 

Churchill then discussed the Egyptian situation and the shift of high 
command posts which became necessary in this theater. Roosevelt lent 
ships in order to transport an additional 40,000 to 50,000 men. to the 
Middle East. "Excellently equipped troops have arrived by way of the 
Cape of Good Hope; and it was possible to send them directly to Egypt, 
so that the defense of this country will be ensured during the coming 
months . " 

"Rommel's offensive was blocked because many of his supply ships were 
sunk by submarines. Since his position thus became difficult, he 
launched a major offensive on 31 Aug. which started rolling at the very 
moment v/hen all British defense preparations had been completed. The 
attack was repulsed primarily because of British numerical superiority 
of guns and tanks." 

"The organization of the 10th Army (Iran and Iraq) has made good pro- 
gress; particularly its air force has been reinforced. It will pos- 
sibly be able to lend assistance to the left Russian flank, but in any 
event will defend Iraq." 

The Prime Minister also spoke about his visit to Moscow: 

"The results of the Moscow talks cannot be divulged. The Russians are 
of the opinion that neither the British nor the Americans have done 
enough to ease their burden. We were impressed, however, by the Russian 



r 1 E-1052 

-LOO- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

leaders' confidence in our loyal determination to come to their support* 

In concluding, Churchill characterized the situation as tremendously 
improved during the last 2 years. Allied with the greatest nations, 
Great Britain is on the path to total victory. Germany is hated in all 
European countries more than any nation had ever been hated within the 
annals of history. The hour of liberation will be the hour of retalia- 
tion. 

The debate following the speech was brief and drew little participation 
from the House. 

For a complete report see Political Review No. 211. 

Churchill's statements ought to be studied carefully in 
the original. They offer valuable hints for an analysis 
of the present situation. See note in War Diary, Part 
B, Vol. V. 

The council of the British trade unions, now in session, expressed con- 
fidence in Churchill. A motion for the admission of communists was de- 
feated by a vote of 2,500,000 against 2,100,000. 

In a speech, Smuts termed the Mediterranean basin the most important 
theater of war. The resources of the Allies are threatened and all 
their efforts will be in vain if the enemy is not driven out of North 
Africa. 

Turkey : 

Pressure exerted by the British and U.S. Ambassadors in order to achieve 
the repeal of the stipulations of the Montreux Convention, thus permit- 
ting Russian warships free passage through the Dardanelles, failed to 
accomplish this purpose. 



Special Items ; 

I. A. The Deputy Chief, Naval Staff Quartermaster Division in- 
formed the Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff on 8 Sep. as follows t 
Vice Admiral Krancke telephoned that the Fuehrer has again expressed his 
opinion that all ships suitable for Norway are to be transferred there. 

B. The Fuehrer's viewpoint supports the Naval Staff's plans re- 
garding assignments for the surface forces during the winter. Since the 
Fuehrer is also apparently influenced by the possibility of enemy op- 
erations against the Norwegian coast, the question of whether the NUERN- 
BERG should be used in Norway in spite of existing limitations is 
answered automatically. 

C. In a conference between the Chief, Operations Division, Naval 
Staff and the Deputy Chief, Quartermaster Division, Naval Staff, the 
Operations Division, Naval Staff agreed to the replacement of the KOELN 
by the EMDEN, notwithstanding the latter' s lower speed and inferior anti- 
aircraft equipment. The EMDEN is actually the only seaworthy German 
cruiser; she can be used in Norway, however, only following final tests 
of the newly installed degaussing gear. 

II. A. With reference to the plans for a new battleship, the Fuehrer 
reiterated his demand for larger caliber guns. 



Hi- 



fi- 105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



9 Sep. 1942 



In this connection the Naval Staff Operations Division recapitulates 
briefly its own demands applying to a ship of this type: 

B. The main object is to increase the offensive power of type 
"H 41" by using higher caliber guns. All other specifications should 
be retained, if possible, in order to avoid an undesirable increase of 
the ship's displacement. 

By means of her superior armament the ship must be able also in diffi- 
cult situations to defeat adversaries which are otherwise her equals. 
"Difficult situations" exist when the ship is simultaneously subjected 
to air attacks, the weather is unfavorable (poor visibility, heavy 
s"eas ) , the ship has been on operations for a long time and has little 
hope for an early return to base, etc. 

In other respects, as for instance armor, speed, and range of operation, 
the ship is to follow the specifications for model "H 41". 

C. The Naval Staff Operations Division is of the opinion that 
the increase of displacement which goes with the increased caliber of 
the main guns must be held to a minimum. Otherwise the armament of the 
ship need not be increased in proportion to the increased gun caliber; 
it is rather to be maintained as heretofore. Furthermore, attempts 
should be made to make up for the increased weight of the guns by sav- 
ings applied to other equipment, if not in full at least as much as 
possible. Theoretically this could be applied as follows: 

(a) Weight of engines, resulting in a reduction of speed. 

(b) Fuel supply, resulting in a reduction of range. 

(c) Armor and under-water protection, resulting in reduced re- 
sistance. 

(d) Remaining armament, 'resulting In reduced striking power. 

Re (a) The Naval Staff Operations Division cannot concede 
a further reduction of speed, which has already 
been lowered to 28 knots by measures recently taken 
(protection of ammunition chambers against bombs). 



Re (b) It is assumed that no considerable saving of weight 
can be achieved by reducing the fuel supply to a 
level corresponding to a range for example of 
18,000 miles at an average speed of 19 knots. Even 
if bases were available to us in foreign waters, 
a range of 20,000 miles at a speed of 19 knots 
would still be required, so that concessions in 
this respect could be made only if they would re- 
sult in a very considerable gain. This question 
requires a thorough examination. 



Re (c) A reduction of armor thickness or a lessening of 

protection cannot be advocated by the 
Operations Division; it is willing, 
forego an increase of these factors 
.on to the greater gun caliber. Speci- 
>ased on those planned heretofore for 
considered adequate and offer sufficient 
the final calculations. 



under -water 
Naval Staff 
however, to 
in proportic 
fications bi 
"H 41" are 
leeway for 



&- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

Re (d ) (1) The caliber of the main guns has been fixed. 
The number of guns and their disposition must 
afford maximum fighting efficiency. 

(2) The amount of anti-aircraft artillery must be 
maintained as heretofore. 

(3) The importance of retaining efficient second- 
ary guns is accentuated by the following conclu- 
sions: The main guns are an "expensive" affair in 
view of ammunition requirements and wear and tear 
on the gun barrels. Their use must be limited to 
worthwhile targets and cannot be justified for 
fighting light cruisers and destroyers. 

(4) It is therefore imperative that the secondary 
guns and the heavy anti-aircraft guns be of 
different caliber and be placed according to 
weight. 

(5) A thorough examination of the problem of 
whether the secondary guns should be mounted in 
casemates or turrets might result in saving 
weight. 

(6) Torpedo equipment cannot be dispensed with. 

D. The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division is requested to take 
the above conclusions into account in working out the plans for "H 41" 
in consultation with the Naval Construction Division and the Naval 
Ordnance Division and to report to the Naval Staff Operations Division 
about any further steps in this connection. 

III. Field Marshal Kesselring's report to Mussolini of 7 Sep., as re- 
lated by the German. General attached to the Italian High Command, re- 
veals the following picture of the situation: 

a. The Alamein line is to be held under all circumstances. 

b. It is still planned to resume the offensive as soon as the 
supply situation and the strength of our forces will permit. The 
Egyptian front is gaining importance in connection with the pressure on 
the Middle East from the Caucasus. 

c. Due to weather conditions, Malta cannot be captured sooner 
than before next summer. Thus the only way to safeguard the transport 
of supplies to North Africa is to neutralize Malta by increasing our 
air forces. 

d. Additional steps for more efficient convoy protection by 
closer cooperation between naval and air forces are to be considered 
during conferences between the Commanding General, Armed Forces South, 
and the Italian High Command. 

e. Field Marshal Kesselring plans to report on 8 Sep. to the 
Commander in Chief, Air Force and to the Fuehrer at the Fuehrer's Head- 
quarters. 

The Naval Staff's views on this matter can be found in 
War Diary of 8 Sep. 



&- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

IV. The Italian Admiral attached to the Naval Staff requested the 
British operations order for the Dieppe action. The Operations Staff, 
Arned Forces High Command agrees to the Naval Staff's proposal to com- 
ply with this request. 



Situation 9 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

South Atlantic : 

According to an intelligence report the MALAYA and WARSPITE 
with 4 destroyers have been at Freetown since 7 Sep. 

As far as the MALAYA is concerned, the report is 
evidently erroneous, since this battleship was observed 
at Gibraltar by the Intelligence Center, Spain. The 
RAMILLIES was probably mistakenly identified as the 
MALAYA. 

Indian Ocean : 

According to a source so far unproved, a heavily escorted 
convoy from the U.S. and the British Isles is expected to arrive in 
Egypt via the Cape at the end of September. 

2. Own Situation : 

On 8 Sep. at 2116, ship "28" reported by short signal: "I 
am in large quadrant GQ. Weather at rendezvous point unfavorable. 
Planning to proceed immediately to waiting area "Komponisten" for 
overhaul. Awaiting supply ship." The last garbled group is interpreted: 
meeting point "Schubert". 

The Naval Staff acknowledges receipt with Radiogram 0141. 

The Naval Staff informs ship "10" by Radiogram 0840 that the KULMER- 
LAND left Dairen on 26 Aug. and will pass point "Saale" probably on 
10 Sep., from where she will proceed by way of a point 10° east and 2° 
south of point "Orleans". It is not contemplated to have her meet 
ship "10". 

The poor prospects in the former zone of operation of ship "10" 
were known to the Naval Staff, but had to be accepted in view of the 
delay in learning the Japanese intentions. The Japanese reply to the 
repeated requests concerning the zone of operations was only received 
on 7 Sep. Ship "10" 's request to be dismissed to Japan was granted on 
7 Sep. by Radiogram 1156. " The date of 5 Sep. fixed by Radiogram 0440 
has thus been extended to 20 Sep. Notification to this effect is 
transmitted to ship "10" by Radiogram 2209. 

Ship "23" is informed by Radiogram 2314 that the TANNENFELS will ar- 
rive on 21 Sod. from Japan for the delivery of provisions at a point 
3° south of point "Schubert". She v/ill probably be able to take over 
prisoners. Ship "23" is instructed to dismiss the TANNENFELS to 
Europe upon completion of supply delivery and to report the date of her 
dismissal when convenient. 






04- 



8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 

i 



9 Sep. 1942 



• 



Complying with ship "28"' s request, the TANNENPELS will receive orders 
to be at point "Schubert" every day beginning 18 Sep. The Naval Staff 
has no objection to ship "28" overhauling in the "Komponisten" area; 
she is advised to this effect by Radiogram 1504 and instructed to send 
the TANNENPELS to the rendezvous with ship "23" at a point 3° south of 
point "Schubert" following the delivery of supplies. 

The KULMERLAND is instructed to head from point "Rose" directly to 
point "Kurzwellensender" without touching point "Kurzschluss". See 
Radiogram 1342. 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo is advised that the REGENSBURG is to head 
directly for point "Rechenstab" without touching point "Register- 
behoerde" because the alternate course suggested by her captain would 
come too close to a zone of heavy traffic. See Telegram 2245. 

All ships in foreign waters are advised by Radiogram 0522 about the 
position on 7 Sep. of "KirschblueteV at the equator and 22° W; informa- 
tion about the domestic Spanish situation and the development of 
German-French relations was sent by Radiogram 2147. 

Enemy situation report by Radiogram 0432. 



II.. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, 2 British 
or U.S. light cruisers on an easterly course were sighted between La 
Coruna and Cape Prior. An inquiry at the Spanish Naval Staff de- 
termined that these cannot be Spanish ships. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

The WESERLAND reported at 1716 by short signal from position 
8 W that she had been attacked by planes at 1500. The signal's cod- 
ing seems to Indicate that the vessel is undamaged. 

Group West confirms the report by Radiogram 1929 and adds: "We assume 
that contact was lost and ship is continuing her voyage." 

The UCKERMARK and SPICHERN sailed according to plan. 

As reported by Group West, the PIETRO 0RSE0L0 will definitely be ready 
for operations on 15 Sep. During the first 3 days her speed will be 
16 knots; the continuous speed for the entire voyage will be 14 knots. 

A mine detonation outside the fairv/ay was observed in the inner road- 
stead of St. Nazaire. 

Channel Coast : 

Mine-exploding vessels swept 2 ground mines at point "228" 
on route "Herz". A convoy headed for the Channel Islands was attacked 
by 20 enemy planes between Cape de la Hague and Alderney. 1 motor 
coaster was sunk. Mine-laying operation "Finale" and a mine-laying 



1*5- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

mission of the 5th PT Boat Flotilla are scheduled for the night of 9 
Sep. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy reconnaissance planes flew over the area of the Ems 
River mouth at noon. The Swedish steamer TYNNINGOE which sank on 8 
Sep. was not equipped with degaussing gear nor was she demagnetized, 
but was proceeding in the wake of a mine-exploding vessel. A ground 
mine was swept off Borkum. Convoy and patrol services in the area of 
the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North proceeded according to plan. 

2. Norway : 

Enemy Situation : 

The Japanese Military Attache at Stockholm reports that the 
Swedish General Staff expects an enemy landing in Norway to take place 
during the current year. Apart from British forces, also Norwegian 
and U.S. units are allegedly in readiness for this purpose at Inverness 
in northern Scotland and on the Orkney Islands. 

Air reconnaissance on the approaches to the Norwegian west coast was 
livelier than in recent days. 

Own Situation : 

An enemy air attack on a group of subchasers off Vardoe on 
8 Sep. was unsuccessful. Enemy planes were active on the evening of 
8 Sep. in the west coast area. The destroyers STIINBRINCK and 
ECKOLDT sailed for Narvik from Kirkenes. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway is once more requested to assign mine- 
exploding vessel "181", because vessel "139", the only other one avail- 
able, requires shipyard repairs. I.'ine protection of the fleet 
anchorages and of the approaches in the Narvik and Trondheim areas can 
be furnished reliably only by mine -exploding gear. (See Telegra.- 1300.) 

3. Arctic Ocean s 

Enemy Situation : 

According to air reconnaissance, convoy PQ 18, consisting of 
35 merchant vessels under escort of 1 battleship, 2 cruisers, and 6 
patrol vessels, was located at noon in quadrant AE 1240. Approximately 
at the same time reconnaissance planes reported a force of 1 battle- 
ship, 1 aircraft carrier, and 9 cruisers or destroyers in quadrant AE 
2550 and a force of 1 heavy cruiser and 10 destroyers in quadrant AA 
9710. Both forces were reported apparently on identical courses (330° 
and 340°). In view of the relatively small difference between these 
positions there is a possibility that the forces reported as two are 
actually identical. 

The 5th Destroyer Flotilla sighted a diving submarine in quadrant AC 
7229 at 2326 on 8 Sep. 



, 1 B-1052 

■toi- • 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

Own Situation : 

The 5th Destroyer Flotilla completed operations "Romanow" and 
"Zarewitsch" according to plan. 

In accordance with the new instructions (see War Diary 8 Sep.) the Com- 
manding Admiral, Cruisers transferred from the TIRPITZ to the HIPPER. 

In view of the overall situation, Group North does not anticipate that 
the TIRPITZ will be permitted to take part in the operation on account 
of existing restrictions; the battleship is therefore instructed to 
stand by at Narvik in order to avoid waste of fuel. In accordance with 
the Naval Staff's suggestion, the 5th Air Force is advised by Group 
North that the effectiveness of enemy escort forces will be decisively 
affected if any tankers sailing in convoy PQ 18 are put out of com- 
mission at an early stage. 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines intends to station the 4 submarines 
sailing from Kiel on 10 Sep. in the Denmark Strait approximately in the 
area of quadrants AE 10, AD 20 and farther south to AE 47, where they 
are to intercept convoy QP 14 as suggested by Group North. He there- 
fore requests the Admiral, Arctic Ocean and Group North, with copy to 
the Naval Staff, to forward all air reconnaissance reports speedily and 
continually. 

5 submarines of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean are ordered to take up the 
following 5 positions: quadrants AB 1790, 4210, 4250, the southern 
third of AB 32 and the northern third of AB 35, and the central and 
southern thirds of AB. 

Submarine U "601" belonging to the group of 3 submarines assigned to 
the eastern Arctic Ocean is ordered to assume position in quadrant AT 
north of the entrance to Matochkin Strait by 15 Sep. 

Special Items : 

The Chief of the Naval Liaison Staff, Finland conferred some time ago 
upon his own initiative with the Commander in Chief of the Finnish Navy 
about the possibility of using a number of Finnish submarines for Ger- 
man operations in the Arctic Ocean from bases in northern Norway. 
Finnish Headquarters objected, principally on account of the technical 
inadequacy of Finnish submarines. Group North supported the suggestion 
made by the Chief of the Naval Liaison Staff, Finland to submit the 
matter to the decision of a higher authority. 

The Naval Staff Submarine Division checked on the possibilities of pro- 
viding the necessary replacements and bases and arrived at the follow- 
ing conclusions: 

a. German shipyard workers could only be supplied at the expense 
of repairs of superior German submarines. 

b. Spare parts, machinery, and special supplies are unavailable 
at Finnish shipyards in the quantities required, and since 
some of them were manufactured by German firms, the replace- 
ments would have to come from Germany. This, in turn, would 
put an additional burden on German industry because the parts 
in question are generally not made in mass production. 

c. No difficulties are seen with regard to bases. 



-Lq7- 



B-1052 



CONFIDEHTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

The Naval Staff is convinced that the above-nentioned difficulties are 
not in proportion with the gain which can be expected, all the more 
since the range of operation of the Finnish submarines is small and be- 
cause since they are overaged frequent breakdowns and repairs are 
probable. Besides, 3 submarines of limited usefulness offer no par- 
ticular advantage in view of the number of operational submarines now 
being delivered every month. 

Group North is therefore advised that the idea of using Finnish sub- 
marines in the Arctic Ocean is dismissed. The Chief of Naval Liaison 
Staff, Finland is informed to this effect by way of the Naval Attache. 



IV. Skagerrak, 3altic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

No thing to report from the area of the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea. Minefield "Nashorn 14" was laid according to plan 
in the area of the Commander, Minesweepers, Baltic Sea. 

Mine -searching operations were hampered by bad weather. Convoys and 
transports proceeded according to plan. Steamer LEDA, replacing 
steamer ILLER, sailed from Danzig. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance in the Bay of Biscay was carried out by 
38 planes. 2 reports about sighting submarines were intercepted from 
this area, 3 from the U.S. east coast and 1 from the West Indies. 

According to intelligence reports from Portugal, a British passenger 
plane sighted a convoy of approximately 40 British and U.S. ships on a 
southerly course on the morning of 6 Sep. about 150 miles west of Cape 
St. Vincent; the convoy carried troops and was escorted by 2 aircraft 
carriers, cruisers, and destroyers. 

Moreover, a convoy is expected at Lisbon between 9 and 11 Sep. which 
will reportedly be strongly escorted In view of the German submarines 
operating in Portuguese waters. Several British steamers lying at Lis- 
bon will allegedly sail directly for the British Isles. 

2. Own Situation ; 

2 more submarines are en route to the zone of operations. 
For operations of the Norwegian submarines see Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

In the North Atlantic, Group "Vorwaerts" made contact with a westbound 
convoy of 11 to 15 steamers in quadrant AL 7463. 

Submarine "755" of Group "Loss" sank a U.S. auxiliary cruiser of 3,000 
GRT in quadrant AJ 9727; the ship was armed with four 10.5 cm guns. 

Upon her return to base, submarine U "510" reports a suspected sub- 
chaser force in quadrant BE 7923. 

-fol- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

Submarine U "66", returning from the western North Atlantic, sank the 
Swedish steamer PEIPING (6,390 GRT ) in quadrant DQ 18. 

No reports about achievements in other zones of operation have been re- 
ceived. 

Additional reports in supplement to submarine situation, War Diary, 
Part B, Vol. IV. 

Special Items : 

a. The Commanding Admiral, Submarines points to 5 instances which 
have occurred since 16 Jun., in which enemy planes succeeded in forcing 
us to abandon favorably progressing submarine operations within the 
range of our He 177 planes; he also points out the possibilities which 
would have offered themselves if German planes of this type could have 
intervened. The Commanding Admiral, Submarines is convinced of the ab- 
solute necessity of making available He 177' s, the only plane type 
suitable for this purpose, as quickly as possible and not after a delay 
of months, so that the planes may cooperate in combatting enemy con- 
voys. The Commanding Admiral, Submarines therefore asks the Naval Staff 
and the Air Commander, Atlantic Coast to request the assignment of the 
first available squadron of He 177 planes to the Air Command, Atlantic 
Coast for the above purpose, and calls attention to the old promise that 
the first He 177' s would be placed at his disposal for the support of 
submarine v/arfare. 

For copy of telegram see l/Skl 22271/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. IV. 

The above request meets with the full approval of the 
Naval Staff. If the appearance on the scene of He 177 
planes will force the enemy to shift his convoy routes 
further west beyond their range, this would at least re- 
lieve our submarines to a large extent from interference 
by enemy planes which must take off from a Briti sh home 
base or from Gibraltar. The proposal of the Commanding 
Admiral, Submarines will be followed up. 

b. The Naval Staff instructs the Commanding Admiral, Submarines 

to submit an analysis of the situation and plans for the use of SKA mines 
On this occasion the Naval Staff emphasizes the necessity of notifying 
the Naval Staff in time whenever submarine operations are planned as a 
consequence of information received. The Naval Staff must know the 
opinion of the Commanding Admiral, Submarines concerning planned opera- 
tions, as for instance the shift of emphasis to the fighting of convoys 
and the motivation for his steps prior to their execution . This applies 
also to special measures which may have special consequences (e.g., of a 
political nature). 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Incursions : 

In- the evening of 9 Sep., 10 enemy planes concentrated 



-09- 



B-1052 



confide:itial 



9 Sep. 1942 



Osnabrueck. Regarding the attack on a German convoy off the Channel 
Islands see Situation West Area. 

During the night of 9 Sep. there were 110 enemy incursions into German 
territory, about 70 of them from the east. In the east they penetrated 
as far as Memel, Ruegen, Gablenz, Prague, Lemberg, Hungary; in the west, 
Heligoland, eastern Friesland, Skagen, Denmark. They did not concentrate 
on a particular target. Only a few bombs were dropped. 2 or 3 planes 
reached Berlin from the east. No enemy planes were shot down. 



3. 



Mediterranean Theater: 



199 planes were observed on the Valletta airfield, 
nothing to report. 



Otherwise 



4. 



Eastern Front: 



111 enemy planes were shot down on the Eastern Front. Recon- 
naissance missions were flown over the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea, and 
the Arctic Ocean. 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean : 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, preparations 
for the embarkation of troops are being made at Gibraltar. Details were 
not yet reported. 

Air reconnaissance observed 3 submarines, 3 mine sweepers and 3 patrol 
vessels at Valletta, in addition to the merchant vessels and tankers 
previously reported. 3 medium large steamers escorted by 4 patrol 
vessels were sighted in the eastern Mediterranean during the forenoon 
50 miles north-northeast of Port Said on an easterly course, and at noon 
2 destroyers on an unidentified course 50 miles west of Haifa. 

According to a Portuguese report, a convoy of 19 British and U.S. 
steamers with food, ammunition and troops for Malta arrived at Port 
Said on 3 Sep. It is asserted that the convoy will receive an escort 
of 15 warships at Alexandria. The sailing date was not disclosed. 

This report may well be correct. It would confirm and 
supplement a report of the Attache at Rome, according to 
which it will be attempted to force a supply convoy 
through to Malta under all circumstances. (See War 
Diary of 7 Sep. ) 

According to another intelligence report, it has been established that 
a number of old torpedo boats converted into anti-aircraft vessels were 
at Haifa in the middle of August; these ships carry up to 10 anti- 
aircraft guns and machine gun3 each, in place of their dismantled tor- 
pedo tubes. 

2, Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

On 7 Sep., 2 British aerial mines were swept near Marsa 
Matruh by means of towed coil gear. An enemy air raid on Marsa Matruh 



•■130- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

during the night of 7 Sep. caused no damage in the harbor. 

The damaged Italian destroyer FUCILIERE anchored at the Cape Krio (Crete) 
roadstead. 6 German PT boats arrived at Augusta. 

The Commanding Admiral, German Naval Command, Italy reports that during 
his absence operations in North Africa will temporarily be controlled 
from there. The permanent solution would require assigning 2 staff 
officers to the Naval Commands, North Africa at Tobruk and Marsa Matruh. 
(See Telegram 1145.) 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa 

German anti-aircraft artillery on board the motor ship 
SESTHIERE reported shooting down an enemy plane on 8 Sep. During the 
night of 8 Sep. the convoy to Tobruk and Benghazi consisting of steamers 
ISEO and KALLIOPI was unsuccessfully attacked by bombers north of Derna . 
Otherwise supply shipments proceeded according to plan and without in- 
terference. 

The 3 minesweepers which arrived at North African per ts on 8 Sep. 

carried 281 men, 307 vehicles, 11 guns, 15 anti-tank guns, 7 tanks and 

4,144 tons of Armed Forces supplies, including 1,500 tons of fuel for 
German units. 

4. Area Naval Groun South: 

Aegean Sea ; 

Group South believes that the enemy submarine reported on C 
Sep. destroyed by an Italian torpedo boat is nothing but a submerged 
wreck of a ship with an oil cargo located by search gear and attacked by 
depth bombs. 

Convoy traffic according to plan. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

It was observed from land that strong Russian forces were 
disembarked in the harbor of Novorossisk on 8 Sep. 

The capture of Novorossisk, reported on 6 Sep., ap- 
parently did not yet include all of that city. 

According to air reconnaissance of the forenoon of 9 Sep., the number 
of coastal craft in the harbor of Gelendzhik has increased. A large 
number of light ships (PT boats and motor mine sweepers) were observed 
in the waters off Novorossisk. 

The Naval Staff Intelligence Division issued a report on data in connec- 
tion with the situation in the U.S.S.R. It contains information about 
the Russian submarines and mine sweepers in the Caspian Sea and about 
transport facilities on the Caspian Sea routes Baku-Gurev, Baku- 
Krasnovodsk and from Persian ports to Krasnovodsk. For copy see l/Skl 
30718 geh. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XI Va. 

Own Situation : 

On the evening of 7 Sep. the 2 Rumanian destroyers escorting 
the tank convoy wore unsuccessfully attacked by an enemy submar in e 2 - 



Qi- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

miles west of the Bosporus approach buoy. Lively traffic of small 
craft and patrol vessels, evidently including some torpedo boats, was 
observed in the Bosporus. 

An exploratory sweep and submarine chase carried out by 3 motor mine 
sweepers off the Crimean south coast on 8 Sep. had no results. On 9 
Sep. a sweep by 4 motor mine sweeoers is scheduled from Yalta through 
the southern portion of the Kerch Strait to Anapa in order to establish 
a mine-free route. 

A Croatian motor minesweeper group searched for mines off Yeisk. Mine- 
sweeping aircraft swept 2 mines off Yeisk on 7 Sep. 

2 Italian subchasers were sunk and 2 others damaged during an enemy air 
raid on Yalta. The Italian subchaser flotilla is to be transferred to 
Feodosiya. A Croatian patrolling pilot vessel sank on 6 Sep. after 
striking the German minefield off Genicheek. 

3 German PT boats sailed from Ivanbaba to Constanta on 8 Sep. for motor 
replacement. 



Transport and convoy traffic proceeded on the whole according to plan. 

Up to and including 8 SeD. the Kerch Strait had been crossed by 8,400 
men, 3,470 horses, and 936 vehicles. The ferrying of the 3rd Rumanian 
Mountain Division will probably be completed by the afternoon of 10 
Sep. Operations Staff Scheurlen was dissolved and has left. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



IX. Armv Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Armv Group A : 

Stubborn fighting for the dominating positions in the Novo- 
rossisk area continues. South of Krasnodar the enemy retreated in 
southerly direction. The enemy is successfully defending the approaches 
to Tuapse, Klydzh and Mai sky. Enemy pressure continues also south of 
Mozdok. 

Armv Group B : 

The battle for the strongly fortified defense positions of 
Stalingrad ie still raging. Heavy enemy pressure on the northern front 
of the XIV Panzer Corps continues. 

Central Army Group ; 

Strong Russian tank and infantry forces renewed their attacks 
in the Rzhev area following a heavy artillery barrage. Enemy units ad- 
vancing on both banks of the Volga from the direction of Zubtsov cap- 
tured a few villages. With this exception, all enemy attacks failed. 

-^112- B-1052 






CONFIDENTIAL 
9 Sep. 1942 

Northern Army Group ; 

Enemy forces which penetrated into our lines on 8 Sep. south | 
of Lake Ladoga were destroyed. An attempt by strong forces to cross the 
Neva River south of Schluesselburg did not succeed. 

2. Finnish Front : 
Nothing to report. 

3. North Africa : 

No situation report of the Panzer Army was received. 

■»H!-<hs--:hk:~:k:-^-{K5"!:"?s-:h{-:h:-!k:-::-!M!->-> 



» 



» 



-ll$- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



10 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain : 

The Chancellor of the Exchequer reported to the House of Commons that 
the cost to Great Britain of the first 3 years of war amounted to 10 
billion pounds; taking into account the normal peace-time debt this 
figure rises to 12. 1 billion. 40/b of this tremendous figure has been 
raised by taxes. 

During the debate about Churchill's address, members of the Labour 
Party called for more assistance to Russia. Mr. Bevin came out for 
the immediate establishment of the second front and commented that the 
British nation has more confidence in Voroshilov's and Timoshenko's 
judgment than in Churchill's. Another representative of the Labour 
Party sharply rebuked this statement. 

The London Press agrees with Churchill's opinion that the war situa- 
tion is slowly improving in favor of the Allies. The Times in par- 
ticular remarked that the House of Commons has clearly shown that the 
present moment is not the time to criticize the basic principles of 
the conduct of the war. 

France ; 

According to Reuter, Washington has rejected the French protest agains|t 
the bombing of French cities with the statement that such war measures 
have to be taken. The U.S. Charge d'Affaires announced that retalia- 
tory steps against American residents In France would result in an im- 
mediate break of relations. 

U.S.A. ; 

Secretary of State Hull announced that the U.S. has established mili- 
tary bases on the Galapagos Islands with the permission of t he 
Ecuadorian Government. 

Japan ; 

The Chief of the Press Department at Headquarters, Colonel Yakagi, de- 
clared that the war in the Pacific will last very long, since it has 
grown beyond its original object which was the application of the New 
Order to China. Japan is fully determined to continue even if the war 
lasts 100 years. 



Special Items ; 

I. The Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North as 
naval barges to serve as guncarriers in order t 
ships operating in Dutch coastal waters again.st 
The Chief of Staff, Naval Staff decided that 10 
should be converted at once into guncarriers an 
the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North. The r 
the number of naval barges available for supply 
must be accepted. The Naval Staff Quart ermaste 
had voiced concern over this proposal and sugge 
of the guncarriers under construction for the C 
fenses, West to the Commanding Admiral, Defense 



ked for at least 10 
o reinforce the light 

enemy motor gunboats. 

additional naval barges 
d put at the disposal of 
esulting reduction of 

transports in Germany 
r Division, Fleet Branch 
sted allocating 3 or 4 
ommanding Admiral, De- 
s, North. 



-114- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



10 Sep. 1942 



II. According to an intelligence report, a naval unit which cooperates 
with the Free French Navy, has been recruited from natives of the 
Syrian and Lebanese Republics. It comprises approximately 2,000 men who| 
received uniforms at Beirut and were shipped to Alexandria to join 
French training detachments. 



III. Survey of convoys and transports during August 1942 in the area of 
Group North . 



(a) Escorted war- 
ships: 

(b) Escorted mer- 
chant vessels 



Norway 



138 



Commanding Commanding 

Admiral Admiral 

Defenses Defenses 

North Baltic Sea 



Naval Commander, 

Station I.Iine- 

Baltic Sweepers 

Baltic Sea 



59 



48 



132 



23 





Number: 


605 


453 




GUT: 1,463 


,372 


1,004,853 


(c) 


Aerial attacks : 
Submarine at- 


6 


14 




tacks : 


3 


- 




PT boat at- 








tacks : 


- 


1 


(d) 


Total losses by 








Mines: 


• — 


5 




Bombs : 


- 


- 




Submarine tor- 








pedoes: 


2 


- 




PT boat tor- 








pedoes: 


- 


- 



(e) Mines swept: 8 
Planes shot down: 
Submarines sunk: 

PT boats, etc. sunk: - 

(f ) Number of trans- 
ported 

men: 10,254 

Horses: 549 

Vehicles: 1,251 
Armed Forces 249,010 
supplies (tons) 



72 283 347 
369,671 1,141,718 1,054,669 



140 
2 



13 



16,676 
2,398 
1,885 

23,612 



8 
3 



59 

1 



63 
275,465 



36 

1 

1 

3 

2 



25 
2 
3 
3 



63,352 56,427 



' 229 



1,044 
459,632 



For detailed report of Group North see l/Skl 22118/42 Gkdos. in War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. V. 

IV. Enemy reports compiled from decoded radio messages and by radio 
monitoring for the period of 3 Aug. to 6 Sep. are contained in Radio In- 
telligence Report No. 36/42 of the Chief of Naval Communications Divi- 
sion, Radio Intelligence Branch. 



-115- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
10 Sep. 1942 

Situation 10 Sep. 1942 

I. War In Foreign Waters 

1. E nemy Situation : 

South Atlantic : 

It is learned fron a Japanese source that a convoy of 47 
steamers with airplane equipment and 10,000 men sailed from New York 
on 30 Aug. for Para (Brazil). 

According to an Italian report, the REVENGE was in the waters off 
Durban at the end of August. 

It is reported from Lourenco Marques that a large convoy sailed from 
Capetown on 31 Aug. for New York via La Plata. The route is said to 
have been far to the south. 

Indian Ocean ; 

The German Embassy at Paris was informed by Darlan's office 
that strong Anglo-American forces have been landing since 0400 of 10 
Sep. on the west coast of Madagascar; the operation is centered at 
Majunga, where 18 enemy ships have been counted. There i s strong air 
activity. An attack on Ambanja has been in progress since 0700. An 
enemy warship disembarked troops at Morondava. Shortly before 0700 
the Governor reported that the French had offered resistance, but since 
0700 all communication with Madagascar is interrupted. According to 
French opinion, the chances of successful resistance are slight. 

Pacific Ocean ; 

According to a Japanese report, 1 U.S. battleship and 6 
cruisers arrived in the Canal Zone for transfer to the Pacific. 

The Japanese Military Attache reports from Kuibyshev that 30 Russian 
steamers proceeded west over the northern route between 29 Jun. and 16 
Jul.; 9 more left on 10 Aug. with the icebreaker MIK0YAN and another 
4 on 24 Aug. 

This v/ould permit a considerable supply flow to Russia 
and proves the necessity of our conducting operations 
like "Wunderland" as soon as the season permits. 

2. Own Situation ; 

The Naval Staff informs ship "10" by Radiogram 2207 that the 
DRESDEN sailed from Saigon on 8 Sep., will pass point "Saale" around 15 
Sep. and has received the same sailing instructions as the KULKERLAND . 

The Attache at Tokyo reports the sailing of REGENSBURG on 9 Sep. from 
Yokohama via Kobe and Batavia, and that she will leave Singapore 
probably on 8 Oct. The ship is equipped to accommodate 150 prisoners 
of v/ar. (See Telegram 1900.) 

The Naval Staff agrees to let the Japanese have the requested torpedoes 
and mines and has no objections to instructing them in their use. The 
Attache at Tokyo is advised to this effect. 

Enemy situation report by Radiogram 1937. 



06- 



B-1052 



. CONFIDENTIAL 
10 Sep. 1942 

II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance revealed lively traffic of steamers and 
small warships in the Channel area. 

According to radio monitoring the escort vessels ALBRIGHTON and 
GLAISDALE which took part in the Dieppe raid left Portsmouth in the 
evening. 

A' British plane reported at 2138 of 9 Sep. an attack on a NARVIK-clasa 
ship 11 miles west of Cape Vilano. The message was rebroadcast to all 
ships in home waters. 

At 1020 an escort ship of an SL convoy reported the presence of a 
shadowing plane from quadrant BE 5256; the ship was on a course of 9° 
and was proceeding at 7 knots. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Atlantic Coast : 

Reconnaissance in a westerly direction was carried out in 
the evening; the enemy was not sighted. Group V/est informs the WESER- 
LAND of this fact and also transmits the weather forecast for the area 
around 43° N 15° W, according to which mostly cloudy skies and possible 
fog are to be expected. The other 2 blockade runners can figure on 
about 10 miles visibility in the southern portion of the Bay of Bis- 
cay. At 2015 the WESERLAND reported from 15° 30' W that she was being 
pursued by a hydroplane around 2000. The grouping of the signal was 
interpreted as on previous occasions to indicate that the ship was so 
far undamaged. 

Group West acknowledged receipt of the message and transmitted a re- 
port sent by a British plane to Gibraltar concerning a merchant 
vessel of less than 10,000 GRT observed at 42° 05' N on a 235° course 
proceeding at 10 knots. See Radiogram 1815. 

Supply ship BRAKE sailed according to plan. For barrage report con- 
cerning the entrance to Brest naval base see Telegram 2225» 

Channel Coast : 

The mine-laying mission of the 5th PT Boat Flotilla and min- 
ing operation "Finale" were executed according to plan during the 
night of 9 Sep. 

Torpedo operations of the 2nd, 4th and 6th PT Boat Flotillas are 
scheduled for the night of 10 Sep. 

The motor tanker HEXE hit an underwater obstruction off Nieuport and 
sank. During an attack on the Channel Island convoy on 9 Sep., one of 
the attackers was shot down for sure and a second one probably, by 
patrol vessels. 

A belated report about the convoy action off Etaples during the night 
of 7 Sep. tells of the probable destruction of an enemy PT boat and of 
damage to several others. The enemy attacked 8 times and our ships 
successfully dodged 5 torpedoes. 



-E3?- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



10 Sep. 1942 



y.i.ne -laying operations "Nacht M and "Falter" (cutter float barrage and 
minefield in the northern portion of the Seine Bay) are scheduled for 
the night of 10 Sep. 

The office of the Admiral, Amphibious Forces is established at Antwerp 
as of 10 Sep. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation ; 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

Enemy planes flew over the coastal area of the German Bight 
during the night of 9 Sep. and mine-laying is suspected north of the 
'.'.'est Frisian Islands. Enemy planes flew over Schleswig-Holstein and 
Jutland into the Baltic Sea entrances and the Baltic Sea. Night , 
fighters shot down 1 plane northwest of Nissum Fjord. A convoy off 
Schiermonnikocg was bombed without result. The 15th Mine Sweeper 
Flotilla swept 3 mines. Convoy service on schedule. 



2. Norway ; 

On 9 Sep. Liinahamari harbor was shelled by a Russian 
battery on Hybachi Peninsula but no damage was caused. Army Coastal 
Battery 1/773 returned the fire. A Norwegian trawler was unsuccess- 
fully bombed and strafed by a Russian plane off Kavningsberg on 7 Sep. 
There was enemy air activity over the Arctic Coast on 8 Sep. and over 
the Stavanger area on the west coast on 9 Sep. 

The request of the Commanding Admiral, Norway for allocation of a 
mine-exploding vessel (see War Diary of 9 Sep.) is rejected by Group 
North which decides that the protection of the fleet anchorages and 
approaches against ground mines must be effected by means of towed re- 
mote clearance gear. For details see Telegram 1617. 

Group North agrees to the suggested laying of a new minefield in 
L'alanger Fjord (see V.'ar Diary of 7 Sep.). It remains to be decided 
whether the minefield should be laid right away or is to be delayed 
until the arrival of deep water cutter floats. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

5 to 7 British ships were located on 9 Sep. by radio monitor- 
ing in the southern exit of Gorlo Strait and in the Archangel area. 2 
Russian submarines and probably 3 other submarines were at sea. 

At 1510 a British ship reported sighting 1 battleship, 1 cruiser, and 
6 destroyers in quadrant A3 9884. The reporting ship was definitely 
established as a submarine. It is interesting that the message was 
coded in a key which had thus far not been used by submarines. The 
force was first reported on a 100° course and thereafter on a 270° 
course. 



08- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
10 Sep. 1942 

Radio monitoring also intercepted a report of the 95th Air Regiment of 
9 Sep. at 2323, according to which the operations group had executed 
on 8 Sep. 11 missions to locate convoys and to establish the presence 
of submarines. A total of 6 vessels was mentioned in the report. 
Positions could not be decoded. 

Today's air reconnaissance was unable to locate convoys PQ 18 and QP 
14. 

Surveying the enemy plane situation of 9 Sep., the Admiral, Arctic 
Ocean states that, as shown by aerial photos, the number of planes on 
airfields in the Murmansk area as far as Niva has increased perceptibly. 
Likewise, a considerable increase in the number of fighter planes has 
been noted in spite of the fact that the figure of planes shot down is 
consistently high. According to prisoner statements, 2 squadrons were 1 
transferred to the Murmansk area early in September after having been 
trained mostly for the use of torpedoes. This measure indicates the 
intention of protecting convoy shipping to a large extent by air 
forces. Reconnoitering of the Iceland coastal areas has become dif- 
ficult due to increased anti-aircraft defenses. The improvement of 
airfields in the area Iokanga -Western Channel-Cape Kanin and the in- 
crease of planes based on them point to the fact that the convoy route 
to Archangel along the west coast of Novaya Zemlya is being protected 
by air forces. Ship traffic observed between the western channel and 
Byelushya Bay leads to the assumption that another air base is under 
construction at Byelushya. 

Own Situation ; 

The task force of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers was 
spotted by the enemy while emerging from the Grimsoestraumen and the 
Gavle Fjord, as established by the radio intercept service (see Enemy 
Situation). The British submarine fired a four-fan at the task force 
in quadrant AB 985848; all 4 torpedoes v/ere end-of-run detonators. No 
further incident of importance occurred during the remainder of the 
task force's transfer to Kaa Fjord. 

The Naval Staff submits the following analysis of the information ob- 
tained from air reconnaissance concerning convoy PQ, 18 to the 
Fuehrer Headquarters, the Armed Forces High Command and the Operations 
Staff, Air Force. 

Convoy PQ 18 assembled on 8 and 9 Sep. north of Iceland; it consists 
of 35 vessels and is protected by 1 or 2 battleships, 3 or 4 cruisers, 
approximately 15 destroyers and possibly also by 1 auxiliary aircraft 
carrier. So far, nothing is known about the whereabouts of the heavy 
covering force which must be counted on to consist of 1 or 2 aircraft 
carriers and 1 or more battleships. It could not yet be established 
whether convoy QP 14 got under way. For copy of telegram see l/Skl I 
op 22336/42 Gkdos. in file "Operations 'Eispalast' and 'Meisenbalz '. " 

The same commands were also informed about the measures taken against 
convoys PQ 18 and QP 14 as reported by Group North, namely: 

(1) Transfer of HIPPER with Commanding Admiral, Cruisers on boarid, 
SCHEER, KOELN and 5 destroyers from Bogen Bay to Kaa Fjord, where they 
are scheduled to arrive on 11 Sep. at 0500. 

(2) Transfer of torpedo boats T "9" and "12" from Trondheim to 
Narvik where they will be at the disposal of the TIRPITZ. The de- 
stroyers ECKOLDT and STEINBRINCK will probably arrive at Narvik onll 
Sep«— from Kirkenes «nd they, too, will be at the disposal" of ~ the TIRPITZ. 



-B- 



B-1052 



: ::t:l.l::i:.-.i 

10 Sep. 1942 

(3) Submarines U "88", "403", and U "405" are en route from 
the Spitsbergen and Bear Island area to a patrol line extending 
through quadrants A3 1790, 4210, and 4250. En route the zone of op- 
erations are the submarines U "589", U "377", "408", and U "592". 
The submarines U "435" and U "457" will probably be ready for opera- 
tions by 12 Sep. at Narvik, and U "378" at Trondheim. Submarine 

U "703" is at Harstadt on a brief stay for refueling. The total num- 
ber of submarines is 11. 

(4) 4 submarines will operate against convoy QP 14: U "255" In 
quadrant AC 96 following refueling, U "601" in quadrant AT 17 
probably after 15 Sep., U "456" at the V.hite Sea entrance; T J "251", 
following refueling at Kirkenes, will be disposed as required by the 
situation at that time. 

The fact that the task force of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers was 
spotted that early by a British submarine and unsuccessfully attacked 
by the latter proves once more that the Arctic area is greatly im- 
periled by submarines, particularly when enemy convoys are under way. 
Group North therefore orders the intensification of uninterrupted 
surveillance of the entrances and exits of the inter-island channels 
and of the entire route outside the islands when warships are being 
transferred. For copy see l/Skl 22380/42 Gkdos. in operations file. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, 3".ltlc Sea 

1. Enemy Situation : 

3 British courier planes flew over the Skagerrak on their 
way from Sweden to England during the night of 9 Sep. 

2. Own Situation : 

During the night of 9 Sep. enemy planes operated in Danish 
waters and in the eastern and central Baltic Sea. !.'ines are suspected 
to have been laid in the Kattegat. For details see Telegram 0724. 
Since it is very likely that mines were laid for the first time also 
in the eastern portion of the Kattegat in the vicinity of Cape Kullen, 
it will be necessary to reroute merchant vessels. The Commanding Ad- 
miral, Defenses, Baltic Sea asks that the number of minesweepers be 
increased. (See Telegram 1200.) Otherwise, there is nothing to re- 
port from the area of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea. 

One ground mine was swept off Sassnitz and one off Trelleborg. 

Nothing to report from the area of the Commander, Minesweepers, Baltic 
Sea. 

Kinesweeplng operations of the pinnaces were affected by bad weather. 



V. Submarine '.Varfare 

l a Enemy Situation : 

An enemy plane reported from the northern rendezvous area to 



-E>- 



=-:::2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
10 Sep. 1942 

have scored 4 hits on a submarine in the area west of Reyk janes. 18 
planes were observed in the southern rendezvous area. About the loca- 
tion of a northbound convoy in quadrant BE 5256 see Enemy Situation, 
West Area. 

4 reports about sighted submarines were intercepted from the American 
east coast and in the West Indies. 

2. Own Situation ; 

4 more submarines have sailed for the zone of operations, 3 
of them from home bases. 

Regarding operations of the Norwegian submarine group against convoys 
PQ, 18 and QP 14 see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

Group "Vorwaerts" is operating in quadrant AK 9699 against a westbound 
convoy in the North Atlantic. The air escort which, according to one 
of the submarines, is protecting the convoy could apparently not be- 
come very effective due to weather conditions. Thus, the submarines 
have good opportunities as reflected by the successes achieved: 

Submarine U "657" sank an 8,000 GRT tanker 

Submarine U "584" sank a straggler tanker of 9,000 GRT 

Submarine U "218" sank a 5,000 GRT steamer and probably a 3,000 

GRT steamer 

Submarine U "96" torpedoed 3 steamers totalling 16,000 GRT, which 

probably sank. 

In addition, a steamer of undetermined size was torpedoed by submarine 
U "659" and a 5,000 GRT steamer by submarine U "608". One submarine had 
to withdraw on account of damage through depth charges, another one 
moved away temporarily for the same reason. The operation continues. 

Off the American east coast a 7,000 GRT transport was sunk in quadrant 
BB 6333 out of a small convoy by submarine U "513". 

Submarine U "69" completed the mine-laying mission in Chesapeake Bay. 

No reports of any successes were received from the West Indies, the 
South Atlantic, or the Mediterranean. 

Further reports in supplement to submarine situation, War Diary, Part 
B, Vol. IV. 

Giving his reasons, the Commanding Admiral, Submarines submits a re- 
quest to reserve the area beyond a 600 mile radius from Capetown for 
submarine operations and to shift the boundaries fixed for the return 
voyage of the submarines to the southwest by approximately 500 miles 
in the southern portion and approximately 200 miles in the northern 
portion. 

In reply, the Naval Staff decided to fix the operations area for the 
return voyage of Group "Eisbaer" as follows: Southern boundary is 
the latitude of 40° S, the western limit runs from the lower left corner 
of quadrant GZ 16 to the lower left corner of quadrant FE 91. The 
permission to attack targets within a radius of 300 miles from St. 
Helena and Ascension Island is withdrawn herewith. The establishment 



-L2l- B - 1052 



10 Sep. 1942 

of latitude 40° S as southern boundary was necessary In viaw of the 
blockade runner traffic to and from Japan. 

For copy of telegrams, containing reasons for request and the decision 
see l/Skl Iu 1779/42 Gkdos . Chefs, in Yfar Diary, Part C, Vol. IV. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Incursions ; 

There were 200 enemy Incursions Into western German territory 
during the night of 10 Sep. Their attacks centered on Duesseldorf 
where heavy damage was wrought. For details see daily situation re- 
port. 15 planes were shot down by our fighters, 15 by anti-aircraft 
artillery and 1 by naval anti-aircraft artillery. 

■ 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

Our Air Force supported the operations of the Africa Corps. 
Enemy air activity was light. Otherwise nothing to report. 

4. Eastern Front ; 

54 enemy planes were reported shot down thus far. 

On 9 Sep. an He 111 plane landed on Spitsbergen- in search of a suitable 
emergency landing place. For results of reconnaissance In the Arctic 
Ocean see Situation, Arctic Ocean. 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, 3 cruisers 
and 7 or steamers, all of undetermined nationality, were observed 
off Cape de Gata about 5 miles from the coast sailing on an easterly 
course on the forenoon of 9 Sep. 

Cape de Gata reported that engine noises could be heard throughout the 
night of Sep. and that 10 planes on an easterly course were observed 
in the morning of 9 Sep.; a few hours later 3 planes passed in a 
westerly direction. Air reconnaissance reported nothing about the 
above mentioned naval force. 

ITothing else to report from the entire Mediterranean area. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

Enemy planes attacked Tobruk during the night of 8 Sep., in 



-w*- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



10 Sep. 1942 



the evening and during the night of 9 Sep. Except for a sailing 
vessel, no damage was caused in the harbor. 

1 FT boat transferred from Naples to Augusta. As of 7 Sep., the 
German Naval Command, Italy is directing operations from Rome. The 
Naval Staff submitted copies of the survey compiled by the German Na- 
val Command, Italy about the British August convoy from Gibraltar to . 
Malta to the Naval Representative of the Armed Forces High Command, 
Operations Staff, to the Naval Liaison Officer on the Army High 
Command General Staff, to the Naval Representative on the Air Force 
Operations Staff and to Naval Group, South; the Naval Staff pointed to 
its own comment on this subject of 17 Aug. (see War Diary of 17 Aug.) 
and the differences of opinion concerning the probable destination of 
the convoy. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Transport of supplies from Italy and Greece to North Africa 
and coastal supply traffic proceeded according to plan without major 
incident. 

Due to interruption in communications no situation reports were re- 
ceived from Naval Group South. Information by telephone revealed 
nothing of importance. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 



Nothing to report. 



IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A ; 

The situation did not change essentially. 

Army Group B : 

Stubborn fighting for the possession of Stalingrad continues 
Enemy attacks on the northern sector of the XIV Panzer Corps launched 
by a full division were successfully repulsed save for a temporary 
local penetration. A see-saw battle is in progress at the front of 
the Rumanian divisions east of Svoboda. The over-all situation is un- 
changed. 

Central Army Group : 

Enemy attempts to seize the highway between Demenskoye and 
Yuklinov were unsuccessful. West of Zubtsov our advancing troops 
clashed with attacking enemy forces. The battle is still in progress. 
Otherwise the situation in the Rzhev area remained essentially un- 
changed. 



-B- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



10 Sep. 1942 



Northern Army Group ; 

In the afternoon, units of the 11th Army launched an attack 
to mop up the enemy penetration south of Lake Ladoga. Enemy attempts 
to cross the Neva River east of Leningrad failed. 

2. Finnish Front : 

An enemy thrust in the Kandalaksha sector was repulsed. It 
is reported that a fresh Ural division has arrived in the rear of the 
Lltsa sector and a reindeer-ski brigade for the protection of the 
southern flank. The enemy damaged the power line of the Kolosjoki 
nickel mine with explosives. The operation of this most important 
plant is not seriously affected. 

3. North Africa ; 

Enemy scouting activity was light, harassing fire continued 
in varying force. During the period from 30 Aug. to 9 Sep. a total of 
170 enemy tanks and scout cars was destroyed. 

HBBB B BBBBBBBBBBBBB S BBBBBB " 



S- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

With regard to the British attack on Madagascar , the British Govern- 
ment Issued an official communique saying that the attitude of the 
French Government has made it clear that compliance with essential 
demands of the British High Command made on the Governor of Madagascar 
regarding protection against attacks by the Axis Powers can no longer 
be expected by peaceful means. The British Government has no terri- 
torial claims in Madagascar, which remains French. 

The U.S. State Department declares that the British step is being 
taken with the complete approval of the U.S. Government. The British 
and the U.S. Governments agree to return Madagascar to France after 
the war or at any moment that the necessity of Allied occupation 
ceases to exist. 

The French Government published a communique about the invasion but 
limits itself to a mild condemnation of this uncalled-for attack. 

As further reported from London, it is pointed out that ever since 
Diego Suarez was occupied, Japanese planes have been permitted to fly 
over the French part of the island at will; at the same time Japanese 
submarines have been taking on supplies and Japanese naval officers 
allowed to go ashore. Besides, German agents have received assistance. 

Great Britain : 

Referring once more to India, Churchill stated that the situation has 
improved and generally calmed down. Cripps' proposals which have the 
approval of the Government represent its official viewpoint. Churchill 
also stated that 140,000 Hindus enlisted during the last 2 months, 
leading him to conclude that the Congress Party, which represents 
only 1/8 of India's population, is unable to divert India's army from 
its duty. 

During the ensuing debate, Churchill's statements were strongly at- 
tacked by the Left. 

The complete address is contained in the supplement to the Foreign 
Press Review of the Armed Forces High Command of 11 Sep. 

With regard to the responsibilities of the First Lord of the Admiralty, 
the War Minister and the Air Minister in case of combined operations 
of the 3 branches of the Armed Forces, Churchill declared that the 
main responsibility rests with the War Cabinet and the Defense Minister, 
while the individual ministers are responsible for the details within 
the competence of their respective offices. 

In a debate about the question of pay, the present pay rate of the 
Armed Forces was severely criticized in comparison with the much 
higher pay of the U.S. forces in Great Britain. 

Turkey : 

The German Embassy reports that Willkie arrived at Ankara on 8 Sep. and 
intends -to proceed to Teheran on 10 Sep. He will not see the President 
since he does not carry any special message from Roosevelt. 

Argentina : 

The arrest of 1st Lieutenant Drews of GRAF SPEE was due to his refusal 



BB-1052 
- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

to appear before the committee investigating anti -Argentine activities, 
His release is expected shortly, as a consequence of a German official 
protest . 



Conference on the Situation with the Chief, Naval Staff 

I. The Chief, Naval Staff has returned from his inspection trip to 
the Crimea. The Commanding Admiral, Black Sea urgently needs a vaca- 
tion for reasons of health. The Commander in Chief, Navy agreed to 
having Rear Admiral Heye substitute for him as suggested by the Com- 
manding .idmiral, Group South. 

II. The Chief, Naval Staff Communications Division reports as follows: 

a. The German-Japanese naval communicstions agreement was 
signed today and went into effect. This represents a major step 
toward cooperation between Germany and Japan. For copy see l/Skl 
22952/42 Gkdos . in War Diary, Part B, Vol. V. 

b. American planes, engaged in special missions under fighter 
escort, have recently been interfering with the Air Force's anti- 
aircraft warning service in the west area. Count ermeasures are ab- 
solutely required in order to avert trouble. 

c. The newly developed radar set for flying boats ( "Hohentwiel" ) 
has a range of 15 km at an altitude of 50 m and a range of 400 km at ' 
an altitude of 1000 m. It thus approximates the performance of the 
British equipment. 

d. The Chief, Naval Staff calls attention to the complaint of 
the Commanding Admiral, Group South about the inadequacy of technical 
communications within the Group's area and requests the Chief, Com- 
munications Division, Naval Staff to send an expert to this area to 
assist in improving the situation. 

III. As reported by the Chief, Naval Staff Quartermaster Division the 
Fuehrer commented on the Navy's tasks for the coming winter. Survival 
in this war depends on the undisturbed possession and exploitation of 
the Petsamo nickel mines. It is therefore clear that the seizure of 
northern Norway and the disruption of German communication lines to 
this area remain a prime objective of enemy strategy. For this reason, 
the principal task of the Navy, apart from submarine warfare, consists 
in bolstering the defense of northern Norway and all available forces 
must be concentrated there. The Fuehrer demands that the TIRPITZ, 

If at all possible, not be sent to Germany for shipyard overhaul. 
Neither does ho agree with the operations planned for the heavy naval 
forces . 

With regard to the above, the Chief, Quartermaster Division, Naval 
Staff remarks as follows : 

The reinforcement suggested may be achieved with gun barges, as 
planned for the Channel area. 

The transfer of SCHARNHORST and ITUERNBERG to northern Norway has al- 
ready been arranged for. The Diesel engines of the TIRPITZ could 
possibly be repaired at Trcndheim. The shipyard overhaul of the SCHEER 
can be postponed until summer, if necessary. Besides, a stay of not 
more than 4 weeks at a German shipyard could be justified. 



Qe- 



8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

The Chief, Naval Staff emphasizes the correctness of the Fuehrer's 
judgment and orders an immediate examination of the ship repair 
facilities in Norway. 

The Naval Construction Division reports that the SCHEER can be docked 
at Oslo. The Fleet Commander would prefer the transfer to a German 
shipyard. 

IV. The Chief, Quartermaster Division, Naval Staff reports further 
about the shipyard worker problem: 

The 300 militarized workers assigned to the Aegean Sea must be in- 
cluded in the 3,200 men to be supplied by the Naval Recruitment 
Division. Besides, the Minister of Armament and '.7ar Production re- 
ported to the Fuehrer that it was impossible to carry out his order 
to release the shipyard workers required. The Fuehrer, v/hile not 
repealing his directive, has ordered the Minister of Armament and 
War Production to take the matter up with the Commander in Chief, 
Navy once more. Thus . the matter stands where it was before. 

The Fuehrer also ordered that drastic measures be taken in connec- 
tion with the bomb plot at the Brest submarine pen. 

The Commander in Chief, Navy will advise the Commanding Admiral, 
France to this effect directly by telephone. 

The Fuehrer refuses to accept the reported schedule for the reinforce- 
ment of the heavy coastal batteries and orders that this job be 
speeded v/ithout reducing the thickness of the concrete construction. 
The only thing that can be omitted is the concrete roofing of the 
heavy batteries in circular mounts. 

V. The Chief, Quartermaster Division, Naval Staff reports his con- 
cern about the problem of training young officers for Fleet forces; 
so far, the entire crop of new officers has been assigned to sub- 
marines and the air forces. The Commander in Chief, Navy calls for 
a report on this subject by the Naval Officer Personnel Division and 
the Naval Recruitment Division. 

VI. The Chief, Naval Staff and the Naval Staff discussed the 
Fuehrer's demand for severest retaliation in reply to the reported 
British behavior on sinking the mine-laying vessel ULI.I; they agreed 
that this delicate problem requires the most thorough study lest 
such measures boomerang and hurt German crews. It would furthermore 
be the first instance within the annals of naval warfare that an ex- 
plicit order to use force against shipwrecked personnel would be 
given. 

As far as the ULM incident is concerned, the facts known at this 
moment by no means present a clear picture of the situation. The 
result of the investigation, which is still in progress, will be 
submitted to the Fuehrer. 

VII. As reported by the Naval Construction Division, the shipyard 
work on the LUETZOVJ will be completed by the end of October so that 
the ship will probably be ready for operations following the 
necessary tests, etc. on 16 Nov. 

Thus, the repair will take much longer than estimated and it appears 
uncertain whether the ship can be assigned, as planned, to the 
training course for gunnery officers; this matter has had to be 



-P-27- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



11 Sen. 1942 



postponed a number of tines in spite of its great urgency. Since the 
cause of the delay is attributed to the lack of skilled labor, the 
Chief, Quartermaster Division, Naval Staff suggests that this case also 
be submitted to the Minister of Armament and V.'ar Production as well as 
to the Fuehrer as an example of the difficulties resulting from the 
labor scarcity in all fields. 

In a Very Restricted Circle : 

VIII. The Chief, Operations Branch, Naval Staff Operations Division 
reports on the Armed Forces High Command directive of 5 Sep. concerning 
operation "Nordlicht"; see War Diary of 6 Sep., Special Items. 

A report is also made about the account of the German General attached 
to Italian High Command Headquarters; see V.'ar Diary of 9 Sep. 



Special Items ; 

The Naval Staff submits copies of its comment on the North African sit- 
uation (see War Diary of 8 Sep.) to the Permanent Representative of the 
Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters, to the Naval 
Representative on the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Commagnd and 
to the Naval Liaison Officer to the Army General Staff for their in- 
formation and states in this connection: 

The Suez area and Egypt represent the key to the British position in 
the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Naturally, the enemy too, has 
recognized that the establishment of an impregnable front in this area 
is the most important strategic problem at this moment. If the Army 
believes that an attack on the Suez area from the west is impossible, 
it should launch an offensive against the Suez area from the east and 
penetrate to Basra in order to prevent an enemy threat to our flank and 
at the same time eliminate the Iraq oil fields. 

However, the following should be taken Into account: Germany went to 
war in the Mediterranean in order to assist her Italian ally In order to 
protect the Mediterranean position and Italy. This vital task has lost 
none of its importance and the protection of the Mediterranean front 
demands that the North African front must be held. This in turn hinges 
on the flow of supplies, which can be maintained only if Malta is either 
completely paralyzed or seized. As we have learned from experience, it 
takes the continuous commitment of strong forces to tie up Malta with- 
out capturing it, besides causing constant high losses and wear and tear 
on equipment. The early seizure of Malta therefore remains a must and 
should not be delayed by waiting for favorable weather conditions in 
the suinmer .1943; this step should be taken soon. 

The situation therefore calls- for strong forces in the Mediterranean In 
any case; the elimination of Malta requires considerable reinforcement 
of our air forces and strengthening of the North African front. On the 
other hand, the success of a thrust against 'the Suez area from the east 
through the Caucasus and across Turkey is doubtful and requires strong 
forces, too. For all these reasons the Naval Staff maintains that it 
should be attempted with everything we have to take Suez from the west . 



For copy of telegram l/Skl I b (plan) 1775/42 Gkdos. Chefs. 
Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV. 



see War 



Qo- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

Situation 11 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign V/aters 

1. Enemy Si tua tl on : 

On 10 Sep. the German Ambassador at Buenos Aires reported 
that according to statements made to the Hungarian Charge d 'Affaires on 
9 Sep. at the Argentine Foreign Office, news was very recently received 
from Rio de Janeiro to the effect that a major operation against Dakar 
originating from Brazil is planned by the Allies in the near future. 
This is supposed to be the surprise announced in Churchill's address. 

Otherwise nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation ; 

As suggested by the Commander in Chief, Navy, on 3 Sep. the 
Fuehrer promoted the captain of ship "28", Commander (Naval Reserve) 
von Ruckdeschell to Captain (Naval Reserve) for extraordinary distinc- 
tion in action. 

The Naval Staff transmits this information to ship "28" with congratu- 
lations of the Commander in Chief, Navy. See Radiogram 2202. 

The sailing order issued on 6 Sep. to the TANNENFELS is cancelled and the 
ship instructed to proceed to the rendezvous point with ship "28", 1° 
north and 7° 30' west of point "Saege". The Naval Staff figures that 
she will arrive there on 18 Sep. at the earliest. Immediately follow- 
ing the rendezvous with ship "28" another rendezvous with ship "23" is 
to take place at a point 3° south of the rendezvous point with ship "28f. 
From there the TANNENFELS has orders to proceed to- Europe via point 
"Treibanker". (See Radiogram 0428.) 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo reports by Telegram 1818: 

(1) The Japanese Navy requests that prisoners not be disembarked 
at Batavia this time, but taken to Japan. 

(2) The Japanese Navy is now investigating whether it might be 
possible to sail through Macassar Strait to Medan and to pick up 30 
German sailors who are desired in Tokyo as a personnel reserve. Cable 
reply is requested whether the SCHLIEMANN is able to comply. 

(3) Due to the lack of tankers, the Japanese Navy is eager to 
utilize the empty tank space of the SCHLIEMANN to transport crude oil 
to Japan from the south area. This was approved; the freight rate is 
to be determined later. Cable reply is requested regarding the avail- 
able space. Loading port will be named at the proper time. 

The Naval Staff instructs ship "10" via Radiogram 2016 about the 
positions of enemy vossels, the names of which are being used by our 
vessels for camouflage purposes. All ships in foreign waters are in- 
formed by Radiogram 0711 about the cover names being used by the blockade 
runners TANNENFELS, KULMERLAND, and DRESDEN, sailing from Japan. 

Radiogram 2247 informs the UCKERMARK that the Naval Staff takes charge 
of her on 12 Sep. at 0600. 

Enemy situation report to all ships in foreign waters by Radiograms 0635 
and 1613. 



■Ji9- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 19 42 

II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

At 1645 radio monitoring intercepted a message from a British 
plane about sighting e. medium sized merchant vessel in quadrant BF 7931 
on a 300° course; after 1905 a British plane repeatedly reported about 
an attack on a merchant vessel sailing an easterly course 10 miles west 
of Cape Ortegal. 

An intelligence report from Spain contains statements of enemy diplo- 
mats at Barcelona, according to which U.S. parachute units arrived with 
2 convoys at southwestern Scotland a short time ago and are to be used 
for impending nuisance raids on the Channel coast. 

2, Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

For the information of WESEHLAND and SPICHERN, three FY/ 200 
planes conducted long-range reconnaissance in the area between 42° 30' 
N and 43° 30' N to 21° 00' W. According to weather forecasts a visi- 
bility of approximately 8 miles is to be expected off the Spanish 
northwestern coast and northeast of the Azores; visibility will probably 
increase further on 12 Sep. The reconnaissance mission brought' no 
results.- Group V.'est kept Y/ESERLAKD, SPICHERN and BRAKE informed about 
weather reports and German reconnaissance activity. Up to daybreak no 
reports from German sources were received about the fate of the merchant 
vessels spotted and attacked by enemy aircraft; these are undoubtedly 
our blockade runners. 

At 2225 the tanker ERMLAND, proceeding from La Pallice to St. Nazaire, 
was damaged by a nine, but continued on her course with one engine. 

Channel Coast : 

The mine-laying operations "Nacht" and "Falter" as well as the 
mine-laying mission of the 5th PT Boat Flotilla were carried out during 
the night of 10 Sep. according to plan. For short report of 5th PT 
Boat Flotilla see Telegram 0820. 

Enemy ships north and northeast of Cherbourg were located and shelled by 
Army coastal batteries; it is assumed that these ships were operating 
against our PT boats. 

Torpedo missions of the 2nd, 4th and 6th PT Boat Flotillas, totalling 
14 boats, directed against convoy traffic brought no results as far as 
steamers were concerned. The boats made contact, however, with light 
enemy combat forces. A crippled enemy motor launch was captured and 
taken in tow by boats of the 2nd PT Boat Flotilla after her crew had 
been rescued by another British ship — whether all or only part of the 
crew is not clear from the report. All secret documents, the radar set 
and charts were captured. The captured launch was handed over to patrol 
vessels and tugs off Den Holder, which brought her safely into port. 

Some of our PT boats suffered slight damage and casualties. According 
to prisoner statements, all of the enemy motor gunboats and motor 
launches had sailed from their bases at 1800 of 10 Sep. for the purpose 
of intercepting our PT boats. For short reports of the 3 flotillas in- 
volved in this action see Telegrams 1929, 1900, and 2135. 



-S- 



B-1052 



* 



i 



11 Sep. 1942 



CONFIDENTIAL 



Although the operation did not attain its original 
object, it was a gratifying success through the capture 
of the enemy ship, the documents, and the radar set. 



Special Item; 



An inquiry of the Naval Staff brought the following reply from Group 
West: 

The Commanding Admiral, France reports that apart from the Casquets, the 
following naval posts exist on isolated cliffs and in lighthouses 
located beyond the coastal defenses: 

a. Area of the Admiral, Channel Coast: 

Radio beacon Vierville (to be transferred shortly to the base-) 

Lighthouse and radio beacon Ver 

Lighthouse Cape de la Hague 

Radio beacon Linreville (transfer to Anoville in progress) 

Lighthouse Le Grand Jardin, located on a rock oi"f St. Malo 

Lighthouse at Naval Signal Station Corbiere 

Lighthouse Sercq 

b. Area of the Admiral, Western France: 

Roches Douvres, La Paon Roseda, La Croix (entrance of 
Lezardrieux) , Les Heaux de Brehat, Les Sept lies de la Batz, lie 
Vierge, Les Pierres No ires, Ar Men, and lie Penfret. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

At 1040 a submarine v/as sighted off Ijmulden by a control 
vessel of the Admiral, Holland, which may have had some connection v/ith 
the attempted flight of 2 Dutch engineers in a paddle boat. 

Own Situation : 

During the night of 10 Sep. a great number of enemy planes 
flew in and out of the ares of the Admiral, Holland. 1 low-flying 
plane was shot down by naval anti-aircraft artillery. Bombs were 
dropped near Rotterdam and mines off Terschelling. Patrol boats shot 
down 2 more planes. 

The diving tender OLDENBURG was attacked by enemy planes on 10 Sep. in 
the German Bight; no damage v/as inflicted. A group of 2 patrolling 
vessels was attacked at 0445 by an enemy PT boat in quadrant AN 8315; 
patrol vessel "1239" was severely damaged by a torpedo hit and suffered 
casualties; she was towed to Terschelling. Due to the report about an 
enemy submarine off Ijmuiden the area is being kept under surveillance 
and an investigation of the matter is under way. It is suspected that 
mines wero dropped on the approach to Hook of Holland. 

6 mines were swept in the area of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, 
North, 1 of them by a mine-sweeping plane. 



-El- 



co:.Ti3z:niAL 

11 Sep. 1942 

Convoy and patrol service according to plan. The Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, ITorth reports that the British vessel towed to Den Kelder 
was identified as notor gunboat "335". 

Group north points out that last night's lively enemy activity in the 
Scheldt estuary, reports about parachutists, heavy air activity, 
British PT boats and gunboats off the Dutch coast, and the submarine 
sighted off Ijnuiden all merit attention. 

2. Norway ; 

Enemy planes were active over Petsamo on 8 and 9 Sep., over 
Kirkenes on 10 Sep. and over Stavanger on 11 Sep. 

Convoy and minesweeping operations proceeded without incident accord- 
ing to plan. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway reports his intention to assign 3 mine- 
laying vessels to lay the 7 anti-submarine barrages between Kristian- 
sand South and Stavanger in 2 stages probably on 18 Sep. For details 
see Telegram 1270. 

With regard to Group North's suggestion to provide a minefield against 
surface forces east of the anti-submarine barrage in the closed Baroe 
area, the Commanding Admiral, Norway points out that the Naval Staff 
turned down a similar plan as long ago as 10 L'ar. 1941. (See Tele- 
gram 1920. ) 

3. Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

According to an intelligence report of 10 Sep. from Denmark, 
a convoy of 8 steaners sailed from Hval Fjord for Russia on 7 Sep.; 
this is probably part of convoy PQ 18. 

Air reconnaissance brought no further information. 

Own Situation ; 

On the basis of reports from the Admiral, Arctic Ocean and 
Group North, the Naval Staff submitted the following summary of the 
day's events to the Fuehrer Headquarters, the Armed Forces High Com- 
mand and the Commander in Chief, Air Force: 

(1) No new information was received concerning convoys PQ 18 and Of 14. 

(2) The task force of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers transferred 
according to plan and anchored in Kaa Fjord at 0400 on 11 Sep. The 
force was detected by the enemy (by their radio intercept service) when 
emerging from the Gimsoestraumen and the Gavle Fjord. An enemy sub- 
marine in quadrant A3 9858 fired a 4-fan, but missed. 

The 5th Destroyer Flotilla reports that the ECK0LDT will leave 3or,en 
Bay for Alta Fjord at 0600 on* 12 Sep. 



o v 



Visibility in the western portion of the 5th Air Force's reconnaissance 
sector w£.s greatly reduced by rain, snow squalls, and in parts also by 
fog settling on the surface, all of which explains why PQ 18 could not 
be observed. 



-7— sufef^arines of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean will be posted as or 13 Sep. 

B-1052 



-B- 



confidential 

11 Sep. 1942 

at 1200 in a patrol line extending from quadrant AB 32 to quadrant AB 3$. 



IV. Skar.errtk. Baltic Sea Entrances. Baltic Sea 

Convoy and patrol missions in the area of the Commanding Admiral , 
Defenses, Baltic Sea were carried out according to plan. Group North 
is unable at present to comply with his suggestion for reinforcing the 
minesweepers. (See War Diary of 10 Sep.) The Group points out that th$ 
small available forces of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea 
must be concentrated on the principal traffic routes as in the area of 
the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North, and thst traffic must be re- 
routed and limited to a few ports. For this reason it is urgent that 
the bulk of traffic be shifted from Aalborg to Aarhuus, as planned by the 
Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea. If necessary the Hirtshals 
area will have to be kept closed for some time. The main traffic must 
be routed east of Laesoe-Anholt through very deep water. (See Telegram 
1351.) 

I 
Mine-sweeping activity in the area of the Commander, Minesweepers, Baltic 

Sea was reduced to a minimum on account of bad weather. 

Convoy operations proceeded without interference according to plan. 

V/ith respect to the demand of the Swedish Navy that German troop trans- 
ports should not use the Palsterbo Canal, Group North has taken a stand, 
which in the opinion of the German Naval Attache at Stockholm, may have 
political repercussions. The Naval Attache at Stockholm requests new 
instructions. For details see War Diary, Part C, Vol. VIII. In this 
connection the Commanding Admiral, Group North, recommends urgently that 
any rights which v/e may have for using the Canal not be sacrificed for 
petty political considerations. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

As revealed by intercepted radio messages, subchasers were 
directed against a periscope allegedly sighted in the eastern portion of 
the Firth of Forth. 

Very lively reconnaissance activity ranged over the Bay of Biscay as 

far as the northern Spanish coast. A submarine proceeding on a southerly 

course was attacked by a plane southeast of Cape St. Vincent. 

8 submarine sighting reports were intercepted off the American coast, and 
2 from the Caribbean; a submarine attack was also reported from the 
Caribbean Sea. 

2. Own Situation : 

Regarding the operations of the Norwegian submarines see Sit- 
uation Arctic Ocean. The operations of Group "Vorwaerts" in the North 
Atlantic against the westbound convoy continued with good results. 



-0.3$- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

Submarine D "92" torpedoed a 4,000 GRT steamer; she was not observed to 

sink. 

Submarine U "96" sank a sailing vessel by gunfire. 

Submarine U "380" fired a 4-fan at a 9,000 GRT tanker; 3 detonations^ 
were heard but no result observed. 

Submarine U "211" observed 4 hits on 4 steamers with a 4-fan; no sink- 
ings were observed. 

The reports received give no indication to what degree 
the attacked ships were damaged or sunk. 

Submarine U "92" heard 2 detonations as a result of a 4-fan fired against 
a destroyer. 

Reports about achievements off the American coast v/ere not received. 

Submarine "U 514" sank 2 steamers totalling 12,000 GRT off Barbados and 
the schooner HELEN F0RSEY" in quadrant DD 92 by gunfire. 

Nothing of particular importance was reported from the South Atlantic 
and the Mediterranean. , 

A highly deplorable loss is the death of Commander 
Muetzelburg the captain of submarine U "203", as the 
result of an accident. 

Additional reports in supplement to Submarine Situation, V.'ar Diary, Part 
B, Vol. IV. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 
nothing to report. 

2. Mediterranean Theater ; 

In the Africa Corps area dive bomber and fighter bomber attacks 
were carried out with good results. 

3. Eastern Front : 

81 enemy planes were shot down at the various Army sectors. 

Reconnaissance flights of 6 FW 200' s in the Arctic Ocean furnished no 
information due to bad weather. 

An enemy camp at Eina Guba and camps and debarkations at Plkyushev v/ere 
raided with observed good results. 

Special Item t 

The Commanding Admiral, Group North reports that only one of the 8 mine- 
sweeping planes allocated to Group North on 16 Aug. by the Commander in 
Chief, Air Force has been received so far and requests that the promised 

I 1 B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

remaining planes be assigned as soon as possible in view of the acute 
threat from ground nines. 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean : 

The CIIARY3DIS sailed from Gibraltar during the night of 10 
Sep. in an unknown direction. None of the ships reported off Cape de 
Gata on 9 Sep. was observed in the Mediterranean, so that this report 
was probably in error. 

Otherwise nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

Enemy planes raided Tobruk during the night of 10 Sep.; no 
damage was reported. 

At 0150 of 10 Sep. the Italian hospital ship ARNO en route from Naples 
to Tobruk was torpedoed by enemy planes north of Tobruk and sank 9 
hours later. 200 men were rescued, 70 are missing. Further details 
must be awaited. 

The decision of the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff regarding 
the proposal of the German General attached to Italian High Command 
Headquarters about the minefield in the Strait of Sicily conforms to 
the wishes of the Naval Staff (see War Diary of 8 Sep.). 

For copy of telegram see l/Skl 22403/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. XIII. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

Tanker A3RUZZI, which was damaged on 1 Sep., was towed from the 
emergency port of Ras el Hilal to Benghazi on 10 Sep. 

Transports proceeded according to plan and without major incident. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea ; 

The naval situation remained unchanged on 10 and 11 Sep. 

Group South submits a report of the Commanding Admiral, Aegean Sea, 
which had already been brought to the knowledge of the Commander in 
Chief, Navy during his visit to the Crimea; it calls attention to the 
fact that the funds at the Navy's disposal will be completely exhausted 
by 15 Sep. by payments for ship repairs and materials due to the infla- 
tion of Greek currency. The same situation will arise in the adminis- 
trative section and will necessitate discontinuing of all ship repair 
work on 15 Sep., Including work on the steamer MENES . Since the Greek 
workmen will disperse, it will later be necessary to build up from 
scratch a working force for the shipyards and repair shops. The Com- 
manding Admiral, Aegean Sea warns of the gravity of the situation. 
(See Telegram 1210.7 



05- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

With these conditions in mind Group South requests a decision whether: 

a. The order limiting funds for -Greece is to be revoked, or 

b. Repair v/ork, new construction and acquisition of supplies is 
to be stopped. (See Telegram 1230.) 

The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division will study this natter and con- 
sult the Armed Forces High Command as well as the Ministries of 
Economics and Finance. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Radio monitoring has been intercepting messages from a 
battleship, escorted by flotilla leader K?IARK0V and 2 destroyers, in 
the southeastern part of the Black Sea since the evening of 10 Sep., 
and another destroyer in the northeastern part. A submarine was 
located at 1930 northeast of Cape Sinope. 

Reconnaissance planes sighted a small northbound convoy off Sochi and a 
southbound escorted merchant vessel west of Sukhum. 

According to a report from the Naval Defense Unit Black Sea, the 
flotilla leader TASHKENT and the destroyer BDITELNIY are lying on the 
bottom of the harbor of Novorossisk, their guns removed. 

Own Situation : 

4 vessels of the 3rd k Mine Sweeper Flotilla swept 15 mines 
between Kerch and Anapa. Off Anapa a Russian barrage of inertia 
contact mines was found. Otherwise mine-sweeping operations proceeded 
according to plan. 

A single-row net barrage v/as laid off Feodosiya. 

It was belatedly reported that a third Italian subchaser was damaged 
during the enemy air raid on Yalta on 9 Sep. 

Convoy service proceeded uneventfully. 

Group South reports that only 3 German PT boats and 3 Italian subchasers, 
aside from the small submarines, will be available for operations until 
the beginning of October. The naval barges engaged in operation 
"Bluecher" have suffered considerable dar.age and require repair 
urgently before they can be used at sea. The Group therefore proposes 
to Army Group A that these naval barges be replaced immediately by 
Siebel ferries for a period of 3 weeks. (See Telegram 1230.) 

Naval Group South anticipates an intensification of activity on the 
part of the Russian Black Sea fleet; due to lack of offensive weapons 
of its own, the Group further proposes to Army Group A and the 4th Air 
Force that they paralyze the. enemy by air attacks. 

A copy of this proposal was submitted to the Naval Staff with the re- 
mark that Group South believes it necessary to inform also the Armed 
Forces High Command. 

The Naval Staff therefore informed the Armed Forces High 
Command, Operations Staff of the above. 



-036- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
11 Sep. 1942 

Group South further informed the Naval Staff about its protest to Army 
Group A against the use of the Array' 8 motor boat group "Loeper" for 
coastal oatrols off NovorossiBk which was placed under the command of 
Army Group Ruoff. (See Telegram 1400.) 

This step corresponds to the viewpoint of the Naval Staff, 
too. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



IX. Array Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Array Group A ; 

Fighting immediately east of Novorossisk continues. West of 
Mozdok an assault detachment of tanks succeeded in breaking through the 
enemy position south of the Terek River and in advancing beyond the 
Kurp River. An enemy armored train was stopped north of Grozny. 

Array Group B : 

The battle for Stalingrad continues. An enemy attack at the 
juncture of German and Italian forces at Bolshoi was halted by an 
Italian counterattack. 

Central Array Group : 

Enemy attacks on both sides of the Volga River and the 
Zubtsov-Rzhev road were repulsed by the "Grossdeutschland" Infantry 
Division. Otherwise nothing to report. 

Northern Army Group : 

The enemy attacked at Soltsy, south of Lake Ladoga and on the 
Neva River sector. 

2. Finnish Front : 

Enemy attacks on the Kandalaksha sector were repulsed. Lively 
ship traffic was observed in Motovsky Bay in the direction of the 
Rybachi Peninsula. 

3. North Africa : 

No situation report was received from the Panzer Army. 



-137- B " 105 2 



confidential 

12 Sep. 1942 

Iters of Political Importance 

Z'r.e significance of Africa for Allied warfare is being discussed in 
the U.S. press at the nresent tine. It La said that Roosevelt's 
and Churchill's speeches clearly forecast an Allied offensive to 
regain control of the Mediterranean. If any major operation against 
Gerr.ar.y is to be undertaken from the west , it is inperative to 
secure the Allied Mediterranean flank. It is known that U.S. troops 
recently landed in the Belgian Congo. The problem of Africa fron a 
strategic angle is also being discussed in the Spanish press. 

Great Britain : 

lbs Trade Union Convention rejected a notion denanding the immediate 
establishment of the second front and decided to leave the decision 
and the tir.ing of this natter to the Government. This resolution is 
considered as a personal success for Churchill and as consolidating 
the position of the V.'ar Cabinet. 

Spain : 

The Transocean Mews Agency reports that Suner is gathering a circle of 
loyal personalities who are to prepare his return to political 
activity. Prominent friends of Suner hcve resigned their membership 
in the Falangist organization. It was officially announced that the 
leaders of the Falange and the civil governors of 4 provinces have 
resigned. 

The reorganization of the Cabinet does not appear to 
have eased the internal political tension. 

Iran : 

The G-erman News Agency (2MB) reports from Istanbul that all combat 
forces of the Russian occupation army in western Iran have been 
withdrawn. Only special forces of the Police Commissariat have been 
left behind. Unrest continues and also the insurrection of the Kurds 
gained momentum. 

Argentina : 

According to a Spanish report, the Minister of the Interior has 
ordered the crew of the GRAF SPEE to be interned in a guarded con- 
centration camp in order to prevent further attempts to escape. 



Special Items : 

I. As regards preparations for operation "Ilona", Group West plans 
to concentrate the naval forces and farces of the Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, '.Vest in the take-off ports at the beginning of a 10-day 
advance warning period which the Commanding General, Armed Forces, 
'.Vest will announce. The Army is planning to capture the various 
ports by land without assistance on the Navy's part. Thus there are 
no Army units to be embarked. Apart from a request to have 1,000 E1C 
mines and 1,000 type B anti-submarine mines ready in time at Chateaudun, 
the Group reports that plans for laying barrages can only be made after 
the situation is ripe for it. It may become necessary to call for 2 
mine-laying vessels. 

-138- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



12 Sep. 19U2 



The Naval Staff approves these plans and is investigating what 
quantity of mines can he placed at the Group's disposal as operational 
reserve at Chateaudun. 

With reference to the Fuehrer's directive concerning operation "Ilona", 
the Naval Staff points out that the war situation does not permit 
accumulating armament, ammunition, etc. exclusively for operation 
"Ilona". The Commanding Admiral, Prance has meanwhile made considerable 
demands which have led to a depletion of the torpedo supply of the 
Commanding Admiral, Submarines. Group West is therefore requested to 
reexamine the measures ordered for immediate execution with this 
in mind. 

II. In the course of preliminary planning for operation "Aida" the 
Naval Staff called on the German Naval Command, Italy to analyze 
the possibilities of using Italian special weapons in the North 

Sea and the Channel and also Italian subchasers in the Mediterranean 
to reinforce the 3 rd - Pl ! Boat Flotilla. (See War Diary of 15 Jun. 
and File "Aida".) In the opinion of the German Naval Command, 
Italy, standard Italian subchasers offer no prospects of success 
in torpedo and mine-laying operations off the English south and 
southeastern coasts, an opinion which coincides with that held by' 
the Naval Staff. As far as the commitment of Italian subchasers 
for the support of the 3 rd PT Boat Flotilla is concerned, the 
German Naval Command, Italy calls attention to the fact that 
the Italian Navy has just transferred 12 subchasers to North Africa 
which are engaged in operations there. The German Naval Command, 
Italy holds that it is impossible to include them in German PT boat 
operations because of insufficient training, even if they could 
be placed under German command, which is highly improbable. 

III. The Commander in Chief, Navy ordered the allocation of gun 
barges to Norway. (See War Diary of 11 Sep.) At the present time 

6I4. naval barges are in use in Norway. II4.9 more are under construction, 
10 of which have been assigned for use as guncarriers to the Command- 
ing Admiral, Defenses, West, and 10 to the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, North. 39 are reserved for the Admiral, Amphibious Forces for 
operation "Wiesengrund"; he already has 8l completed barges for 
that purpose at his disposal. Consequently 90 of the barges under 
construction have not yet been allocated and could be equipped 
as guncarriers immediately. Should operation "Wiesengrund be can- 
celled and the 120 barges allotted to it not be required for other 
operations, these, too, would become available. It must be con- 
sidered, however, that motor barges once fitted as guncarriers 
would require another reconversion if they were to be used as trans-*- 
ports later on, so that only those that are absolutely needed 
should be converted into guncarriers. The Commanding Admiral, 
Norway is requested (copy to Group North) to report how many 
guncarriers are considered necessary to reinforce the coastal de- 
fenses in the Norwegian area. 

IV. It can be expected that Russian ships will attempt to pass 
through the Dardanelles in the event that all Russian Black Sea 
bases are eliminated. Such an attempt on the part of warships 
would be a violation of the Montreux Convention, the stipulations of 
which would probably be invoked by Turkey, Similar restrictions 

do not exist, however, in the case of merchant vessels. The Naval 
Staff is therefore investigating whether and how the stipulations of 
the Montreux Convention could be applied to merchant vessels, too. 
Should this question be clarified in our favor, the Naval Staff 
intends to suggest that the Foreign Office get in touch with Turkey. 



—139- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 

12 Sep. IQI4.2 

Situation 12 Sep. 19^2 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report, 

2. Neutrals : 

The Portuguese Ambassador informed the Foreign Office that 
the Portuguese steamer LUANG sailed from Baltimore to Havana at 1600, 
and that steamer VILLA FRANCA will sail on or after 13 Sep. from 
San Joan to Portugal. 

3« Own Situation ; 

Ships "28" and "23" are informed about the operations 
of Group "Eisbaer" by Radiogram 1856. The Naval Staff leaves it to 
the two auxiliary cruisers to meet for a discussion of their respective 
zones of operation until withdrawal of the submarines from the South 
Atlantic. Until an agreement is reached the longitude of I5 W 
remains the boundary line between these zones. 

Radiogram I918 advises the DRESDEN to proceed from point "Rose" directly 
to point "Dispache". 

The suggestion of the Naval Attache at Tokyo to mine the eastern 
entrance of the strait is declined for political reasons. (See 
Telegram 0100.) 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo reports that the Japanese Admiralty's 
permission for operations by ship "10" on her voyage to the 
Sunda Straits should be construed to mean merely an agreement to 
a shift of the ship's zone of operation. It is not to be construed 
as an approval of a visit to Japan, which is still dependent on the 
adjustment of the oil problem, as clearly stated by the Japanese. 
The Attache recommends that ship "13" should under no circumstances 
be allowed to proceed to Japan unless the oil supply problem has 
been settled. (See Telegram II58.) 

Radiogram lo21 notifies all ships in foreign waters that after" f 

13 Sep. submarines are prohibited from attacking unescorted single 
ships on route "Anton". Enemy situation report by Radiograms 0753 
and O3I4.I. 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo reports the information gathered from a 
British radio operator who had been aboard the GEDANIA as member 
of the prize crew. This man stated that the GEDANIA was captured 
on 1+ Jun. 19^1 by an auxiliary cruiser; measures to scuttle the 
ship were Ineffective, the explosion going off mainly in the interior. 
All secret documents were allegedly thrown overboard so that none 
of them fell into enemy hands. The crew remained unharmed. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance revealed the following shi ps- at --Pl ymouth 

-1*0- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



12 Sep. I9J4.2 



in the afternoon: 2 battleships, one of them in dock, 3 cruisers, 
one of them in dock, 2 destroyers, 2 submarines, etc. 

Photo reconnaissance of 10 Sep. on the southern coast from Portland 
to Eastbourne showed no change in the number of landing craft. The 
areas west of Portland and east of Eastbourne were not covered. 
Changes regarding the anchorages of landing craft in the Poole area 
and the presence on the beach of Cowes of boats previously observed 
at Southamptom indicates that landing maneuvers are going on 
continuously, 

2» Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

SPICHERN reported at 0259: "Am breaking off operation, 
my position 6° 30' W. Require assistance urgently. Plane at 0800." 

From the grouping of the signal it is believed that the vessel 
is undamaged. 

Croup Y.est informs the SPICHERN that the intention to discontinue 
operation is approved and that 3 torpedo boats are leaving St. Jean 
de Luz immediately to meet her* 

The BRAKE receives orders to "break off mission, return immediately, 
escort forces will meet you at the point of departure." 

Both ships are informed that assistance by air forces may be 
expected after daybreak. (See Radiogram 6144-8.) 

The Group reports the measures taken to the Naval Staff by Radio- 
gram 0505* 

3 German planes took off at O63O and at O7I+O . 

WESERLAND is notified by Group West that the weather forecast indicates 
a visibility of 5 to 8 miles along her probable route, 

SPICHERN was picked up by. the 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla at 10l+0 in 
quadrant BF 97^7« Her port engine is out of commission due to 
explosion of a bomb near the ship. BRAKE is under way to La Pallice, 

Thus for the first time a breakthrough attempt of the 
2 blockade runners has failed. WESERLAND and UCKERMARK 
seem to have been luckier this time. 

Channel Coast : 

Mine-laying mission "Schlaf" was carried out according 
to plan. Nothing else to report. 

Special Items; 

Group West submitted its reply to the questions regarding 
the Casquets outpost; relayed by £he Operations Division, Naval 
Staff from Fuehrer Headquarters. The fact is stressed that Casquets 
is not a strong point but merely an advanced post. Group West 
believes that the post was taken by a ruse, because no signs of a 
struggle have been found; access to the cliff appears possible only 



-141- 



B-1052 



confidential 

12 Sep. 151+2 

with the aid of people thoroughly :srdllar with the locality, 
which could have been provided by the f cc-er Iritish ii .;se 

crew which had fled to England. ^ or copy of the report which 
ansners all questions in great detail see l/Skl 22&21/U2. Gkdoe . 
in "ar Diary, Part C, Vol. II b. 



111. Ntrth sea, Norway, Arctic Coear. 
la North Sea : 

hery Situation ; 
Nothing to report. 

Own Situati or. : 

During the engagement of 11 Sep. 2 British motor gun 
teats were severely darnel and had to be taken in tow bw ether (^ 

vessels. An enemy attempt at boarding patrol vessel VP " 1239" 
was foiled with hand grenades. Another attack by 2 motor rune rats 
on a group of patrol vessels at point "Alex" is reported from the 
Dutch coast as having taken place during the night of 10 -e:,; 
on thla occasion 1 hit was observed on each of the attackers, while 
our patrol vessels suffered no dar^r, 

Steamer IITTKAR KOEI struck a mine in quadrant AH 6999 at O505 and 

lis towed into the Elbe estuary. 

The request of the Co-render in Chief, Air Force concerning 
fighter protection for Swedish convoys in the --ermar -ight -aas 
relayed to Group Berth bj the Naval Staff. In this connection 
the Group reports that fighter protection will be provided to the 
t. :ent warranted by the available forces. 

2. Norway : 

Steamer ROBERT BORNHOFEN (6,6k3 GET) carrying coal sank 
en route from Irons oe to Kirkenes 6 miles south o: Fcnningsvaag 
following an explosion, the cause of which Is not known yet. 4 

: he : : mar. ding Admiral, Norway reports that the remaining I4. vessels 
of the 5th Kotor Minesweeper Flotilla cannot be dismissed for 
shipyard repairs at present in view of the newly arisen su:-=rine 
situation resulting from the fleet operations arainst convoy P^ 18. 

Group North directs the Commanding Admiral, Norway to lay the 
anti-sdc marine barrages between F.r; sand South and Stavanger 

at the earliest possible moment. The ij.th Mineswe Flotilla 

not be withdrawn from northern Norway for the time being. 
Nine -laying shits ?.CIA : and 3KAGERRAE, lying at Swinemuenie, 
ant FAISE? at Mesermuer.de are assigned t: the operational cimmar.d 
of the Commanding Admiral, Norway. 

The Armed Forces High Command consiiers it unnecessary that the 
COBimanling C-eneral, Armed Forces, Norway should be hookei up 
directly with the Air Force - Navy circuit. Both tiie Ccmmar .zLr.z 
Admiral, Norway and the 5 th Air Force are resp:r.si: le for informing 
the Commanding General, Armed Forces, Norway concerning the naval 

-142- 



confidential 



12 Sep. 1°U2 



situation and air reconnaissance of interest to him; they also 
furnish him with a survey of the over-all situation based on the 
various individual reports after evaluation. (See Telegram 1700.) 

This decision refers to a request submitted by 
the Commanding General, Armed Forces, Norway. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway we3com.es the announcement of the Naval 
Staff about the manufacture of cutter floats suitable for depths 
of 100 m to 500 m and will use them in the future for new flanking 
barrages; however, he considers it impossible to lay them in 
addition to and in front of already existing flanking barrages, 
because mine-laying vessels cannot be used in the dangerous 
neighborhood of the minefields and because the motor minesweepers, 
which alone ai'e suitable for this purpose, would have to be 
withdrawn from their other activities for many months. 

To this the Naval Staff remarks that these protective barrages can 
also be laid at greater distances from existing minefields without 
losing any of their effectiveness. It is acknowledged that the 
Commanding Admiral, Norway is sho.-t of vessels. As a matter of 
principle, the possibility 01 laying cutter floats later should 
be kept in mind. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Operation against convoy PQ lS ; 

a. Convoy PQ 18 was spotted at I32O in quadrant AB I16I4.2 
by air reconnaissance. It was proceeding on a 7O course and 
consisted of 27 merchant vessels, 1 aircraft carrier, and 5 destroyers. 
Since IS03 submarine U "i|.05" has been maintaining contact with 

the convoy in quadrant AB 2787* The positions reported by the 
submarine and by the Air Force do not agree; it is assumed chat 
the latter' s report is incorrect, 

b. A heavy enemy force (2 battleships, 1 heavy 
cruiser, 5 destroyers) was sighted by air reconnaissance at 1215 
in quadrant AE 263I. General course 3O . 

At 1205 the Air Force reported 3 light cruisers, 5 destroyers and 
1 tanker in quadrant AG 4877 on a 23O course, position not 
clearly defined (by weather observation plane). At IOJ4.O another 
plane reported 8 destroyers on varying courses in quadrant AG 7861. 
These reports may refer to the same enemy force; it seems that 
light combat forces are refueling at the position mentioned. 

d. Thus far 3 submarines are operating against the 
convoy; 5 more are approaching the passage between Bear Island 
and the South Cape. 

Fuehrer Headquarters, the Armed Forces High Command, Operations 
Staff, and the Operations Staff, Air Force were informed of the 
above by the Naval Staff. 

The Admiral, Arctic Ocean combined the 7 submarines operating 
against convoy PQ 18 into a special group "Traegertod". "Nomen sit 
omen." ("Traegertod" = the death of the carrier. Tr. N.) 



-l4j- B-105 2 



COHFID; 



12 Sep. lQi+2 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Mine-exploding vessel n 2l± n struck a mine In the Great Belt 
and was towed to Kiel. Convoy operations in the area of the 
Commanding .-.iniral, Defenses, Baltic Sea proceeded according to 
plan. 

The laying of minefields "Sauna IV" and_"Seeigel 5I4. " in the area 
of the Commander, Minesweepers, ealtic £>ea was prevented by bad 
weather, Mlnesweeping activity had to be curtailed. 

A Finnish steamer was torpedoed by an enemy submarine on the 
evening of 11 Sep. in the Gulf of Bothnia about 50 miles east 
of Gaevle and another Finnish steamer at noon of 11 Sep. in the 
southern Aaland Sea. A3 a consequence transport and convoy 
service from Libau to Heval has been suspended. 

Group North has now modified the minelaying plans of the Commander, 
Minesweepers, Baltic Sea for the prevention of a possible break- 
through of the Russian fleet, and has canceled the plan for a 
barrage east of the "Seeigel" barrage; instead, the Group has 
ordered that an uninterrupted mine belt extending from the Finnish 
inter-island passages to the Esthonian coast, west and south of 
the "Seeigel" minefield, be laid, which is to be made particularly 
strong at points where the Russian ships might attempt a break- 
through. This operation (code name "Seeteuf el" ) , in which the 
Finnish Naval Staff is to participate, is to be carried out with 
all available German and Finnish mines and cotter floats. In 
addition, provisions are to be made for the immediate laying of 
cutter floats and interspersed mines ea3t of the "Nashorn" 
minefield and In the "Sauna" and "Brummbaer" areas in case of an 
emergency. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

The Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping submits a survey 
of the Intended use of shipping space in September 19^2: 

The tonnage needed for Armed Forces supplies and other important 
supplies for Norway have Increased to approximately 700,000 - 
750,000 tons. It remains to be seen whether the quantities 
provided for northern Norway can be handled by the harbors of the 
area* 

Tonnage needed for Finland amounts to approximately 130,000 tons, 
for the 3altic countries approximately 75,000 to 120,000 tons. 

For shipments of coal from the North Sea approximately 300,000 
to 350»QOO. tons are needed. 

In view of the advanced season and the supply situation, the 
shipment of Lulea ore and of timber for mines, paper manufacture 
and tu"lding purposes must be speeded as much as possible. Greatest 
importance is to be placed therefore on stepping up the circulation 
of available tonnage. There must be no interference with shipping 
on the transport routes. 

It Is difficult to Increase ore shipments as ordered by the Fuehrer, 

tM- &-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
12 Sep. 19U2 

since neutral tonnage is carrying the bulk of a 11 shipments and 
any increase in the amount or German shipping space would be 
possible only at the expense of the transports to Norway, The 
Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping assumes therefore that 
it will hardly be possible to raise the amount of September 
shipments considerably over 1,200,000 tons. 

Group North, the Commanding Admiral, Norway and Naval Station, 
Baltic were notified of the above by the Naval Staff, 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1, Enemy Situation ; 

Regarding operations against convoy P^ 18 see Own 
Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

Radio monitoring intercepted messages of British planes reporting 
sighting several German submarines west of Faeroe Islands. Reports 
from British warships about a surfaced submarine were intercepted 
from the same area. 

Reconnaissance over the Bay of Biscay was again particularly lively. 

From the American coast and the West Indies I4. reports about sighting 
submarines were received. Barbados reports the shelling of Bridge- 
town. 

According to an intelligence report from Portugal, a convoy of 
l8 British and U.S. steamers sailed from New York for Capetown 
on 7 Sep. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Submarine U "25I" reports firing a torpedo which missed 
at a Russian submarine in quadrant AC 828b and firing at the 
radio staV.on and storehouses on Einsamkeit Island on. 8 Sep. 



The operation of Group "Vorwaerts" against the convoy in the North 
Atlantic continued successfully. Submarine U "608" sank 2 steamers 
of 5,000 GRT each, 1 of 10,000 GRT and 1 of 9,000 GRT. Submarine 
U "I+Oii" reported sinking a 6,000 GRT tanker and firing 5 single 
torpedoes at 3 ships; tne sinking of 2 of them was established 
beyond doubt by sound detection. The total sunk is estimated 
at 11,000 GRT. The submarine reported the convoy as consisting of 
18 steamers sailing In 2 widely dispersed groups and protected by 
6 escort vessels. 

The 9,000 GRT ship reported sunk by submarine U "608" proved to 
be steamer HEKT0RIA of 13,800 GRT, 

The last reported sighting by submarine U "96" puts the strength 
of the convoy at 12 to 15 steamers and 2 destroyers. Submarine 
U "i|ll" reported only 10 or 11 smoke clouds. 

The operation is being continued. 

A new group, "Pfeil", consisting of 9 submarines is reported from 



-145- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
12 Sep. 19^2 

the eastern North Atlantic; they are stationed on a line from 
quadrant AL klkb to 7816. 

No successes were reported from the American coast and from the 
V^est Indies. 

Group "litis" of the South Atlantic submarines is ordered to 
assume position in patrol line from quadrants DH 73J4.8 to DH 7358 
in order to intercept an SL convoy. 

Nothing to report from the Mediterranean. 

Additional reoorts in Supplement to Submarine Situation, V«ar Diary^ 
Part B, Vol. IV. 

The Naval Staff informs the commanding Admiral, Submarines (copy 
to Group toest) that the order forbidding attacks on route "Anton" 
is extended to the area south of latitude 20° N as of 1* Sep. at 
2000; this measure is due to operations of blockade runners. 
Thus the entire route "Anton" is closed for attacks. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

During the day reconnaissance activity and fighter 
bomber attacks on Salisbury, the results of which were not observed. 
Mines were laid off the English eastern coast. 

2. Mediterranean Theater : 

Operations in support of the Panzer Army Africa. Malta 
was attacked by Italian planes during the night of 11 Sep. 

3« Eastern Front : 

57 enemy planes were shot down at the various Army 
sectors. Reconnaissance activity over the Black Sea and Caspian 
Sea. 

For operations against convoy PQ, 18 see Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

Special Item : 

See Telegram I325 for directive of the Armed Forces High Command, 
Operations Staff concerning the participation of planes of the 
training units in the combined maneuvers of the Navy from 1 to 
3 Oct. 



VIII .Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 
1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean : 

An intelligence report from Spain states that the 

-146- B-1052 



I 



CONFIDENTIAL 
12 Sep. 19^2 

CHARYBJ2LS- left Gibraltar for England where she will undergo 
repairs. 

A reliable agent reports that the British Mediterranean fleet 
will shortly be heavily reinforced by U.S. warships based at 
Gibraltar. 

• 

A French report, received by way of the German Armistice Commission, 
states that 2 very large submarines on an easterly course were 
sighted on 11 Sep. at 1750 approximately 50 miles north of Algiers. 

Otherwise nothing of importance was reported from the Mediterranean 
area. 

2 • Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

An enemy air raid on Tobruk during the night of 11 Sep, 
caused no damage in the harbor. 

5 vessels of the 3rd PT Boat Flotilla transferred from Augusta 
to Porto Empedocle. 

According to the latest Italian report, the number of missing 
crew members of hospital ship ARNO amounts to 30. 

3 • Transport of Supplies to North Afric a : 

Nothing to report, 
i;. Area Naval Group South ; 

Aegean Sea : 

During the night of 11 Sep. an infantry post on the 
south coast of Crete was fired on by a surfaced submarine. Other- 
wise nothing to report. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reported at noon sighting a force 
consisting of 1 battleship, 2 cruisers, 2 destroyers, and 1 mine- 
sweeper, headed for Poti, 30 miles west of Batum. 

Radio monitoring revealed continued fleet activity. The above- 
mentioned force was identified as a battleship without the fleet 
command, flotilla leader KHARKOV, 3 destroyers, and 2 submarine 
tenders. Another destroyer was identified in the northeastern 
part of the Black Sea and a submarine tender and 9 submarines 
in an undetermined position at sea. 

According to statements from war prisoners, 6 medium-sized sub- 
marines, the gunboats LENIN and MARKIN, and several motor torpedo 
boats were at Baku at the end of lQlf-l* Up to the middle of I9I4.2 
no minefields had been laid in the Caspian Sea. 

The Frunse Naval Academy is said to have been moved from Leningrad 
to Astrakhan In August 19Ul» 800 officer candidates are supposed 
to be enrolled. 



-147- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
12 Sep. 191+2 

Another intelligence report of 12 Sep. states that the Astrakhan 
river ports are occupied by 28 paddle steamers and 16 tankers of 
[|.65,000 GRT, 55 barges of 60,800 GET, and approximately 500 small 
craft. 2 paddle steamers, 1 tanker and 21 steamers totalling 
32,800 GRT as well as 6 gunboats are lying in the Astrakhan road- 
stead. More vessels are at sea. 

Own Situation ; 

PT boat missions scheduled for the night of 11 Sep. 
were canceled due to bad weather. 

Motor minesweepers achieved results along the Crimean southwestern 
coast between Cape Sarich and Foros, and a minesweeplng plane 
in the Anapa area. Otherwise minesweeplng operations proceeded 
uneventfully and were partially hampered by the weather. 

After completion of operation "Bluecher", RA boats (probably 
foreign motor mine sweepers taken over by the Germans, TR.N) were 
assigned directly to the Commanding Admiral, Black Sea. The 
motor toat group was plsced at the disposal of the Naval Shore 
Commander, Crimea for minesweeplng in the Kerch Strait. 

Contrary to a previous report, operational staff Scheurlen 
was not disbanded, and is located at Simferopol. 

During the night of 9 Sep. the capture of the entire Novorossisk 
harbor area was completed. The pier serving coastal shipping 
and the coal yards including railroad sidings are intact. All 
storage facilities are destroyed and burnt out. All buildings 
and installations were requisiti.oned for the Navy. 

For a further intelligence report concerning the harbor of Novor- 
ossisk see Telegram 1802. 

Convoy traff ic, ' which was partly hampered by bad weather, proceeded 
without major incident. 

Special Items ; 

a. Group South requests that the 11th Army High 
Command immediately place at its disposal the wire 
communication system in the Crimea and in the Ukraine 
or that a new system be established as fast as 
possible. See Telegram 1130, 

The Chief, Communications Division, Naval Staff 
will attend to the matter. 

b. Group South states its requirements for transport 
planes. See Telegram 1200. This matter will 

be handled by the courier squadron. 



IX. Situation East Asia 

The British invasion of the Madagascar west coast placed 
Nossi-Be in the north and the ports of Majunga and Morondava in 
the hands of the enemy, British forces are penetrating farther 



-148- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
12 Sep. 19i+2 

inland. Churchill announced to the House of Commons that the 
operations against the key bases at the west coast of the island 
had to be undertaken because enemy submarines might otherwise 
operate from them against Allied shipping in the Mozambique Strait 

According to U.S. press reports, a large Japanese warship and 

a heavy cruiser were damaged by American planes on 2J4. Aug. during 

the operations in the Solomons area. 

On 28 Aug. Allied submarines allegedly sank 2 Japanese transports 
with approximately Ij., 000 men aboard off the southeastern China 
coast. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A : 

The battle south, east, and southeast of Novorossisk 
continues. The situation at the remaining sectors of the Caucasus 
front is characterized by continuous enemy attacks. Our line 
northwest of Grozny had to be taken back due to strong enemy 
pressure. 

Army Group B ; 

The offensive against Stalingrad is making slow progress 
toward stubbornly defended fortifications at the outskirts of 
the southern suburbs. Also the forces in the central and northern 
sectors of the town gained some ground. Enemy diversionary attacks 
from the north continued. Italian units threw the enemy across 
the river in the southern part of the Don River bend. However 
the enemy achieved a deep penetration into our lines west of 
Svoboda which must be eliminated. 

Central Army Group : 

Due to heavy losses the enemy had to abandon his attacks 
on both sides of the Volga at Zubtsov. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Enemy attacks south of Lake Ladoga, which had been 
anticipated, were repulsed by divisions of the 11th Army. South 
of Schluesselburg the enemy failed in a renewed attempt to cross 
the Neva River in boats. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

A strong enemy reconnaissance thrust at the Kestenga 
sector was repulsed. An enemy attack at the Kandalaksha sector 
was broken up before it got under w$y. 

3» North Africa ; 

Enemy artillery activity as usual. Reconnaissance 
activity was slight. 

tt*WttW W tt* ttW tt»tttt*4H*tttttt<HHMHt 

~**°~ B-105 2 



COIIFIDEHTIAL 
13 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Concerning the assault on Madagascar 

Laval v.:xrned that caution is necessary with regard to retaliatory steps ^ 
because the eneny is in a position to apply more effective counter- 
: casures. As a French statesman he is obliged to take this into 
account. 



•o' 



It is felt in London that Vichy must realize that a declaration of war 
on Great Britain would immediately involve the U.S.A. 

Secretary of State Hull declared that there is no reason to believe 
that relations between the U.S.A. and France will change as a result 
of the recent British step against Madagascar. 

Laval, certainly much against his will, seems to be 
straddling the fence. 

The significance of the battle for Stalingrad for the general European 
war situation is discussed by the Moscow correspondent of the Times 
and evidently represents the opinion of enemy official circles. The 
latter discount the possibility that Stalingrad can be held but believe 
that the tough and stubborn resistance is intended to weaken Germany to 
a degree which will preclude her recovery. The same purpose is 
attributed to the unceasing Russian attacks on the central and northern 
fronts. The British and Americans accept the fact that Russia's 
offensive strength is vanishing at least at an equal rate. There is 
reason to assume that Churchill, on his visit to Moscow, tried to win 
Stalin over completely to this viewpoint. He probably did not mention 
of course that the weakening of Russia is after all not deplored too 
deeply in London and Washington. 



Situation 13 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 

South Atlantic : 

According to a report of the Naval Attache at Buenos Aires, 
the air base on the Brazilian island of Fernando Norcnha has been in 
operation since 15 Aug. As early as July the Americans founded 
civilian aeronautics clubs in every town on the Brazilian coast; 
regular coastal patrol service is to be organized with planes delivered 
to these clubs. 

Indian Ocean : 

A London periodical briefly discusses the blockade-runner 
traffic between Germany and Japan. It voices the assumption that the 
blockade-runners sail around Cape Horn. Judging by the character of thp 
magazine, the matter was discussed primarily because of an interest in 
the cargo, so that not too much importance should be attributed to the 
strategic aspects of the discussion. 






.150- B-1052 



* 



CONFIDENTIAL 
13 Sep. 1942 

2. Own Situation : 

At 2017 ship "28" reported by short signal having captured 
thus far a total of 11 vessels of 77,000 GRT. She also reported heavy 
steamer traffic in large quadrant GQ 45. The Naval Staff acknowledged 
receipt of the message and informs all ships in foreign waters to that 
effect by Radiogram 2105. 

By Radiogram 2345 the Naval Staff notifies ships "28" and "23" that the 
UCKERKARK will reach quadrant GD around 24 Sep. and that the BRAKE was 
recalled because of an air attack. Ship "28" should therefore transfer 
the mail and war diary to the TAlTNENFELS and, if possible, leave all 
supplies for ship "23" aboard. Apart from a 3 months supply, the 
UCKERKARK is also carrying an Arado plane for ship "28". A second Aradq 
is packed in cases and is meant for ship "10". A meeting of the 
UCKERKARK and ship "23" is not planned for the time being. (See Radio- 
gram 2545. ) 

V/ESERLAND is notified that the Naval Staff is taking over command at 
1200; the first sailing orders are transmitted by Radiogram 1016. 

By Radiogram 1638 UCKERKARK is advised to cross the latitude of St. 
Paul's Rock at a distance of 350 miles east of the rock, then to sail to 
quadrant GD by following a southerly course and not to cross longitude 
20° W in an easterly direction between the equator and 05° S. , 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo is informed by Telegram 1545 about the vessel 
which the HOHENFRIEDBERG will use as camouflage, and about the reference 
points for the latter and the ROSSBACH. 

The Chief, Communications Division, Naval Staff agrees to have the 
Japanese learn the contents of Naval Communications Instructions II 
(NV II). The Naval Attache at Tokyo is informed to this effect by 
Telegram 1930. 

All ships in foreign waters are instructed about the regulations govern- 
ing radio communication between ship "10" and "Kirschbluete" by Radio- 
gram 1442. 

Information about the relations between Germany and Argentina, also 
about the resignation of the Japanese Foreign Minister by Radiogram 
0459. 

Radiogram 2041 informs ships in foreign waters that a German submarine 
sank the British steamer LACONIA in quadrant FF 77; German surface 
vessels are not going to the rescue of Italian prisoners of war which 
were on the ship. 

Enemy situation report by Radiograms 0954 and 1900. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 



-151- B-1052 



:::T:r^:~L^i 

13 Se-p. 1042 

2. :. r Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

thing to report. 

Channel Coast : 

2 nines were swept on route "Herz". 

:.ir.elaying operation "Wandler" was executed according to plan during 
the night of 12 Sep. At 0230 a small vessel was sunk by Army artillery 
fire north of Bayeux; 3 British crev. members were picked up, who claim 
to have been sent out in a boat with 11 men from a vessel lying 3 km 
offshore to take prisoners. A second boat was to follow then upon a 
light signal which they were to give after reaching shore. A British 
naval officer is cr.ong the prisoners. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

6 mines were swept on the convoy route between Heligoland and 
Ameland. Otherwise nothing to report. 

2. Norway : * 

The harbor of Fetsamo was shelled by a Russiar. battery on the 
Hybachl Peninsula during the night of 10 Sep.; no damage was caused. 

A moored mine was observed in the Utsire waters; the area was there- 
upon closed to shipping. Enemy air activity v/as reported fror. Petsamo 
on 10 Sep. and from the area of Stavanger and Kristiansand South on 
12 Sep. 

Convoys in the area of the Commanding Adr.irai, Norway proceeded without 
incident . 

The Commanding Admiral 4 Cruisers asked the Commanding admiral, Norway 
to widen at once by 100 m net enclosures 1 and 2 in Bogen Bay. because 
ships get too close to the nets as experienced during the west storm 
of 27 Aug. and are thus endangered. The Commanding Admiral, Norway 
calls attention to the order of the Naval Staff, Quart ermaster Division 
according to which the distance between ship and net should not exceed 
75 m, and requests a decision. 

The matter will be handled by the Naval Staff, Quartermaster Division. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 
Operation against M 16: 

'oy, which was shadowed by- -submarine -^-"400", pruceedec 

-152- 

:- : : 5 2 



") 



CONFIDENTIAL 
13 Sep. 1942 

on an easterly course toward the center o'f the passage between Dear 
Island and Spitsbergen. Its last reported position was given by sub- 
marine U "405" at 1755 as quadrant AB 3416. The first in the series 
of successes was achieved by submarine U "408" which sank a 7,000 GRT 
steamer in quadrant AB 6569 at 0952. At 0954 another steamer of the 
same size was sunk in quadrant AB 2566 by submarine U "589", which also 
fired a two-fan at the escorting aircraft carrier; she believes that 
she may have scored 1 hit. However, according to an /.ir Force report 
of 1310 the carrier was not damaged. At 1137 submarine U "457" also 
established contact with the enemy. Submarines U "592" and U "255" 
sailed from Harstadt and Kirkenes, respectively, to participate in the 
operation. 

Beginning at 1600, the Air Commander, Lofoten Islands launched an 
attack on convoy PQ 18 with 28 He 111 torpedo planes, 20 Ju 88 's and 
8 He 115 torpedo planes. The Air Commander, North dispatched an 
additional 18 torpedo planes and 17 bombers. The Air Force reported 
as definitely sunk today 9 merchant vessels totalling 61,000 GRT, as 
probably sunk 1 tanker and 5 merchant vessels with 48,000 GRT, as 
damaged 10 or 12 steamers with a total 90,000 GRT, conceding the 
possibility of duplications. 

Group North reports the following plan for operations of the surface 
forces against convoy 0J? 14, since the SCIIEER is not participating: 

(1) Alternative A: As soon as reconnaissance results are avails- 
able, the HIPPER will set out with 4 destroyers. Prior to this 2 
destroyers will transfer to Kirkenes from where they will sail immedi- 
ately after receipt of word that QP 14 has been sighted; their task is 
to maintain contact for the HIPPER force. Code word of operation is 
"Meisenbalz I". 

(2) Alternative B: If QP 14 is not sighted, the HIPPER with her 
escort of 4 destroyers will proceed in the direction of Matochkin 
Strait. She will comb the presumed route of the convoy as far as 
latitude Kostin Strait and return, depending on the situation, either 
to Kirkenes or Alta Fjord. Code name of operation is "T.Ieisenbalz II". 

(3) Both alternative A and B depend on the location of the S CHEER 
force and on whether the HIPPER force can leave the inter-island 
waters undetected. Operation A or B must start on the evening of 13 
Sep. at the latest. 

(4) In the event that neither of these alternatives should ma- 
terialize for the above reasons, the HIPPER with an escort of 3 or 4 
destroyers will carry out a mine-laying mission at the northwestern 
tip of Novaya Zemlya after the approach of PQ 18. At the same time 
the SCHEER will be withdrawn to Trondheim v/ith 2 destroyers to which 

2 torpedo boats will be added at Narvik. In case of favorable weather^ 
the SCIIEER will proceed directly to Germany. 

At 1430 Group North was instructed by telephone that the commitment of 
the surface forces is subject to the approval of the Naval Staff. 

At 1700 Group North telephoned for approval of operation "L'eisenbalz 
II". The Group plans to keep the sailing -route of the RIPPER and her 
4 destroyers far enough from the northern Russian coast to minimize as 
much as possible the threat from the reinforced British Air Force. In 
the Naval Staff's opinion the operation may either result In complete 
failure due to the lack of reliable information or, if the convoy has 
actually sailed undetected, lead to its being annihilated or damaged, 



-153- B-1052 



idlutial 



13 Sep. 1942 



as it is believed to be onl^ weakly prote 

I ie Chief, Kaval 5t : .ailed : vc-r the tel« In tl :on 

':;.• the Puehrer, who once phaalzed : .-- value :: t Lps in Hor- 

the necessity of avoiding losses vithout ret rn« I 

Chief, baff bellei af r:::e;: Cor the 

planned apei re :r.all l.-.: " - can t tot as sin 

responsibility of risking losses fr 1 nesj for 

this reas~r. he decides against the 1. -est. lee Is Ion 

- . : _. oder In Zhief, - t is tra.-.r- i:ted to Sroup Perth at 1 IS by 
telephone after the Ccrr. idmiral, Src reported t 

admiral , arctic 3 :eer. llrected to refrain fror. dispatching the 

E iestrcpers to Kirher.es as orderei earlier t; 3-r : -~ Perth ir. - na- 

tion for operation ^ieisenbalz II". 

at 1914, 3r:-r Perth advised the admiral, Arctic Ocean and the 5th Air 
Prrce, with copies to the Kaval Staff and the Corz-.a; admiral, lor- 

ap, that permission :":r operation n P.ei sere alt' not been gr 

and that their activities are to :e confined to attaehs on daraped 
shirs if the epportunity presents itself. The stand-by order for the 
Air Perce is thereby cancelled. 

The HIPPER, the Bth Destroyer Flotilla and the 1?~Z~.: are on 3 hour 
readiness. 

I-roup Perth relieve; th \: i: Id :e desirarle t: have a submarine 

equipped as fuel tanker for submarine operations in the Arctic Ccean 
ana requests the assignment of n 7B 2" as soon as it is ready for op- 
erations, or cf another similar s le vessel. The 3reup relieves 
that such a submarine would be particularly desirable for the period 
when the operatiens area in the Arctic Ccean and the Kara Sea is in- 
creased through the receding ice. 



rine "arfare 



_.::ervv Situ tier. 



1 recommit activity In t rth Atlantic. 

■nmeroua subrjarire sighting mc s "..'ere Intercepted from the vestern 

Atlantic; 4 subnarines v.ere reported on the r>crthem route, 1 off the 
Ian coast, E jff the U.S. cc ir. the TtfrkVcean. In the 



-»»- 






IV. Shag-rra> t Baltic Sea i_r.tra.-. ; es , Baltic Sea 

ng to report from the area ef the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea. 

■aval Station, Baltic ordered the suspension of shipping on rcutes 
"35 n and n 37 n for the tine being and released instructions regard! 
new routes "40a " and "43". For details see lelegran C145. 

Klnelaying and r.iresweeping activities i.. the area of the rcrrtander, 
Minesweepers, Baltic Sea suffered from bad weather. Convoy service 
:eeded according to plan. 



1 



1 



conriDL.:;TiAil 

13 Sep. 1942 

latter area a submarine attack was reported. 

2. Own Situation : 

Concerning operations against convoy PQ 18 see Own Situation, 
Arctic Ocean. 

Further successes were achieved against the westbound convoy in the 
North Atlantic (quadrants 3C 62, 63, etc.) by Group "Vorwaerts". Sub- 
marine U tt 594 H sank the steaner STONESTREET (6,131 GIT), submarine U 
"92" scored 3 hits on 3 steamers totalling 17,000 GRT, bat was unable 
to observe their sinking on account of strong counteraction. The 
success of the group's operation against this convoy has thus reached 
97,000 GUT. 

This must be appreciated all the more as it was achieved 
without any loss among our submarines and partly by in- 
experienced crews on their first operation. 

Group "Loss", which is deployed in a patrol line from quadrant A J C631 
to A J 9796 and has been reinforced to 12 submarines, was ordered to 
attack a convoy of more than 20 steamers on a northeasterly course 
which was located by submarine U "216" in quadrant AK 64. Details have 
not yet been reported. 

Nothing was heard about successes off the American coast. 

In the West Indies, submarine U "515" sank the tanker STANVAC MELBOURNE 
(10.444 GRT) in quadrant ED 9992 and the steamer WOENSDRECKT (4,668 
GRT). Submarine U "512" sank tanker PATRICK J. HURLEY (10,600 GRT) by 
gunfire, following a futile torpedo attack. The submarine suspects 
that the tanker was protected by anti-torpedo nets. 

Submarine U "558" sank a tanker of 7,000 GRT and another of 8,000 GRT 
out of a convoy in quadrant ED 8378, and torpedoed with 2 hits each a 
steamer of 5,000 GRT and a tanker of 7,000 GRT. 

No successes were reported from the Mediterranean. 

In the South Atlantic, steamer TR3VILLEY (5,300 GRT) was sunk on 12 
Sep. in quadrant FF 8588 by submarine U "68". 

More news in supplement to submarine situation, War Diary, Part D, Vol. 
IV« 

On 12 Sep. submarine U "156" of Group "Eisbaer" sank the 3ritish troop 
transport LAC01IIA at 040 52' S, 11° 28' W, which is 8' within the per- 
missible area of attack. Following the sinking it was learned that the 
steamer had 1,500 Italian war prisoners on board; 200 of them were 
picked up by submarine U "156", while many hundreds more were in life- 
boats and rafts. The Commanding Admiral, Submarines ordered all sub- 
marines in the vicinity to go to the scene. The Italian submarine 
CAPELLIITI was also directed there. 

The first concern of the Naval Staff was to relieve the submarines of 
Group "Eisbaer" from participation in the rescue work so that they 
might continue to the South Atlantic; at the same time a way to save 
the survivors had to be found. This could have been done either by 
bringing them to the French Ivory Coast port of Dlngerville on board 
our submarines, or, as suggested by the captain of submarine U "156", 
by proposing to the British via the international steamer frequency 



-155- B-1052 



ccy7zzl::.zxl 

13 Sep. 19 42 

that the scene of the sinking be declared a neutral area. In this 
event v;e would promise not to attach any of the ships dispatched to the 
rescue if the sane assurance were received for ou- submarines. 

The Chief of Staff, Naval Staff rrucr^ i Irst alternative and the 

Commanding Admiral, Submarine a was therefore instructed as follows: 
"All s _lr.es are to head for 5 '.:. ~erville . It should be attempted 
to transfer survivors to French vessels at sea. If this proves Im- 
possible, disembark at Bingerville." Simultaneously, Vichy was re- 
quested through the Foreign Office to dispatch vessels from Bi.nger- 
ville directly to the scene to meet our submarines. 

The question o^ neutralizing the scene of the sinking \/as submitted 
for examination to the Foreign Office to the Kaval Representative 
on the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff. Before the Foreign 
Office was able to comment on the matter, the Naval Aide of the 
Fuehrer communicated the latter' s decision: 

(1) The- re can be no question of notifying the British. 

(P) £ rir.e U "156" should simply have -/merged and left. 

(3) The continuati operation "Eisbaer" is the first con- 
3 i deration. 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines was therefore advised as follows: 

(1) The French have been requested to dispatch vessels from 
Bingerville and to prepare for possible arrival of German submarines. 

So far no reply has been received. 

(2) Operation "Disbaer" is not to be held up by rescue work, 
therefore only such boats are to participate which ! slong to 
that group. Should submarines of group "Lisbaer" aire e engaged, 
they are to be relieved as soon as possible. Hartenstein should ex- 
plain about his supply and fresh water situation so that if possible 
the submarine can take -art in operation "Eisbaer". 

(3) The neutralization of the scene of sinking or an agreement 
bh the British cannot be considered. 

At 1920 the Foreign Office transmitted an affirmative reply, according 
to which fast vessels and planes are being dispatched at once from 
Dakar and Bingerville. 

The II aval Staff notifies the Commanding Admiral, Submarines of this 
reply and requests to be kept constantly informed about the positions 
of the submarines. 

For the information of the French, the German Armistice Commission Is 
instructed by the llaval Staff as follows : 

(1) The submarines were ordered to head for point 1° 57' S, 11° 
22' H in quadrant 77 4406 where they are to be met by French vessels 
for the transfer of survivors. 

(2) Suggested identification signals for German submarines and 

French vessels: 

a. Star shells: for calls 1 red and 1 green star, for re- 
plies 2 green stars. 



-156- 



-> 



"> 



CONFIDUITIAL 
13 Sep. 1942 

b. Letters for light signals or Morse lanp: for calls GU, 
for replies DB. 

(3) The Commanding Admiral, Submarines urgently requests thct no 
planes be dispatched, because submarines roust fear approaching planes 
and would have to submerge at once. 

A communication from the Commanding Admiral, Submarines to the German 
Armistice Commission reveals that submarine U "156" is headed for 01 
57' S, 11° 21' V7, where she will transfer survivors probably on 14 and 
15 Sep. to 2 type IX submarines and the Italian submarine GAFELLINIj 
these in turn will put into Bingerville. 

Tor the Naval Staff's notification of the German Naval Command, Italy 
see Telegram 1917. 

The following final report is transmitted to Fuehrer Headquarters and 
the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff: 

♦ 

(1) The submarines were instructed that operation "Eisbaer" is 
not to be delayed by rescue operations. Submarines of group ''Eisbaer** 
which do not carry survivors continue on their course to the South 
Atlantic, those with survivors on board are to transfer them as quick- 
ly as possible. The submarines have distributed the survivors as 
directed, so as to be able to submerge. 

(2) The French were requested by way or the Foreign Office to 
dispatch vessels from Bingerville to the scene of the sinking. The 
French promised to send fast vessels immediately, possibly also a 
warship. The German Armistice vCommls si on and the Commanding Admiral, 
Submarines are in touch with each other with regard to further rescue 
measures . 



VI. Aerial VJarfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Incursions : 

About IPO enemy planes penetrated into northwestern Germany 
during the night of 13 Sep. Attacks concentrated on Bremen where very 
heavy damage was caused. For details see daily situation report. 

A few planes flew also into Rumania from the east anc 1 dropped bombs on 
Bucharest . 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 
Nothing to report.' 

4. Eastern Front : 

Reconnaissance activity over the Black Sea and Caspian Sea. 
Regarding operations against convoy PQ, 18 see Own Situation, Arctic 
Ocean. 



-157- 8-1052 



13 Sep. 1942 



CONFIDENTIAL 



VII. Warfare In the Mediterranean and the Dlack Sea 

1. Eneny Situation, Mediterranean : 

According to an Italian report, a convoy from the British 
Isles Is expected at Gibraltar during the next few days. 

Submarines were sighted in the forenoon off La Spezia, off Ragusa, south 
of Cape Krio (Crete) and east of Tobruk. 

German planes in the eastern Mediterranean sighted 2 steaners and 4 
escort vessels on an easterly course north of Alexandria, and 6 light 
ships 15 miles northeast of Alexandria, proceeding at full speed on a 
westerly course. 

Radio monitoring revealed lively submarine activity in the eastern 
Mediterranean. In addition, reports of British planes were intercepted 
at noon about a westbound convoy of 1 steamer and 1 destroyer and also 
about 2 northeast-bound destroyers escorted by a plane off the west 
coast of Crete. 

• 2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

Heavy air attacks on anti-aircraft and searchlight batteries 
of Tobruk began at 2045, which were still in progress at midnight. 

A naval' barge was damaged by a mine in the harbor while leaving Tobruk 
at noon. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Supply transports from Italy to North Africa proceeded ac- 
cording to plan, those from Greece to North Africa suffered from bad 
weather. For the same reason coastal supply traffic in North Africa 
had to be suspended. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report about the naval situation. 

Group South'reports that during the month of August 1942 9 submarines 
and 72 merchant vessels of 32,214 GRT transporting 782 men were es- 
corted In the Aegean Sea, in addition to which 51 merchant vessels of 
7,132 GRT proceeded unescorted. Auxiliary sailing vessels of 6,900 
GRT transported 470 men. 

The above-mentioned traffic suffered 3 enemy air attacks. Enemy sub- 
marines caused the loss of steamers WARTFELS and CAMPERIO and of 4 
auxiliary sailing vessels. Italian traffic through the area is not 
included in above compilation. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Radio monitoring revealed that up. to 0600 1 cruiser, 1 
flotilla leader and 1 destroyer were at sea in the southeastern portioiji. 
In the same area 5 destroyers, 2 large ships and 2 submarine tenders 
were located in the evening; also 7 submarines at sea at unidentified 
po sitions. 







I 



-158- 



B-1052 



1 



") 



CONFIDENT IAI) 
13 Sep. 1942 

Own Situation : 

Due to the weather situation, the scheduled PT boat opera- 
tion off Novorossisk had to be cancelled. Mine-sweeping proceeded ac- 
cording to plan. 3 Italian submarines sailed from Constanta for 
Sulina on their way east. The 2 remaining Italian submarines trans- 
ferred to Burgas for operations at the entrance of the Bosporus. Only 
3 of the Italian subchasers and 2 ships of the 1st PT Boat Flotilla 
are ready for operations. 3 naval barges were newly commissioned. Con-y 
voy and transport services proceeded according to plan. It is belated-* 
ly reported that on 11 Sep. 1 barge loaded with steel girders and 1 
motor boat sank and one barge ran aground off Dolyanskaya, all of which 
were in tow. 

During the month of August, 15 warships were escorted in the Black Sea, 
in addition to 114 merchant vessels totalling 91,061 GRT; besides, 194 
unescorted merchant vessels of 7,570 GRT, which carried 760 men 
in addition to other cargo. Enemy air attacks on convoys occurred 
every day. An enemy submarine sank 1 barge; 1 tugboat, 1 naval barge 
and 1 Siebel ferry were sunk by mines. A total of 41 mines was swept. 

Special Item s : 

1. Regarding Group South' s proposal to replace naval barges tempor- 
arily by Siebel ferries for operation "Bluecher", the Armed Forces 
High Command, Operations Staff states that utmost importance is placed 
on terminating this operation; that therefore no naval barges should 
be withdrawn, if possible, and necessary repairs should be postponed 
till after the operation is concluded. The Armed Forces High Command 
counts on additional I naval barges becoming available continuously. 

This decision is transmitted to Group South by Telegram 1918. 

2. In connection with its proposal to attack the Russian Black Sea 
fleet with planes, Group South reports that according to a communica- 
tion from Army Group A, the Air Force will primarily be assigned to 
support Army operations for the duration of the favorable season; Army 
Group A therefore considers that the time to concentrate on the Russian 
fleet will come only when weather conditions deteriorate. Group South 
suggests informing the Armed Forces High Command of the above. (See 
Telegram 1945. ) 

The Naval Representative on the Armed Forces High Command, Operations 
Staff is notified. 



VTII. Situation East Asia 

The U.S. Navy Department announces continued Japanese efforts to 
oust U.S. forces from Guadalcanal^nd Tulagi. More Japanese reinforce- 
ments have been put ashore. 

Allied Headquarters reports the sinking of a Japanese destroyer off the 
Norman by Island by a direct bomb hit. According to press reports from 
Mac Arthur's headquarters, the situation of Port Moresby has taken a 
grave turn for the worse because the Japanese have passed the highest 
elevation on their advance from Buna toward Port Moresby. 



-159- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDEm AL 
i 

13 Sep. 19 42 

IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

Chmaidia, west of Llozdok, was taken after bitter fighting. 
Also Nizhni Kurp fell into our hands after a hard struggle. Strong 
enemy air attacks were ncde on the spearheads of our attacking forces. 

Army Group B t 

At Stalingrad our forces south of the railroad broke through 
enemy lines and penetrated deeper into the suburbs. North of Stalin- 
grad v/e succeeded in taking the Tartar I.'oat by assault and in captur- 
ing a city block and barracks to the west of it. Pressure on the 
strip between the Volga River and the railroad was weaker today. 

Central Army Group : 

Several enemy attacks west of Zubtsov were repulsed. Another 
attack north of Rzhev also failed. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Repeated enemy attacks on our positions south of Lake Ladoga 
were repulsed, the enemy suffering heavy losses. 

2. Finnish Front : 

At the southeastern front sector the enemy attacked an ad- 
vanced fortified post with tanks and armored train; he was thrown back 
after a temporary penetration. At the I'urnansk sector, 2 Russian in- 
fantry companies landed on the south shore of I'otovsky Bay and with- 
drew after destroying 2 strongpoints. According to prisoners, an 
offensive from the Rybachi Peninsula is planned around 15 Sep. in order 
to establish connection with the Litsa front. 

3. North Africa: 

No situation report has been received. 



( 



-160- B-10S2 



-> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Australia ; 

The Prime Minister urged, in a statement about the war situation, that 
Australia's Army should be sufficiently strong to send reinforcements 
to the Middle East if necessary in addition to being able to defend 
herself. Australia cannot expect the Allies to supply shipping, since 
they need all transport vessels for other purposes. 

Chile ; 

According to the Transocean Nev/s Agency, the Chilean Senate voted to 
support the President's policy of non-belligerence. Communists and 
Socialists refrained from introducing a resolution calling for a break 
in relations with the Axis Powers. 

Turkey ; 

British circles in Ankara are responsible for the rumor according to 
which Willkie offered Turkey equipment for 6 motorized divisions and 
financial assistance under the Lend-Lease Law, in return for which 
Turkey is to remain neutral. In addition, Willkie is said to have 
proposed that Turkey take over the Russian Black Sea fleet and thus 
strengthen her own naval defenses if and when the opportunity arises. 
Turkish political circles offer a completely different version about 
Willkie' s mission by contending that his visit was merely the outcome 
of Turkey's request for clarification about her inclusion in the list 
of beneficiaries of the Lend-Lease Law, a measure taken by the U.S.A. 
without Turkey's knowledge. Willkie arrived at Bagdad on 12 Sep. and 
was received by the Regent on 13 Sep., to whom he allegedly handed a 
letter from President Roosevelt containing the offer of a personal 
guaranty of Iraq's post-war independence, if Iraq would actively take 
part in the war on the side of the Allies, The Prime Minister is said 
to have reiterated the assurance that Iraq would enter the war on the 
Allied side if the war should approach the Near East from the Caucasus. 



Special Item ; 

The Permanent Representative of the Commander in Chief, Navy at the 
Fuehrer Headquarters communicated on 5 Sep. that the Fuehrer, on the 
basis of the first report concerning the sinking of the mine ship ULM, 
had voiced his intention to issue an order to the effect that our war- 
ships should act in similar cases exactly as the British did, who 
allegedly machine-gunned the survivors who had taken to lifeboats. The 
Naval Staff was to submit proposals whether this procedure was to be 
followed in the case of warships only or also in the case of merchant 
vessels; furthermore, whether the order was to be given only to sub- 
marines or to the other naval forces, too. In keeping with the Naval 
Staff's opinion expressed during the conference on the situation with 
the Chief, Naval Staff (see War Diary of 11 Sep.), the Naval Staff 
urgently requested in a telegram to the Armed Forces High Command, 
Operations Staff that the nev/s about the ULM's sinking not be published 
and all steps considered in this connection be postponed, since in- 
formation about the machine-gunning of the survivors is insufficient 
so far, and the investigation has not been completed. On the same day 
Group North was requested to clarify a number of points which are de- 
cisive for evaluating the British behavior from the viewpoint of 



_l6l- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

international law. On 13 Sep. Group North replied that it had reached 
the conclusion after renewed questioning of the survivors that there 
is no proof of deliberate firing on survivors, but that the enemy- 
apparent ly had done nothing toward their rescue. 

Today, the Naval Staff submitted a detailed report to the Armed Forces 
High Command, Operations Staff and to the Permanent Representative of 
the Commander in Chief, Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters and suggested 
that before ordering any retaliatory measures it should be considered 
whether these would not affect ourselves more than the enemy. For 
evaluating this case it is important to keep in mind that no evidence 
has been found thus far that British authorities ever ordered the use 
of weapons against German survivors. It could therefore be taken for 
granted that, if the existence of such a German order became known, 
the enemy's propaganda would exploit it in a manner, the consequence 
of which can hardly be estimated. A detailed analysis of the problem 
is contained in War Diary, Part C, Vol. VIII. 



( 



Situation 14 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo requests an order to CHARLOTTE 
SCHLIEMANN to proceed to Medan through the Sunda Strait in order to 
pick up German seamen. 

With regard to the difficult fuel situation emphasized by the Japanese 

in connection with the stay of ship W 10 H in Japan, the Naval Attache at 

Tokyo suggests that after completion of repairs, ship w 10 n fill up 

with Diesel oil;* additional later fuel requirements should then be for* 

warded to her by Etappe Japan early in 1943 by means of a supply ship 

or a blockade runner. The Attache reports that the Japanese Navy 

feels that Germany shows no understanding for Japanese fuel difficulties, 1 

and calls attention to the fact that Japanese submarine operations are 

being curtailed due to our gas oil demands. He proposes therefore to 

have the CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN call at Balik Papan on her voyage to 

Japan, where she should take on 500 tons of Tarakan oil in order to 

test it and should also take along 200 cu. m. oil mixture so that ship 

"10 n can try it out. (See Telegram 1818.) 

Enemy situation report by Radiogram 1840. 



-162- B-1052 



-> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to an intelligence report, another landing attempt 
was scheduled for 15 Sep. in the vicinity of Bordeaux and on the 
Channel coast. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Atlantic Coast : 

Nothing to report . 

Channel Coast ; 

Patrol boat "1807" struck a mine and sank off Ostend. Mine- 
laying operation "Burgstaken" was carried out according to plan. Tor- 
pedo operations of the 2nd, 4th, and 6th PT Boat Flotillas are 
scheduled for the night of 14 Sep. 

Special Items : 

a. Group West reports its intention to lay a cutter float 
barrage and 2 minefields in the area north of Barfleur. The mine- 
fields are to be known as "R VI n , "Fritz VIII" and "Fritz IX". Code 
names: "Weichsel", "Oder", and "Elbe". 

b. In connection with the defense of the Scheldt estuary the 
Commander in Chief, Armed Forces, West asked for confirmation that 24 
naval barges now at Antwerp, 3 or 4 naval barges at Breskens, 6 vessel^ 
of the Rhine Flotilla at Flushing, 2 fishing steamers, 8 large 
drifters and 16 trawlers belonging to the 32nd Minesweeper Flotilla 
would be at his disposal in the event of any fighting at the Scheldt 
estuary. 

Following consultation with Group North, the Naval Staff informed the 
Commanding General, Armed Forces, West that the ,712th Division is 
directly in touch with the Commander, Amphibious Forces regarding the 
use of the naval barges. At the present time 16 naval barges are 
available at Antwerp, 5 more are temporarily out of commission. 3 na- 
val barges are ready for operations at Breskens. The vessels of the 
Rhine Flotilla as well as the 32nd Minesweeper Flotilla have assign- 
ments of their own in case of action. Any unassigned vessels in the 
harbor ready for operations are at the Army's disposal. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Lively reconnaissance activity in the direction of the Nord 
Fjord, Jutland and the southern part of the North Sea. Radio monitor- 
ing intercepted a report by a British plane about ah attack on a sub- 
marine 140 miles west of Stadland. 



B-1052 

-165- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

Own Situation : 

It is reported belatedly that nine -exploding vessels swept 
4 ground mines on 13 Sep. 3 more ground mines were swept on 14 Sep. 
by the 13th and 21st Minesweeper Flotillas. 

Convoy and patrol services proceeded according to plan. 

A single enemy plane dropped 4 demolition bombs on Wilhelmshaven at 
0627; 3 buildings were damaged. 3 demolition bombs were dropped at 
Groden near Cuxhaven. 

At 2315 a heavy enemy air raid on Cuxhaven began, which was still in 
progress at midnight. 

2. Norway ; 

Enemy air activity is reported at the northern coast in the 
Bodoe area and at the west coast in the areas of Haugesund and 
Stavanger on 13 Sep. and in the Kristiansand South area on 14 Sep. 

A 4-row net barrage was laid in Skjomen Fjord according to plan. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway reports his intention to lay the 
Malangen Fjord minefield at once, because the delivery date of cutter 
floats for water depths of 100 m to 500 m is still absolutely in- 
definite according to information from the Mining and Barrage In- 
spectorate. The Mine-Laying Experimental Command did not receive the 
order from the Naval High Command to develop the cutter floats until 
12 Sep. 

Transport and convoy services in the area of the Commanding Admiral, 
Norway proceeded according to plan. 

3. Arctic Ocean: 

Enemy Situation : 

The official Russian News Agency reports the sinking of a 
submarine by Russian ships in the Barents Sea on 12 Sep. 

Rad 4 n monitoring revealed that not more than 2 British ships were 
present in the Archangel area. Betv/een 2 and 5 Russian submarines 
were located at sea. Reports about German submarines were intercepted 
from 45 miles west and 84 miles south of the South Cape; these nessages 
were broadcast by the Commander in Chief of the Russian Arctic Ocean 
fleet. 

Own Situation : 

After careful examination of the available information, the 
Air Commander, Lofoten Islands reports the number of merchant vessels 
composing convoy PQ le as 45 at 0855 of 13 Sep. and as 43 after 1000. 
Between these hours 2 ships were sunk by German submarines. (See War 
Diary of 13 Sep.) 

Our submarines established contact with PQ 18. At 2330 of 13 Sep. sub- 
marine U "457" observed the convoy assembling west of South Cape 
escorted by an aircraft carrier. Submarine U w 403" was damaged by 
aerial mines and depth charges and is now operating against stragglers. 



.1^4- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

The submarines were driven from the convoy in the course of the day by 
strong air and destroyer escorts and had to keep at a safe distance 
also on account of the continuous attacks by German air forces. Our 
offensive operations therefore met with difficulties. Submarine 
U "457" sank a 6,000 GRT tanker and a 4,000 GRT steamer at 0400 and be- 
lieves to have scored 2 hits on a destroyer. In the afternoon sub- 
marine. U "377" reported a subchaser disguised as a merchant vessel. 
A submarine which sailed from Bergen is headed for quadrant AD 26 and 
has orders to look for daraged vessels on the convoy route. 

The Air Commander, Lofoten Islands dispatched 36 torpedo planes and 18 
bombers against convoy PQ 18 after 1530. The 5th Air Force reports 
today's result as 6 steamers and 1 tanker with a total of 49,000 GRT 
sunk, as well as 1 destroyer. In addition, 3 steamers of 21,000 GRT 
were damaged and a destroyer probably damaged. The aircraft carrier 
may have been hit by 3 aerial torpedoes; columns of water were ob- 
served. However, no confirmation of any damage has been received as 
yet. The convoy was last sighted at 1900 on a southerly course and 
consisted at that time of 28 merchant vessels. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

.4 bombs each were dropped on Kiel and Luebeck early this morning. 
A smoke screen was laid at 0635 for half an hour around the Kiel ship- 
yards. 

Convoy and patrol activity in the area of the Commanding Admiral, De- 
fenses, Baltic Sea proceeded according to plan. 

Bad weather continued to hamper minelaying operations of the Commander, 
Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea in the eastern part of the Baltic Sea. 
Steamer FINLAND, carrying 1,000 men on leave, was damaged off Utoe by 
an enemy submarine. The ship is being towed to port. Casualties are 
2 dead and 25 wounded. 

Convoy and transport services proceeded otherwise according to plan. 

Finnish authorities suspended all sailings from Bothnian Gulf ports 
until convoy service between Kasfeo and Mantyluoto has been established i 



V. Merchant Shipping 

Spanish ore shipments to Great Britain rose again during July 1942. 
The monthly average for the January-June period amounts to approximately 
62,000 tons of iron ore and 15,000 tons of pyrite. The corresponding 
figures for July are about 69,000 and 34,000 tons. 

An extensive report on the Spanish law of 21 Aug. tightening govern- 
ment control of sales of Spanish merchant tonnage is among other sub- 
jects contained in short report No. 30/42 of the Naval Staff Intelli- 
gence Division, Foreign Merchant Marine Branch. The text of the law 
is also included. 

According to Radio Daventry, the Canadian Navy Minister announced that 
10,000 ships loaded with ammunition and other supplies have crossed the 
Atlantic from Canada to-"fche- British I sl-es— aln ce th e w ar began. 



-165- 



B-1052 



::::r:"z:;r:i 



14 Se-. 1942 



According to U.S. federal shipping authorities the 10 U.S. "Liberty" 
shipyards delivered 56 Liberty ships of 10,000 tons each during 
August. These vessels were built on the average in 82.89 days per ship 
from keel laying to commissioning. 



VI. Submarine V.arfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report, except the usual subnarine sightings. 

2. Own Situation : 

See Own Situation, Arctic Ocean regarding operations against 
convoy PQ 18. 

The operation against the outbound convoy in the llorth Atlantic by 
Group "Vorwaerts" was called off because chances of attack became very 
slight on account of decreasing visibility. As a further success it is 
reported that subnarine U "91" torpedoed a 2-stack destroyer which 
burst in flames; it was observed beyond doubt that another destroyer 
pulling up alongisde her was sunk. 

This ends the list of achievements of this remarkable 
operation. 

No reports were received from Group "Loss". 

Our submarines were unable to establish contact with the incoming 
convoy in quadrant AK 62. Group "Pfeil" has orders to terminate this 
operation if the situation should not change before nightfall and to 
proceed to quadrant AL 92. 

No successes were reported from the American coast. 

Submarine U "515" reports another success by sinking steamer OCEiJJ 
GUARD (8,000 GHT ) and a 3,500 GET steamer in quadrant EE 6770. 

Submarine U "66" of the South Atlantic group sank the unescorted blacked- 
out steamer BREDA (6,800 C-RT) in quadrant FF 8587. 

For additional news see Supplement to Submarine Situation in War Diary, 
Part B, Vol. IV. 

Concerning operations for the rescue of the LACOiriA survivors : 

The Commanding Adniral, Submarines is advised by telephone that there 
is a possibility of French warships (destroyer flotilla leaders) being 
assigned to this task. 



The Commanding Admiral, Submarines suggests that it would 
direct the French to proceed to the scene of the sinking 
same time also to the rendezvous point designated for the 
survivors. Since, however, according to latest reports, 
of the survivors is crowded into lifeboats, submarine U " 
lng on the scene for 2 other submarines to arrive. The C 
miral, Submarines therefore requests that the French ship 
directly to the scene of the sinking and not to the rende 



be useful to 
and at the 

delivery of 
the ma lority 
156" is wait- 
ommanding Ad- 
s be sent 
zvous point 



-166- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



14 Sep. 1942 



designated previously. At 1020 the German Armistice Commission re- 
ports that the French were instructed accordingly. At 1530 it sub- 
mits a report about the conferences with the French delegation, in the 
course of which the French were advised that everything depends on the 
French .ships arriving in time. Therefore the French were requested 
to report soon which ships were sent and when they can be expected to 
arrive. (See Telegram 1530.) 

The French replied that a GLOIRE class cruiser is being ordered to 
sail from Dakar and proceed at top speed to the scene of the accident, 
because the avisos DUMONT D'URVILLE and A MIAMI TE which are 1,000 miles 
from there could not arrive there until the night of 16 Sep. at the 
earliest. At 1045 the order of the naval commander at Dakar to 
DUMONT D'URVILLE was intercepted by radio monitoring, directing her to 
proceed at top speed to 01° 5V S, 11° 22' W, where she will meet 3 
German and Italian submarines loaded with survivors. 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines requests the German Armistice 
Commission (with copy to the Naval Staff) to instruct the French to 
approach the sinking scene by daylight only, to release recognition 
signals as early as possible, and also to flash searchlight signals, 
to hoist the national flag on the top mast when nearing the scene, and 
to flash the suggested radio signal over the 600 m wavelength one hour 
before reaching the spot. The French warships should expect that the 
submarines may be submerged at the time of their arrival at the rendez- 
vous point. 

Y/ith these measures everything possible has probably been 
done to rescue the surviving Italians. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 
Nothing to report. 

2. Incursions : 

During the night of 14 Sep. 100 enemy planes penetrated into 
northwestern Germany from the west. They concentrated their attacks 0$ 
Wilhelmshaven. 1 attacker was shot down by anti-aircraft, 2 by naval 
anti-aircraft, and 1 by fighter planes. Preliminary reports indicate 
considerable damage. For details see daily situation report, where a 
belated report concerning the attack on Bremen in the night of 13 Sep. 
will also be found. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

10 enemy planes were shot down at Tobruk during the night of 
13 Sep. In the course of the day German air forces scored 9 direct 
hits with 250 kg bombs on a cruiser which was left burning, and 1 dir- 
ect hit each on 2 destroyers; these ships were part of the enemy 
force which had attacked Tobruk. In addition a PT boat loaded with 
troops was sunk. 

4. Eastern Front : 

79 enemy planes were shot down at the various Army sectors. 



-167- 



B-1052 



coirpiDLirriAL 

14 Sep. 1942 

Regarding the operation against convoy PQ 16 and its results see Own 
Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

Reconnaissance activity in the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. 

1 steamer was sunk and 2 others damaged on 13 Sep. out of a convoy on 
Lake Ladoga. At Nov. Ladoga a patrol vessel was set afire. 



VIII. Warfare in the ?.'.editerranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean * 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, a large ship, 
apparently a battleship, escorted by 3 small vessels, passed the Strait 
of Gibraltar in an easterly direction at 2145 of 13 Sep. At noon of 
14 Sep. a convoy of 7 steamers, 2 of which were equipped with catapult 
and plane, arrived at Gibraltar from the Atlantic. Also cruiser 
CHARXBDIS and a loaded steamer arrived at Gibraltar from the Atlantic 
at 0700. Intensified patrol activity was observed in the Strait of 
Gibraltar in the forenoon. 

Messages from 2 British ships, possibly submarines were intercepted by 
radio monitoring in the area between Minorca and Sardinia during the 
forenoon and from other ships at sea in the Gibraltar area and east- 
ward. 

Submarines were spotted west of Argostoli and north of Benghazi. 

An enemy landing operation west and east of Tobruk was carried out and 
covered by light naval forces at 0045. After 0700 these forces were 
intercepted and attacked by German aircraft northeast of Tobruk. Re- 
ports received so far are partly contradictory; according to them the 
enemy force consisted of 1 or 2 light cruisers, 6 or destroyers, and 
a few motor gunboats which withdrew in an easterly direction after 
suffering losses. At noon another force, probably 1 cruiser and 6 
destroyers, was on an easterly course 60 miles northeast of Marsa 
liatruh. A captured operations order revealed the enemy's plans as 
follows: 

a. Landings at 3 points east and wect of Tobruk. 

b. Greatest possible destruction of harbor installations. 

c. Sinking of ships found in the harbor. 

Definitely lost were 2 destroyers, reportedly of the JERVIS class, one 
of which struck a mine while the other succumbed to German anti-aircraft 
artillery, 2 corvettes, and 1 motor gunboat which ran aground. A third 
destroyer was probably lost due to an explosion. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

The heavy air raid on Tobruk lasted until 0310. At 0045 
unidentified enemy units landed at Marsa Umm, Esc, and Sciausc. A 
counterattack was launched by an Italian unit. Around 0430 an enemy 
ship shelled Tobruk and the Derna road. At 0045 the Army was already 
in a position to report that the landing attempt had failed and that 
the naval forces had been retreating in an easterly direction since 0600, 



-168- 



B-1052 



1 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

At 0630 4 motor minesweepers started a search of the coast and captured 
the grounded British motor gunboat "314" and 130 prisoners, partly 
survivors of the sunken destroyer. Around noon the harbor situation 
at Tobruk had quieted down; no damage had been caused. At 2 points 
fighting was still in progress against encircled small enemy detach- 
ments. The Navy suffered no casualties or losses. 

This operation should probably be classified as armed 
reconnaissance and the British Admiralty termed it such* 

During the night of 13 Sep. Benghazi was also attacked from the air. 
It is suspected that aerial mines were laid. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

Proceeded according to plan. Coastal shipping was resumed 
after the weather improved. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report.. i 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance spotted 3 steamers on a northwesterly 
course off Tuapse during the forenoon. As revealed by radio monitoring, 
cruisers KRASNY KRIM and KRASNY KAVKAS, several submarines, and de- 
stroyers were at sea in the southeastern Black Sea. 

See Telegram 1806 for a report of the Naval Defense Command, Black Sea 
about the 1st Russian PT Boat Division, and Telegram 1811 concerning 
the Dnieper Flotilla. 

Own Situation : 

German PT boats operating southeast of Gelendzhik during the 
night of 13 Sep.. encountered no ship traffic. Minesweeping in the Sea 
of Azov and in the Cape Sarych and Kerch areas proceeded according to 
plan; the minefield. 'south of Sarych was swept and the coastal route 
from Balaklava to Yalta checked for mines without result. 

Heavy artillery fire on Novorossisk continued. The Naval Shore Com- 
mand, Caucasus reports losses of personnel. 2 small enemy ships of 
unidentified type which tried to enter Anapa during the night of 12 
Sep. were forced to withdraw. Superior bomber forces attacked Novoros*- 
sisk all day and night. Yalta, too, was attacked again on 11 Sep. 

Naval barges, Siebel ferries and landing barges ferried 21,144 men, 
9,229 horses, and 3,802 vehicles in connection with operation "Blueche^" 
up to 13 Sep. 



-169- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sop. 1942 

IX. Situation East Asia 

The U.S. radio reports that a Japanese cruiser v/as sunk and 
another one damaged by heavy bombers in the vicinity of Inline Day. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A : 

Heavy fighting in the Novorosslsk area continues. The enemy 
showed remarkable offensive activity at all sectors of the Army Group. 
However, all our positions were held. 

Army Group D : 

The battle for Stalingrad continues in the face of tough and 
stubborn enemy resistance. One of our divisions succeeded in penetrat- 
ing the city and reached the west bank of the Volga River. 

* 

Our tank units in the Don River bend northwest of Svoboda went over to 
the offensive. 

Central Army Group : 

Strong eneny movements were observed in the area south of 
Sukhinichi. In the Rzhev area the enemy renewed his attacks with con- 
siderable forces; he succeeded in penetrating into our positions in 
the Rzhev city park. North of Smolensk our forces advanced north- 
eastward against partisans . 

Northern Army Group ; 

An attack on the Volkhov sector succeeded in rolling up an 
enemy position on a front 600 m. wide. Enemy units which had penetrated 
into the lines of the light infantry division south of Lake Ladoga were 
cut off. The enemy probably has 60 to, 70 batteries SDuth of Lake 
Ladoga and 35 batteries on the Neva front. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

In the rear area west of Alakurtti an enemy detachment 
tried to blow up the railroad. 

3. North Africa : 

Heavy enemy gunfire along tho entire Egyptian front during 
the night of 13 Sep. During the day normal artillery and scouting 
activity on both sides; lively enemy air reconnaissance. 

The Dritish detachments landed at Tobruk were destroyed with small 
German losses. 300 prisoners were taken and a number of landing craft', 
weapons, and equipment captured. 

Enemy sabotage detachments were annihilated by Italian troops near 
Benghazi and Barche. A few German planes were destroyed at the Barche 
airfield. 

B-1052 

-170- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
14 Sep. 1942 

An unconfirmed report contends that the enemy also dropped parachutist)* 
in connection with his landing attempt; this is denied by the British. 

13 Italian planes were destroyed through sabotage at 2 Italian air- 
fields on Rhodes Island. During the night of 13 Sep. a German ammuni- 
tion depot in Catania caught fire. 



1 



-171- &-105 2 



COKFIDUrriAL 
15 Sep. 1942 

Iter.s of Political Importance 

In a message to Congress President Roosevelt gave an account of Lend- 
Lease activities for the past 1-|- years. For details see Political 
Review No. 216, par. 1. On this occasion the President declared that 
the continuation of the Lend-Lease program on a scale sufficient to 
ensure the victory of the Allies is dependent on a drastic curtail- 
ment in the consumption of consumer goods. The U.S.A. has hardly 
reached the half-way mark on the way to maximum war production. 

France : 

According to a new law introducing compulsory labor service, all men 
between 10 and 50 years and unmarried women between 21 and 35 years of 
ago are liable for service. 

A rumor current in foreign countries concerning an alleged landing of 
U.S. forces in French Equatorial Africa and in the Belgian Congo is 
not confirmed by authoritative Vichy circles. 

China : 

According to a Chungking report, Japan has had to relinquish most of 
the interior of Hopel Province. The open countryside is said to have 
been taken over by the nationalist guerilla forces. 

India : 

Unrest throughout the country and systematic destruction of railroad 
stations and post offices continue. 



Special Items : 

The Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff has investigated the 
possibility of damaging the enemy fleets in the North Atlantic and the 
Arctic Ocean by means of submarines to such an extent that our heavy 
surface forces can operate. 

Ke has come to the conclusion that this is impossible. The prospects 
of success are so poor that it would not pay to divert the submarines 
from operations against enemy merchant vessels, and thus forego sink- 
ing these. 

The situation would not be changed materially if a compromise solution 
were considered whereby fewer submarines would be assigned to the 
above operations; the chances of submarines against the much faster 
surface ships are after all very poor, particularly once the enemy is 
on guard. 

The analysis of the situation is contained in War Diary, Part C, under 
l/Skl I op 1508/42 Gkdos. Chefs., file "Fundamental Problems of War- 
fare". 



-172- B-105 2 



1 



CONFIDENTIAL 
15 Sep. 1942 

Situation 15 Sep. 1942 

I. War In Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation ; 

The Naval Staff congratulates ship "28 " on her latest 
successes. It is assumed from the report that traffic is routed through 
quadrant GQ. The assumption held at first, that traffic is running 
mainly on a course of 45°, is discarded on account of its improbability. 
(See Radiogram 2038.) 

Ship "28" and ship "23" are informed by Radiogram 2216 that the 2 priz£ 
crews on board the UCKERMARK are at the disposal of ship "28" either 
for prize crev/s or to replace personnel, and that stear.ers LIMA and 
BREDA, too, besides the LAC ONI A, were sunk in quadrant FF by German 
submarines. The latest crew list is to be forwarded by the TANNENFELS 

The CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMAHN is instructed to call at Medan as requested 
by the Naval Attache at Tokyo, who is informed that the vessel must 
previously be equipped at Batavia with charts and manuals for this run} 
also, that she will be able to pick up German seamen at Medan only if 
some of the war prisoners can first be removed from the overcrowded 
ship. The Naval Staff accepts the Naval Attache's proposal concern- 
ing fuel supply. This matter will be settled by the Armed Forces 
Intelligence Division, Section IV. Instructions regarding the various 
loading ports will have to be given to the SCHLIEI.IANN directly by the 
Naval Attache at Tokyo, with copies for the Naval Staff and the Armed 
Forces Intelligence Division, Section IV. (See Telegrams 1500, 2220, 
and 2335.) 

Enemy situation report* to all shins in foreign waters by Radiogram 
1503. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Radio London reported extensive invasion maneuvers over the 
weekend which took place in the London district of the Thames estuary. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

Nothing to report. 

Channel Coast : 

Torpedo missions of the PT Boat flotillas had to be in- 
terrupted because of poor visibility. 

Mine-exploding vessel "142" sank after striking a mine. 3 more mines 
were swept on route "Herz". Mine-laying operation "Weser" is scheduled 

B-1052 

-175- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
15 Sep. 1942 

for the night of 15 Sep. 

Special Items : 

a. As ordered, the report of the Naval Staff based on Group West'B 
reply to the questions from Fuehrer Headquarters concerning the seizure 
of the Casquets is submitted to the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High 
Command. For copy see l/Skl I Nord 22769/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part 
C, Vol. II b. 

b. According to a telephone message from Group North, the 
Commander, Destroyers reported that the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla will 
not be ready for operations prior to the end of October. From previous 
information it was to have been ready by the beginning of October 
following the termination of the fleet maneuvers. 

The" fleet is directed to investigate and report at what date the 5th 
Torpedo Boat Flotilla will be ready for transfer to the west area. In 
this connection the Naval Staff calls attention to its order of 1 Sep. 
concerning disposition of the light forces. (See War Diary of 1 Sep.) 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea t 

During an engagement with 6 enemy motor gunboats off Hook of 
Holland between 0435 and 0504, 1 enemy vessel was definitely sunk, 
another one probably sunk and a third one set afire by 4 of our patrol ■ 
vessels. The latter suffered slight damages and casualties. 

3 mines were swept in the area of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, 
North. 

Damage was caused to the naval shipyard by an enemy air raid on 
Vt'ilhelmshaven during the night of 14 Sep.; 6 barracks burned down, but 
production continued. 2 guns of the Tirpitz harbor anti-aircraft 
battery were put out of commission. An air defense post received a 
direct hit. For detailed reports see Telegrams 0200, 0615, 0900, 0715, 
and 2050. 

2. Norway t 

An eastbound convoy was shelled at 0045 by a Russian battery 
on Rybachi Peninsula. An Army coastal battery returned the fire. Re- 
ports of an enemy landing of undetermined strength 2 km west of Rybachi 
Peninsula caused e state of increased readiness of our forces in the 
Petsamo area. 

Destroyer STEINBRINCK arrived at Trondheim. Shipping in the Utsire 
area was resumed since no trace of the suspected mines was found. 

Enemy planes were active in the Trondheim area on 14 Sep. at noon and 
in the Stavanger area in the forenoon of 15 Sep. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway reported in detail the quantities of un* 
delivered cargo which could not be shipped on account of the very tense 
shipping situation; he urgently requested the Quartermaster Division, 
Naval Staff to call on the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff 



-17*- 



■1052 



~> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
15 Sep. 1942 

and Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping for the immediate alloca- 
tion of at least 30,000 cu. m. of shipping space for the most urgent 
naval tasks. His demands in this respect could not be satisfied by the 
Commanding General, Armed Forces, Norway due to the extremely tense 
transport situation in the Norwegian area and the constantly increasing 
tasks of the Armed Forces, the Todt Organization and the civilian 
authorities. (See Telegram 1030.) 

The matter will be taken up by the Shipping and Transport Branch, Naval 
Staff Quartermaster Division. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Operations against convoy PQ lP t 

At 0845 the convoy was reported as 27 merchant vessels, 1 air*- 
craft carrier, and the escort, on a course of 120° in quadrant AC 2545. 
At 2200 3 submarines were in contact with it and 7 more were in the 
vicinity. The" shadowers v/ere ordered to report bearings at intervals 
over different frequencies. At 1407 submarine U "403" was bombed twice 
in quadrant AC 2674 by 2 planes, probably He Ill's; all bombs missed. 
The markings were definitely recognized. The planes subsequently at- 
tacked the convoy. Submarine U "457" fired a three-fan against a 
pursuing destroyer and missed. Out of the 12 submarines operating 
against convoy PQ 18, U "88" and U "589" did not report on 14 and 15 
Sep. so that it is possible that they were lost. 

The Air Force had no particular success today either. The majority of 
the planes did not find the target due to bad weather. Direction finde^ 
equipment wes affected by strong aurora borealis and was partly not 
audible at all. The last location report after midnight counted ap- 
proximately 30 merchant vessels, 1 carrier and 18 escort vessels. 

The weather favors the enemy and saved him from suffering 
losses similar to those on 13 and 14 Sep.; it permitted 
the enemy to escape the range of our bombers without de- 
viating very far north and to gain time by staying on hi^ 
c our s e . 

At 0727 convoy QP 14 was spotted in quadrant AC 9944 and reported by 
planes as leaving via the western channel and as composed of approx- 
imately 20 steamers and between 10 and 14 warships on a general course 
of 45°. 

Submarine U "456" was ordered to establish contact. 

The TIRPITZ reports being completely ready for operations except for 
Diesel-electric engine II. 

With reference to Group North's request for allocation of a submarine 
tanker for the submarines in the Arctic Ocean (see War Diary of 13 Sep. I) 
the Commanding Admiral, Submarines reports that "UD 2" is technically 
not suited for use in this war theater. Another ship cannot be 
assigned without interfering with warfare in the Atlantic or with the 
equally important training requirements. Comparing the distances in 
the submarine operations zone in the Arctic Ocean with those in the 
Atlantic, the Commanding Admiral, Submarines is convinced that type C 
VII submarines can operate in the Arctic Ocean over longer periods of 
time without refueling than in the Atlantic. 



-175- &-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
15 Sep. 1942 

IV. Ska^.errak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Nothing to report from the Baltic Sea entrances or the western 
Baltic Sea. 

Mine-laying operation "Seeigel 34 M was carried out by 2 naval barges 
according to plan in the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic 
Sea, 

Steamer ALKAID was damaged by a mine west of Hangoe while weighing 
anchor and had to be beached. Steamer FINLAND also had to be beached 
off Lohm. 

Mine-sweeping and convoy service according to plan. 



V. Merchant Shipping : 

The Messagero published figures of a post-war shipbuilding program 
of the Italian government aimed at providing Italy quickly with a 
merchant marine of 9,000,000 GRT. Unfortunately such plans do nothing 
to alleviate the present shortage of tonnage for essential war tasks. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

In the forenoon radio messages from 2 planes v/ere intercepted 
which reported that they had not encountered convoy HX 106. Another 
plane reported a depth charge attack on a surfaced submarine approxi- 
mately 100 miles northwest of the Hebrides Is-lands at 1630. 39 planes 
of the 19th Air Group were located. The British steamer RAVENS POINT 
(1,787 GRT) reported from the Gibraltar area at 0808, without "giving her 
position, that she was listing heavily due to an underwater detonation. 

From the U.S. coast .and the West Indies we intercepted reports of 3 
submarine attacks and 4 sightings* 

2. Own Situation : 

For operations against PQ, 18 and QP 14 see Own Situation, 
Arctic Ocean. 

In the North Atlantic, Group n PfeIl w in quadrant AL 45 was directed 
against a westbound convoy of between, 11 and 15 steamers intercepted at 
1909 by a submarine of the group. Contact with the convoy was lost, 
however, after 2 hours due to fog. The group was ordered to continue 
the operation. 

4 submarines are en route toward quadrants AL 27 and AE 29 against the 
warships returning from the PQ convoy mission. 

Group "Vorwaerts" is replenishing its supplies. 

No successes were reported by the submarines operating off the American 
coast. 

-I76- 8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



15 Sep. 1942 



From the West Indies submarine U "515" reports the sinking of a British 
steamer of 6,000 GRT in quadrant EE 7776 and the Norwegian steamer 
SOERHOLT (4,801 GRT) in quadrant EO 1129. 

In the South Atlantic, submarine U "159" is taking the place of U "156" 
in Group "Eisbaer", which is scheduled to take on supplies on 22 Sep. in 
quadrant GG 1999. 

Submarines U "506", U "507" and U "156" are to arrive in quadrant FE 
9695 on 17 Sep. to transfer the survivors of the LACONIA. 

The German Armistice Commission reports that the French refuse to flash 
radio signals in view of the possibility of giving themselves away, but 
agree to the remaining suggestions of the Commanding Admiral, Submarine*. 
(See War Diary 14 Sep.). The GLOIRE left Dakar on 14 Sep. at 2130 
Central Greenwich Time and will arrive at the scene of the LACONIA sink"*- 
ing in the afternoon of 17 Sep. The dispatch vessels ANNAMITE and 
DUMONT D'URVILLE were at sea with convoys, and are likewise expected to 
arrive at the scene in the afternoon of 17 Sep. (See Telegram 1945.) 

Nothing to report from the Mediterranean. 

For additional reports see supplement to submarine situation in War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 

20 planes attacked Boston during the night of 15 Sep. 



2. 



Incursions: 



12 bombers and 24 Spitfires attacked Cherbourg during the 
afternoon. Steamer SOLMGLINT was hit below the waterline and almost 
capsized. This danger was averted by flooding opposite. compartments 
with the help of explosives. The barracks of submarine personnel were 
damaged. 2 planes were shot down. 

20 Incursions were reported In the coastal area of the German Bight - 
during the night of 15 Sep. No bombs were dropped, but mine-laying is 
suspected. 



3. 



Mediterranean Theater: 



4 enemy planes were, shot down during the fighter attacks on 
Malta. 22 of the enemy fighters which took off on account of our dive 
bomber attacks were shot down for sure and 3 probably. Enemy air 
activity in the entire North African area has decreased. Reconnaissance 
extending to longitude 40° W brought no results. 

4. Eastern Front ; 

For operations against convoy PQ 18 see Own Situation, Arctic 
Ocean. So far, the Air Force reported sinking 17 steamers totalling 
116,000 GRT, including 1 tanker. 



-177- 



B-1052 



:::~::_:t:ai 

15 Sep. 1942 

5r ecial Itggg : 

Mass British attacks were carried out recently in close formation. 
"reja riii: Instruments tc help divert the air and the fire are there- 
fore urgently needed. 

The Operations 5ta:f, Air Force requests the Naval Staff to put 20 Freya 
sets from the current deliveries to the Navy at the disposal of the Air 
Force between now and the end of 1942* (See Telegram 17*15.) 

The natter will be handled by the Chief, Communications Division, Kaval 
Staff. 



"~". ".Yarfare ir. the Mediterranean ar.d the Black Sea 

1. Ir.er.v Situation, Mediterranean : 

The ship situation at Sicraltar is unchanged and that at 
Valletta she" ed only slight changes. A search for damaged British ships 
in the liarsa Matruh-Alexandrla area was futile. 

A Serman submarine sighted a convoy of 3 steamers and 2 escort vessels 
in the eastern Mediterranean sailing on a southerly course approximately 
:: r.iles northwest of Haifa. 

At 1400 radio monitoring intercepted a report from a British plane 
about 2 destroyers and 3 planes heading east approximately 75 miles west 
of Crete. 

2. Own Situation r Mediterranean ? 

Resistance of the enemy detachment which landed at Tobruk was 
finally broken around noon of 14 Sep. The number of prisoners was 
increased to 550. A resume of the C-erman Kaval Command, Italy about the 
landing attempt at lobrux: retzrts also the sinking of an enemy destroyer 
due to a mine. Among the destroyers sunk are the S1EH and the ZULU. 
Statements concerning the enemy naval forces sighted by the Air Force 
are contradictory and a clear picture of their number and composition 
could thus far not be obtained. Tne report emphasizes the good work 
done by the Kaval Communications Officer, 3yrenaica, who was first to 
retort the landing ar.d the cr.lv ore to furnish inf crmstion on the enemy 
situation during the first hours s operation. It cannot be de- 
termined yet whether the successes reported e Air Force will be 
confirmed. For copy of reoort see l/Skl 22933/42 G-kdos. in War Diary- 
Part C, Vol. XIV. 

3. Transport of Supplies to Mcrth Africa : 
Operations proceeded according to plan. 

4. Area Maval Sroup South ; 
Aegean Sea : 

£nemy Situation : 
Mothi.-.c t o ret :rt . 



-173- 



~) 



") 



confidential 

15 Sep. 1942 

Own Situation : 

6 enemy planes attacked Suda Bay during the afternoon of 14 
Sep. No damage was reported. The Candia net barrage was damaged by 
bad weather. Convoy traffic on schedule. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

According to radio monitoring, the cruiser KRASNY KRIM was at 
sea in an undetermined position during the forenoon. 1 destroyer, 1 
submarine tender, and 2 submarines were at sea southwest of Sukhum. 

Own Situation : 

Enemy planes raided Yalta during the nights of 11 and 12 Sep. 
The searchlight on the pier was hit, 

A mine was swept on 14 Sep. by a mine-sweeping plane between Mariupol 
and Yeisk. Supply traffic is in progress between these places. Convoy 
and transport services were partially hampered by bad weather. On the 
evening of 14 Sep. 2 barges ran aground at Anapa. 

3 naval barges were newly commissioned. 2 of them passed through 
Vienna on 14 Sep. on their way to Galatz. 

Special Items : 

a. The Admiral, Black Sea is making preparations for land transports 
from the Black Sea to the Caspian Sea. (See Telegram 1630.) The 
Shipping and Transport Branch of the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division 
is requested to inform the Transport Command urgently of its transport 
requirements and to call attention to the significance of naval opera- 
tions for the Army operations. 

b. Referring to the reduction of Greek occupation costs, Group South 
forwards a communication of the Commanding General, Armed Forces, 
Southeast according to which ship repairs are not subject to regulation^ 
for curtailment of occupation costs. 



IX. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front: 



Army Group A : 

Enemy attacks at all sectors of this group continued. 



B-1052 

-179- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
15 Sep. 1942 

Army Group 3 : 

The battle for Stalingrad is progressing slowly but success- 
fully anid sandstoms. At Voronezh the enemy succeeded in penetrating 
our line by surprise. A German counterattack is under way. 

Central Army Group : 

Several enemy thrusts south of Kirov were repulsed. 2 German 
tank divisions penetrated deeply into enemy lines east and northeast of 
Sychevka. The operation is still progressing. 

In the Zubtsov area and on both Volga River banks the enemy continued 
his offensive. Y.e were able to hold our lines. Enemy concentrations 
north of Hzhev were dispersed by artillery. The fight for the city park 
of Rzhev is still going on. 

Northern Array Group : 

Southeast of Staraya Russa the enemy launched a surprise 
attack on both sides of the Redvya River; a counterattack is under way. 
All enemy attacks south of Lake Ladoga were completely repulsed. 
Attrition fire is being maintained in this area by our artillery. 

2. Finnish Front : 

Lively artillery and scouting activity on both sides. 

3. North Africa ; 

Normal enemy scouting activity and artillery fire along the 
entire front. The number of prisoners taken during the attack on 
Tobruk has increased to 580. 



B-1052 

-180- 



~) 



1 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19i|2 

Items of Political Importance 

U.S.A. : 

According to an Italian report from Ankara, President Roosevelt de- 
clared In a telegram to the Chief of the U.S. Military Mission at 
Cairo that the Middle East is at present the Allies' most important 
theater of war; the U.S.A. must therefore concentrate its attention 
there and must ship the bulk of all American supplies to this area* 

Hull informed the French Ambassador that the large-scale supply of 
French labor to Germany la considered assistance given to the enemy 
and is thus Incompatible with France's international obligations. 
Moreover, the U.S. Government condemns the large-scale expulsion and 
deportation of Jewish refugees from unoccupied France, 

Argentina : 

The Foreign Affairs Committee of Congress voted 5 to 3 for adherance 
to the resolutions of the Rio Conference and by a similar vote de- 
clined to sever relations with the Axis Powers. 

Brazil : 

The ships bought from the German and Italian Governments some time 
ago C7 German and 18 Italian vessels totalling 180,000 GRT) were 
declared national property by Government decree. The money deposited 
in accordance with the sales contracts was confiscated. 

Chi le ; 

The Chilean Foreign Minister believes that no change of the country's 
foreign policy can be expected prior to the President's return from 
Washington by the middle of November, unless untoward incidents 
should occur. The crisis, if it comes at all, will become acute 
early next year, depending on the development of the war situation. 

India : 

At the Parliament in New Delhi the British referred to the country- 
wide organized sabotage acts, particularly against strategically 
important installations, and declared that the spread of the move- 
ment is interfering with the successful prosecution of the war. 

France : 

In addition to the negotiations between the Reich Commissioner of 
Maritime Shipping and Laval concerning the transfer of 120,000 tons 
of shipping space from French Jurisdiction, the German Armistice 
Commission has resumed the conferences regarding the French plea 
for reinforcing French forces defending the African possessions. 
For details see War Diary, Part C, Vol. VIII. The conferences now 
taking place between Laval, Petain, and the leaders of the French 
Armed Forces are probably concerned with this problem. 

The opinion voiced at Vichy with regard to the shipment of American 
forces to Africa is at variance with the British report that U.S. 
troops have arrived at Brazzaville. 



-181- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19)42 

Special Items 

The Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign Merchant Marine Branch has 
taken a stand on the following question raised by the Naval Staff, 
Operations Division: "Which of these two alternatives Is the most 
effective type of warfare against merchant shipping, to sink ships 
bound for the British Isles, considering that all war materiel and 
essential commodities there must be imported, or to sink ships bound 
for America?" 

The Naval Intelligence Division makes the following statement: The 
enemy's ship construction program aims at a monthly output of 
900,000 ORT (of which 750,000 GRT constitute cargo space) by the 
beginning of I9I4.3. 

The decisive factor in answering the above question is the amount of 
shipping sunk per month. If it is possible to increase this figure 
to about 1,300,000 tons and to keep it at this level, then, no 
matter whether these ships are loaded or where they are bound, 
these sinkings will soon exert a strong influence on the outcome of 
the war. But even so it is better to attack loaded supply ships, 
since the effect will be greater and faster. The further the actual 
sinkings fall below the above figure, the smaller is the likelihood 
that the outcome of the war will be affected decisively by sinkings, 
no matter where, etc. Then it will be all the more urgent to 
attack loaded supply vessels, especially in the South Atlantic, the 
Arctic Ocean and en route to the British Isles, rather than to sink 
any kind of ships at all. 

The decision whether and when such a shift in emphasis is necessary 
depends on the view taken of the future prospects of the submarine 
arm, since, under present conditions, submarines are the principal 
agents of warfare against merchant shipping. 

For copy of the above see l/Skl I833/I4.2 Gkdos, Chefs, in War Diary, 
Part C, Vol. IV. 

The above comment is an integral part of an extensive situation 
survey now being made by the Operations Division, Naval Staff with 
regard to submarine. warfare. 



Situation 16 Sep. 19l|2 

I, War In Foreign Waters 

1, Enemy Situation ; 

Among the unending series of invasion rumors reported by . 
the Intelligence Service, there is an agent's report from France 
according to which operations of Anglo-American forces both in 
western Europe and Africa appear to be imminent early in October, 
While an American operation from Bathurst is to be directed against 
Dakar, with a simultaneous landing at Portudal and other American 
forces are to land at Riah in Morocco, British forces are to 
attempt a landing on the southern bank of the Seine River at Le Havre 
and south of Brest, possibly west of Quimper, In addition, U.S. 
forces are to disembark simultaneously northwest of Bordeaux In the 



-182- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



~) 



~> 



16 Sep. I9I+2 



Garonne estuary in order to penetrate to the center of the unoccupied 
area, where it is allegedly expected that French forces which had 
been organized quickly by preparatory propaganda would join them. 
All of these operations would be preceded . by heavy activity of 
the air forces. 

Such an undertaking would force France to show her 
colors. As matters stand today, even a successful 
large-scale Invasion of French territory would hardly 
suffice to disrupt the policy of Petain and Laval. 
On the contrary, we may assume that France would be 
driven into participation in the war on the Axis side, 
though naturally not without some internal tension. 
It follows that plans as outlined above can succeed 
only if political developments guarantee a more 
favorable outcome, namely, if the enemy can be sure 
that France would not join our side, or, if France 
should join the Axis, that the Ames could fully 
compensate for this, e.g., by alienating an important 
member of the Axis. However, there are no indications 
of such a development at present and therefore, as far 
as France's attitude is concerned, we are justified 
in giving these reports only enough attention to be 
on guard. On the other hand, we should remember that 
clarification of German-French relations, which can 
still be achieved today, would greatly relieve our 
concern. 

More important Is an intelligence report from Rome, dated 12 Sep., 
according to which a. convoy of 26 vessels with tanks, anti-aircraft 
guns, and other war material left a northern Irish port on 23 Aug« 
in the direction of Capetown. 

It Is learned from the same source that Churchill declared in a 
confidential discussion that the British offensive on the Egyptian 
front will begin within the next 10 days or 2 weeks and will last 
for about a month* 

2. Own Situation ; 

In the opinion of the Naval Attache at Tokyo, it cannot 
yet be assumed that the Japanese permission for the voyage of ship 
"10" to Japan has been granted; the ship is therefore instructed by 
Radiogram 0858 not to proceed for the time being. The Naval Staff 
Is endeavoring to clarify the situation. 

Ships "23" and "28" are instructed that the sailing orders issued 
to the TANNENFELS contain the blockade runner routes for the voyage 
from Japan to Europe. The points "Tornado", "Taifun", and "Treibanker" 
as defined In the TANNENFELS sailing orders will be referred to also 
In future instructions to the auxiliary cruisers concerning blockade 
runners. (See Telegram 201+7 . ) 

CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN is instructed to proceed through the Sunda Strait 
and to pick up German seamen at Medan. A pilot will be furnished 
by the Japanese Navy. Sailing instructions for the voyage through 
the Sunda Strait will be given by the Naval Attache at Tokyo who is 
aware of the lack of charts for the voyage to Medan. (See Radio- 
gram OOI43.) 



-185- 



B-1052 



: : : _ ; i '.--.- 
: . : : 

In boo do »lth the eminent passing through the 

area be t we en 1 [atal, the Uaval 2 folios- 

i n z estimate zz d It B t '. on : 

a. iest rf St. Fnl'i 

stall. - : r : St ■ T 

e t - - B : - - 1 : B t 

r_lles to the " . - 
iy froa Ti of 

St • Fa.ul ■ 8 k or i e I ly tc i an r I : d t hm 

E . lie V : ~- at 

course :re=rr I t] 6 - - that :ed 

c. Is a c iota* If 

SCCC r_i Qgly« 

I. I a j r c: :* 

c ze. i ' :: rr e » e " - z :-.e ::" 

bo this effect by Tali crrsrr. 1 T _ 

The r Intelll II islon 

r^ :. ■• : . :::..= ere-- 3 snipping routes ir tde Atlantic ae 

z: ~ i-e;., 115::.-,. the BbBnges vhlch base ::;:::r: since 1; A_z . 1 : _£ 
7re above sstl :-aticn bj the Operations -ivision^ Naval 

::" is based on .ris survey. 7 :r eopy r.:. 21 see l/5kl 22-~:/l£ 
. In tar DLarj , Part -', ?ol. I. 

The Italian bl« 1AZZ0 elll be ready tc Ball overseas 

:r:r. 2 cr ieau-T e&rl- ir. Ictober. ire -ill : :llc» : re 3=_-e sailing 
orders ari re< male ebleh the Iperatlons livialon, Navel 

Staff issuer to the PIETI 71:. 

7:r : ling :i: tc : re Blgjb l:rrrs.ri, Italian 

Kaval i to 1 »st, sltta spy 

:o2Bnr. aval Staff , see 1 Ski Ik* 1 

Gkd:s. Ire: s. ir . "rr -is.: '■': :1 . I . 



II. Si --£:: :r -.es: Ar^ 

1; Sr.ery zL-.-s.zi 

7re Jire- Lord :: the Sdadraltj reil^rei In ss. iiiress 
a: ?:: 7er r:re -acretie, acoustic, and 

aoored mines : than aoold base boon required to 

sink tre entire Iritisr ner: bant ■arlne« a 

2« '.--•- liz .-'.::. : 

Atlrr-.i: ::s.3-. : 

"4. long-range firrters ( : :. ;; ; creratirj ir tre Bay of 
z'.s-.z- :'r. : : loan ~ Ererrj planes for Bare so i £ :":;::':. :re rr r: =.: 1~ . 



■IS*- »-i 



CONFIDENTIAL 



*> 



16 Sep. 1942 



Special Item : 

In view of British efforts to Intercept and combat German submarines, 
particularly in the Bay of Biscay, the northern Spanish coast and 
consequently the entire Iberian Peninsula assume particular importance, 
By establishing air bases or observation posts on the southern shore 
of the Bay of Biscay, the enemy would greatly improve his control o 
this area and at the same time render the German position much more 
difficult. It is therefore of utmost importance to watch the Iberian 
Peninsula for all possibilities which it may offer to enemy actions, 
whether directed against Germany or Italy. The Naval Staff requests 
the Naval Attaches at Madrid and Lisbon to keep this in mind. 

For corresponding directive see l/Skl la I799A2 Gkdos. Chefs. In War 
Diary, Part C, Vol. lib, 

Channel Coast ; 

Torpedo boats T "18" and T "19" collided during the night 
of 15 Sep. and reached Cherbourg In damaged condition. T "18" is out 
of commission (see Telegram 1155)» 

See Telegram 0725 for a report on the enemy air raid on Cherbourg 
during the afternoon of 15 Sep. and on the damage to steamer SOLGLIMT. 
(Compare War Diary of 15 Sep. under Aerial Warfare, Incursions.) 

Mine-exploding vessel "168" was damaged by a particularly strong 
detonation 20 m off her bow, which indicates an unknown powerful 
explosive. In the afternoon the "Grosser Kurfuerst" battery fired 
four 28 cm shells at 1; light warships observed in the harbor of 
Dover, but ceased firing due to the impossibility of observing 
results. 



~> 



Mine -laying 
night of 1( 



operation 
Sep. 



"Oder" (north of Barfleur) is scheduled for the 



Owing to the increased threat from ground mines, traffic on route 
"Herz" between Ostend and Blankenberghe is particularly endangered and 
requires added protection. (See Telegram 16I4.O • ) 

Special Item : 

« 

Differences of opinion between Naval Group Commands West and North 
about furnishing Information to the command authorities of Group North 
about the PT boat operation in the Channel were settled by an agreement 
reached over the telephone by the Commanding Admirals, Group West and 
Group North. In accordance with this agreement Group Noi'th withdraws 
its original demand that the Naval Communications Officer at Utreoht 
be furnished with the data on the radio frequency used by the PT 
boats. On the other hand, the Commander, PT Boats guarantees that the 
command authorities in the area of Group North will receive information 
about PT boat operations to the same extent and just as fast as those 
in the area of Group West. (See Telegram 1800.) 



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B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19U2 

III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Patrol and escort services suffered by bad weather. Enemy 
planes operated off the German Bight coasts during the night of 15 
Sep. and nines were probably laid. Bombs were dropped at Brunsbuettel, 1 
Naval Station, North Sea corrects Its damage report concerning the 
raid on Vtllhelmshaven of 15 Sep. by Telegram ~llj[|5« I4. ground mines 
were swept between Schiermonnikoog and Terschelling, 

2. Norway ; 

An enemy submarine was sighted on 15 Sep. north of 
Svaerholtklubben by air reconnaissance. Following a futile chase, 
our subchaser force was attacked by aerial torpedoes without success. 
The attacking plane was shot down by a subchaser and its documents 
captured. 

Enemy air activity over the arctic coast on 11+ and 15 Sep. Bombs were 
dropped on Kirkenes without causing damage. The Eltevik battery 
will have only 3 guns ready for action for 5 or 6 days beginning 
16 Sep. 

Convoy and transport service according to plan. 

Special Item 

In view of the ordered increase in the number of naval forces in 
Norway, Group North considers the 8 destroyers (including the 
STEINBRINCK) assigned to it as insufficient and suggests the allocation 
of a minimum of 10 or 12 destroyers in order to safeguard freedom 
of action of the fleet forces located in the harbors of Trondheim, 
Narvik and Alta Fjord. Moreover, Group North considers the allocation 
of PT boats for patrol duty during transfers of naval forces highly 
desirable. In this connection the Group places great value on the 
allocation of a number of fleet torpedo boats or ships of the 3rd 
Torpedo Boat Flotilla. (See Telegram I728.) 

Comment by the Operations Division, Naval Staff will follow, 

3. Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Radio monitoring intercepted a report of the 95th A * r 
Regiment of II30 on li| Sep. addressed to the commander of the 
operational air force of the Arctic Ocean fleet: "On 13 Sep. between 
O5I4.2 and I85O the operational group escorted the Allied ships in the 
area (?) to 67 57' N, lj.1 ^4-0 • E in groups of k to 6 planes. We 
executed reconnaissance missions, searching for enemy submarines 
at the White Sea entrance and on approach routes, A convoy of II4. 
ships remained intact while under escort." 

Own Situation ; 

a. Operation against PQ 18 and QP llj. : 

Altogether 5 submarines had contact during the day . 
with convoy PQ 18, proceeding on a southeasterly course. At 1100 



-186- 

B-1052 



*> 



"> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. I9I4-2 

It was reported by a submarine as located In quadrant AC 6*32 in a 
snow storm and with low visibility. Planes lost contact around 
noon, after having reported at 1120 that convoy PQ 18 consisted of 
approximately 31 merchant vessels, 1 aircraft carrier, 1 heavy 
cruiser, 13 destroyers and 8 escort vessels. 

Submarine U "255" executed 2 unsuccessful daylight attacks on the 
aircraft carrier. 

Submarine U "377" reported the probable torpedoing of a steamer in 
quadrant AC 6653 at I918. 

On account of bad weather the Air Force did not attack. 

At 0815 reconnaissance planes reported convoy QP li; on a northerly 
course in quadrant AT I4.87I composed of 18 steamers under escort 
of 5 destroyers and 5 escort vessels. Submarine U "I1.56" reported 
very strong air patrols in quadrant AT 7130. A total of 7 submarines 
are operating against QP lij. • Submarine U "I4.O5" scored a hit on an 
AFPJDI class destroyer at 2200 in quadrant AT k^lk* 

The planes lost contact with QP II4. at noon. 

Group North informs the Naval Staff, with copy to the Commanding 
Admiral, Submarines, about the directive to the Admiral, Arctic 
Ocean which is based on the assumption that PQ 18 and QP lij. will meet 
in the course of the day or during the night. 

For copy of this telegram see l/Skl 22971A2 Gkdos. In file "Eispalast". 

b« Mine-laying operation in the -Iceland area : 

On 3 Sep. Group North requested that submarine U "117", 
which was assigned by the Commanding Admiral, Submarines for a mine- 
laying mission In the Kara Sea, be made available for a mine-laying 
mission In the Iceland area planned by the Group (see War Diary of 
18 Jul.); moreover, it was requested that 152 SMA mines with safety 
mechanism and timing device set for 60 days be provided. 

However the Commanding Admiral, Submarines adheres to his opinion 
that a weapon not ready for operational use must not be used, and that 
when SMA mines are ready for use, there are more urgent tasks to be 
carried out. 

On Xl+ Sep. Group North asked permission to execute the suggested 
operation in the Iceland area immediately by submarine U "117", 
which is to sail from Kiel on 19 Sep., and to postpone mining of 
the Kara Strait which is already frozen most of the time, and, besides, 
is not being used by the enemy as far as could be observed. If it Is 
being used after all, however, then it is planned to have a destroyer 
lay EMF mines with timing device at the western entrance. The Group 
renews its request that submarine U "117" be made available to the 
Group for additional mining operations and that the mines requested 
be allocated unless there are other more important tasks within the 
area of the Commanding Admiral, Submarines. 

Thereupon the Naval Staff decides as follows: 

(1) Permission is granted to use submarine U "117" for the operation 
on the east coast of Iceland instead of in the Kara Strait. 



-187- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. V k2 

(2) The allocation of mines for additional operations ir. the 

area of Group North will be decided on later. This reservation 

is necessary because the report requested from the commanding Admiral,, 

Submarines about the planned mining operations of submarine U "117" 

has not yet been received, 

c. Mine-laying operations in the Arctic Ocean : 

Group North submits to the Naval Staff a copy of its 
directive to the Admiral, Arctic Ocean concerning previous plans 
not yet executed and new mine-laying plana? 

Tasks still to be executed are the operations "Paul", "Iwan I" and 
alternative "Zar" ( "Zar lii-20" by HIPPER). The following operations 
were cancelled: "Rasputin' 1 , because Matochkln Strait is frozen and 
sealed by minefield "Peter"; "Rurik" and the uncompleted sections 
of " Roman ow" and "Iwan II". 

Newly planned are: 

(1) A minefield off Kanin Nos , consisting of approximately 100 EMF 
and EMC mines with timing device set for 60 days to be interspersed 
witn 30 or 1+0 cutter floats, to be laid by 2 destroyers. Code 
name "Zarewna". 

(2) Mining of the approach route to the White Sea with EMF and 
EMC mines without timing devices, also cutter floats, to be laid 
by destroyers. 

d. Blockade of Murmansk : 

The Naval Staff shares the opinion of Group North on 
this matter (see War Diary of I4. Sep.) and submits Its comment, which 
corresponds to the stand of the Group, to the Permanent Representative 
of the Commander In c hief, Navy at the Fuehrer Headquarters, who, 
during a conference with the Chief of Staff, Naval Staff on 17 Jul., 
had asked how Murmansk could be "cut off" from supplies during the 
winter by mine-laying operations. 

For copy of memorandum and telegram see l/Skl. op 1665/^2 Gkdos. 
Chefs. In War Diary, Part C, Vol. VI. 

e. Operations of naval forces : 

Group North informs the Naval Staff about the general 
directive to the Admiral, Arctic Ocean outlining the measures to be 
taken in the probable event that the task force of the Commanding 
Admiral, Cruisers will not be committed against the convoys PQ lo 
and QP II4. • 

(1) (a) At the end of the operation against PQ 18, the SCHEER 
Is to be withdrawn to Narvik with 2 destroyers. 

(b) The TIRPITZ to be withdrawn to Trondheim with the 
destroyers previously assigned to escort the SCHEER and with 
torpedo boats T "9" and "12". 

(2) Following the arrival of convoy PQ 18 at Its destination, 

the HIPPER with the KOELN and lj. destroyers will execute the following 
mission: 



-188- B " 1052 



~) 



"> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19 k2 



20". 



(a) HIPPER to lay mines, for instance the minefields "Zar ll+- 



(b) KOELN (depending on the weather) and destroyers after 
crossing the zone of submarine operations will strike against the 
Kola coast and annihilate the patrol vessels. Depending on the situa- 
tion, they will then return either to Kirkenes or Alta Fjord for 
refueling, whereupon the destroyers are to set out once more to 
pick up the HIPPER. 

Group North requests the Admiral, Arctic Ocean's opinion whether 
it would not be better to substitute a minefield, perhaps ir 
quadrant AT I4.8, for the "Zar" minefield. 

Since the transfer of the TIRPITZ to Trondheim is not 
urgent, the Naval Staff is of the opinion that it 
would be expedient to keep the ship at Narvik for the 
time being, since it is certain that any operational 
opportunity which arises will necessitate a jump-off 
from a point as far north as possible. 

Group North is therefore instructed to postpone the withdrawal 

to Trondheim of the TIRPITZ, unless her return for shipyard repairs 

is unavoidable, in which case this should be reported. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Steamer SCHAFHOERN suffered slight damage from an exploding 
mine in the Kattegat. 

Minefield "Sauna IV" was laid according to plan in the Gulf of 
Finland. Motor mine sweeper R "66" sank in quadrant AO 3?S9 due 
to a mine hit. 7 of the crew survived. Convoy service proceeded 
according to plan. 

Motor mine sweepers and detonations in the Kronstadt Sea Channel ob- 
served by Naval Coastal Artillery Battalion 53^ indicate enemy mine- 
sweeping operations. Group North advises the Commanding Admiral, 
Baltic Countries that it is most urgent to renew the laying of torpedo 
mines by assault boats. Very many mines must be laid, because the 
Russians have demonstrated in the case of "Seeigel" that even a 
mine barrage does not prevent them from breaking through. (See 
Telegrams I33O and 153?.) 



V. Merchant Shipping 

Roosevelt informed Congress of the establishment of "Cargoes 
Incorporated", which will build freighters on a mass production 
basis under the supervision of the Navy Department and the Maritime 
C ommi s s i on . 

According to newspaper reports, Roosevelt spoke of bu: lding a torpedo- 
proof merchant vessel in the U.S.A. The British press calls this type 
vessel a "Seamobile" and assumes that its secret lies in extremely 
shallow draught. 



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B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19^2 

VI. Submarine V.arf^re 

1 • Enemy Sltuaclon : 

Reconnaissance activity in the rendezvous area was centered 
In the Bay of Biscay, A plane was ordered to attack a submarine 
northeast of the Faeroe Islands; later a second plane reported 
a depth charge attack. 

Reports on submarine attacks were intercepted from the St. Lawrence 
River, east of St. Johns, and northeast of Trinidad. The last one 
at I806 originated from an unknown steamer ALEXANDBR H. STEPHENS. 
Also a number of messages reporting sighted submarines were intercepted^ 

2. Own Situation : 

Regarding operation in the Arctic Ocean see Own Situation, 
Arctic Ocean. In the North Atlantic, Group "Pfeil" is operating 
against a convoy in quadrant AK. Contact was maintained intermittently 
and only by a few submarines. Submarine U M 221" reports having 
been driven off to the north by a submarine decoy ship. The operation 
continues. 

k submarines were newly dispatched to the zone of ore rations and have 
orders to head for a line from quadrant AL 22 to AK I+I4. and to report 
when crossing this line. 

Submarine U "165" sank a 6,000 GRT steamer out of a convoy in the 
St. Lawrence River. 

From the 'rtest Indies, submarine U "558" reports sinking a coastal 
steamer of 2,000 GRT in quadrant ED 9995, submarine U "Slij." the 
torpedoing of the British steamer CI0ST0 in quadrant ED 9929. The 
wreck ran aground and was set on fire by gunfire. 

No reports about any successes were received from the South Atlantic 
and the Mediterranean. 

In connection with the LAC ON I A rescue action, the Commanding Admiral, 
Submarines is directed to take along as many of the British officers 
as possible on submarines as prisoners of war, and not to transfer 
them to trench ships-; according to international law, survivors 
taken aboard naval forces of a neutral power have to be interned so 
that there would be danger of their release some time in the future, 
(See Telegram l8l8.) 

Submarine U "I56" was attacked by a U.S. plane, abandoned the rescue 
operation, and withdrew in westerly direction for repairs. 

For additional reports, particularly on the LAC ONI A operation, 

see supplement to submarine situation in war Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 

Daylight reconnaissance and fighter bomber missions against 
Rye and Eastbourne. During the night of IS Sep. fires were caused 



-I90- B " 1052 



16 Sep. 1942 



by raids on Boston and Ipswich, 



CONFIDENTIAL 



~) 



3 



About the enemy planes shot down over the Bay of Biscay by the 13th 
Squadron of the 40th Bomber Wing see Situation West Area. 

Colchester and Harwich were attacked during the night of 16 Sep. 

2. Incursions ; 

Approximately 200 enemy planes penetrated into western 
German territory and reached Osnabrueck, Lemgo, Giessen, Wiesbaden, arid 
Wittlich. 36 of them were shot down. Heavy damage was wrought at 
Dortmund, Oberhausen, Bochum, Duisburg, Essen,- Wuppertal, minor damage 
at Cochem, Wiesbaden-Biebrich, and Neuwied, 

The number of planes shot down is in proper tion with 
the planes involved. The attacks on industrial and 
traffic installations as well as residential sections 
of our towns are reaching highly unpleasant propor- 
tions and will eventually affect our war potential. Thei 
enemy evidently attributes vital importance to the 
devastating and terrorizing effect of his air attacks 
on German territory. 

3. Mediterranean Theater ; 
Nothing to report. 

4. Eastern Front ; 

On 15 Sep. 100 enemy planes were reported shot down by our 
fighters and 18 by anti-aircraft artillery along the various Array 
fronts; on 16 Sep. the figures were 67 and 12 respectively. 

Reconnaissance activity in the areas of the Black Sea and Caspian Sea, 
in the Gulf of Finland and over Lake Ladoga. 

In the Arctic Ocean, 1 PT boat was definitely damaged and 2 more 
probably damaged on 15 Sep. in Pumanki Bay. 

Regarding operations against convoys PQ 18 and QP 14 see Own Situation, 
Arctic Ocean. 

Special Item ; 

The appointment of a commander of advanced training for carrier de- 
tachments as requested on 17 Aug. by the Inspector with the Air Force 
General attached to the Commander in Chief, Navy was refused by the 
Operations Staff, Air Force as unnecessary at this moment. According 
to a communication from the Plans and Schedules Branch, Naval Staff 
Quartermaster Division, the present organizational plan provides for a 
commander of shipborne planes who will take care of the tasks suggested 
for the commander of advanced training. Moreover, an inspector of 
naval air is planned as a higher command. 



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B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19l>2 

VIII. Warfare la the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean: 

Steamer RAVELLO was damaged during an enemy air raid on 
Benghazi at noon. 

Enemy planes attacked Tobruk betwe n 2050 find 2250. At 21 50 the 
Commanding Officer, Supply and Tra .sports, North Africa reported 
an enemy landing L4. km west of Tobruk and enemy forces advancing toward 
Via Balbia. According to a message of 22^0, everything was quiet at 
Tobruk. It may be that the report was caused by an encounter with 
scattered remnants of the earlier landing or with parachutists. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa: 

_________________________________________ _____ t 

The convoy of motor ship BARLETTA was attacked In the 
evening by enemy planes south of the western tip of Crete. The 
convoy ANKARA, with destroyer HERMES and 2 torpedo boats, was 
spotted by British reconnaissance planes 60 miles northwest of 
Tobruk. A naval barge sank on 1I4. Sep. due to high seas while under 
way from Suda to Derna. 

Otherwise, transport service proceeded according to plan. 

h» Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea t 

Enemy Situation : 

Submarines were sighted in the evening of 15 Sep. off 
Candia and northwest of Skiathos . 

Own Situation : 

Losses of personnel were caused by an enemy air attack 
on Candia during the afternoon of ll| Sep. which, according to 
Reuter, was carried out by heavy U.S. bombers. 

Battery 2/^20 is reported ready for operation with 3 guns on 
Prapanon east of Suda. 

Convoy and transport shipping according to plan. 

Special Item : 

As reported by the Chief Administration and Supply Office^ 
of the Commanding General, Armed Forces, Southeast, the reported 
curtailment by 2*j% of the occupation costs was merely an experiment 
which proved a failure. 

The Admiral, Aegean Sea and Group South rightly point to the Injurious 
effects of this experiment and request a decision that in view of the 
progressive devaluation of the Greek currency the amounts of funds 
appropriated for Greece should not be fixed. For details see 
Telegram 1720. 

-I92- B-1052 



1 



1 



CONFIDENTIAL 
16 Sep. 19^2 

The Naval Staff, Quartermaster Division will follow this matter up. 

Black Sea ! 

Bnemy Situation ; 

According to radio monitoring it is probable that the 
large ships located on II4. and 15 Sep. have reached Poti and Batum. 

Reconnaissance planes sighted a convoy on a northwesterly course 
off Gagry at noon; it consisted of a large steamer escorted by 

1 mine sweeper and 2 motor mine sweepers. 

Own Situation : 

Auxiliary mine sweeper XANTEN arrived at Galatz on 11 Sep. 
from Linz. 

Transport and convoy traffic proceeded on the whole according to 
plan. Barge convoys for the Crimea sailed for the first time. 

2 PT boats are scheduled for operation against enemy shipping 

off the coast between Tuapse and Sochi during the night of lb Sep. 

Special Item ; 

Group South submits the requirements for transferring 
coastal batteries to the Caspian Sea and the Caucasian coast to the 
Naval Staff, Quartermaster division. For copy of telegram see 
l/Skl 2302I4-A2 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV a. 



IX. Situation East Asia 

According to Reuter, the Japanese have been landing troops 
on Guadalcanal since 12 oep. and are attacking the airfield. 

According to the United Press, an incendiary bomb was dropped on 
9 Sep. on the southern coast of Oregon (U.S.A. ), probably by a 
plane released from a Japanese submarine. 

U.S. fighter planes attacked Japanese ships and troops on Kiska 
Island in the Aleutians. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

Enemy pressure on all sectors of the Army Group oontinues. 
North of Isherskaya 'in the Grozny area, German forces advanced in an 
easterly direction and forced the enemy to withdraw. 



-193- 



B-1052 



" 



lc Sep. 1 



Array Group B ; 

Long-range reconnaissance sighted a strongly held enemy 
trench system northwest of Astrakhan. In the tattle for Stalingrad 
we repulsed enemy tank attacks in a southern suburb. The enemy is 
trying to prevent a junction cf the forces battling their way to 

center of the city from the south and north. German infantry 
fi_ near the south station succeeded in advancing on either 

a of the railroad and reaching the Tsaritsa niver bank. Strong 
ener.y attacks in the £>on River bend northwest of Svoboda were 
repulsed. Heavy enemy .pressure in the Voronezh area continues. 

Central Army Group : 

.-.r. enemy attack south of Novosil is expected. -Enemy 
troop concentrations in the Sychevka area were dispersed by gunfire. 

ny attacks at Zubtsov and in the Rzhev area continue in unabated 
strength. German ground attack planes supported our successful 

anse. 

Northern Army Group ; 

A strong enemy attack on the penetration point northeast 
of Lyuban was repulsed. Our newly won positions south of Lake 
Ladoga were held successfully by the light infantry division against 
all enemy attacks. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

An enemy scouting detachment which had landed in the 
western sector of Motovski Bay was annihilated by one of our outposts. 

3. North Africa : 

The enemy is feeling his way toward the southern front 
sector with tanks and riflemen. Otherwise normal harassing 
gunfire. 

The report of another enemy landing at Tobruk proved false. 



-I94- B-105 2 



~) 



1 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 1% 'd 

Items of Political Importance 

Madagascar ; 

Accord.' ng to an official report from Vichy, General Annet the 
Governor of Madagascar, has begun negotiations with the British 
Commander in Chief. Fighting continues, however. 

Great Eritain : 

British public opinion considers the severe German air raid on 
London of 15 Sep. I9I4.O an event of greatest historical importance. 
The British Air Ministry published a memorandum about it. The 
Times speaks of "A Trafalgar of the air". For details see 
Political Review No 218, paragraph 2. 

Minister of YJar Production Lyttleton points out that only 20 of 
the expected 80 critical days are left; thereafter the war 
will enter a new phase. If Russia can bear up even a few weeks 
more, the course of events will change in favor of the Allies. 
Time is the important factor. 

For the Minister's remaining statements regarding British war 
production which still exceeds American production see Political 
Review No 2l8, paragraph 3. 

The London Times report on the German demands for French shipping 
space"] of which the Government is aware, is' on the whole accurate. 
A decision on these demands has not been made. It seems that the 
newspaper has learned nothing of the concessions offered by 
Germany in return. 

Syr ia : 

De Gaulle's attempt at reconciliation between Generals Catroux 
and Spears seems to have failed. De Gaulle has left Beirut for 
French Equatorial Africa. 

Iceland ; 

The Althing has postponed the decision on the question of 
independence until after a plebiscite, a development which Is 
highly pleasing to Denmark. 

Japan ; 

In connection with rumors current in foreign countries about 
Japanese efforts to mediate between Moscow and Berlin, the 
Japanese Office of Vvar Information denies a report of an alleged 
visit in Moscow by Ambassador Sato. 

Iran ; 

The Transocean News Agency reports that the Russian Army con- 
fiscated Iranian tonnage lying in Iranian Caspian Sea ports 
following the failure to reach an amicable agreement. 



-195- B-1052 



TIAj 



1? Sep. 19U2 



Special Items : 



A compilation of enerr.y information obtained by the radio decoding 
and intercept services during the period of 7 to 13 Sep, is 
contained in Radio Intelligence Report No 37A-2 issued by the 
Naval Communications Division, Communications Intelligence Branch, 

Reference is made to the description of the U.S. radio monitoring 
achievements against German submarines on the North Atlantic 
coast with a chart showing the information obtained since 1 Aug • 
19U2 (see top secret radio intelligence report (XB), pages 6 to 9). 

The Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff calls the attention 

of the Chiefs, Naval Communications division and Naval Intelligence 

Division to the discrepancy between XE, report no, 36/I4.2 of 

10 Sep, lH|2 and the picture presented by the Naval Intelligence 

Division, Foreign Merchant Marine Branch with regard to enemy 

shipping routes in the Atlantic. In the opinion of the ^hief, 

Operations Division, Naval Staff the original text of the Eritish 

sailing instructions does not in itself indicate whether ship 

traffic is to be routed inside or outside a 300 mile strip off 

the coast; this ambiguity should have been pointed out in the 

XB report. The Naval Staff holds that in any case the information 

obtained by the Chief, Naval Communications Division exclusively 

from the radio intercept and radio deciphering services should be 

evaluated in consultation with the Intelligence Division, Naval 

Staff where intelligence from all available sources is concentrated. 

For copy of letter see l/Skl I k 2300l+A*2 Gkdos . in V«ar Diary, 
Part C, Vol. I. 

This touches on the much debated organizational 

problem as 1 whether the Radio Intelligence 

Service should primarily be regarded as a matter 

of tactical and technical nature or as of operational 

nature. 



Situation 17 Sep. I9I4.2 

I. V?ar in Foreign Vnaters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

According to an Italian report from Lourenco Marques, 
the 3 battleships RODNEY, REVENGE, RAMILLIES, the submarine CLYDE, 
and a number of escort vessels were at Durban on 8 Sep, A total 
of 60,000 U.S. troops was being expected at Gapetown, U,000 of 
which arrived on 28 Aug. a convoy of 12 ships sailed from Durban 
for Madagascar on 2 Sep, The ships anchored in the Durcan roads 
are protected by planes and torpeio coats. Approximately 30#000 
men are at Durban at the present time. A few of the warships 
lying at Durban belong to the U.S« Navy, 

According to a French communication of 17 Sep. to the German 
Armistice Commission, British forces on Madagascar are slowly ad- 
vancing in the direction of Tananarive. On ll| Sep, they reached 
Andriba which was occupied on 16 Sep. Morondava was evacuated again 
on li+ Sep, Additional British forces landed in the northwestern 



-I96- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 19 1+2 

part of the island between Analalava and Ambajana. The Vichy 
Government has requested Governor General Annet to confirm that 
he will continue to resist in accordance with his orders. 

An intelligence report of 11 Sep. states that near Rakka a 600 m 
steel bridge across the Euphrates River has been in use since 
the middle of August. 

2 • Own Situation : 

The Japanese Navy has finally agreed to the visit by 
ship "10" but requested that the ship call at Balik Papan after 
passing Sunda Strait and take on a capacity load of Tarakan oil 
for use of the blockade-runners in Japan. Ship "10" is to refuel 
later in the southern area on her return voyage. 

The Naval Staff instructs ship "10" accordingly by Radiograms 
1250 and 221+3. 

The Naval Staff informs the Naval Attache at Tokyo that ship "10" 
will sail on 20 Sep. from I3 00' S, 105 00' E to the Sunda 
Strait at a rate of 15 knots. 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo reports that the Japanese Navy will 
bring the German seamen from Medan to Shonanho (Singapore), where 
they will be put aboard the CHARLOTTE SCiILIEl.lANN after 50 war 
prionsers have been taken off. The SCHLIEMANN is to sail directly 
to Shonanho through the Sunda and Karimata Straits, where she will 
load as much oil as possible for the Japanese Navy and then pro- 
ceed directly to Japan. The Japanese Navy Is investigating 
whether it is possible for the ship to take on 2^0 tons of Tarakan 
oil at Shonanho for German test purposes. If this is impossible, 
the tests cannot be carried out. (See Telegram 2011.) 

The Naval Staff Informs the WESERIAND by Radiogram 1552 as follows: 

"Southbound enemy shipping is routed between 100 and 200 miles, 
northbound traffic between 200 and 300 miles east of St. Paul's 
Rock. In addition there Is direct traffic somewhere along the 
line Bahia to Freetown. This should be borne In mind if the 
ship is sighted and has to assume a deceptive course. A straight 
course from point "Waschbord" to point "Welle" appears to be 
favorable at this moment, but it is preferable to keep to the 
east rather than to the west thereof." 

Enemy situation report to all ships in foreign waters by Radiogram 
0ii21 and O75O. - 



II. Situation West Area 

1. £-nemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 



B-1052 

-197- 



17 Sep. 1942 

2. Own Situation ; 

Atlantic Coast ; 

2 ground mines were swept in the ^ironie estuary, 

aval Staff informs Group West, with copy to the Commanding 
al, Submarines, that the aJFEIS will sail around 23 Sep. 

from tne center of large quadrant C-D after delivering supplies 
to the auxiliary cruisers "25" and "23". She will proceed north 
at a speed of 11 knots and will sail at a top speed of 15 knots 

tween I5 S and 10° N and after crossing 3*5° ?!. Group Viest 
is requested to investigate whether the ship can get through at 
these speeds in view of the present enemy situation. The Group 
is to assume command of the ship after she reach=s ^0° N. The 

LS is camouflaged as the TOHRENS or the TALtiOT. She 
has temporary orders to proceed via I4.2 N, 37° *j k&° 30' N, 
22° 00* 7>; k3° l+B* N, 07° 52' W. 

Channel Coast ; 

2 enemy planes, one a [{.-engine bomber, were shot down 
at 0100 and 012o by naval coastal artillery. 

ne -laying mission "Oder" was executed according to plan. 

Special Items ; 

a. The Naval Staff investigated the question of 
whether some of the ships of the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla 
could be used to escort ship "l4-5"» the sailing of which can 

no longer be postponed; it was decided that the 3 ships FALKE, 
, JAGUAR can be used for the purpose in spite of certain 
inconveniences . 

An order to this effect is given by l/3kl I op 2293UA2 Gkdos . 
For copy see War Diary, Part C, Vol. II b. 

Group Viest reports that, according to a report of the Jvd Torpedo 
Eoat Flotilla, the engine overhaul of T "10" and T "li|" may 
be postponed by 1+ 'weeks in each case. (See Telegram 2215»1 

b, A supplement to the Naval Staff's report to the 
Operations Staff, Armed forces High Command concerning The 
Casquets is forwarded by Telegram l/Skl I a 22769 f\\2 Gkdos. For 
copy see War Diary, Part C, Vol. II b. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 
1. North Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation 1 

Heavy enemy air activity in the area of northern Holland 

-I98- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



17 Sep. 19i+2 



1 



Z> 



was reported during the night of 16 Sep. One plane was shot down 
at Ijmuiden by naval anti-aircraft. A ground mine was swept off 
Schiermonnikoog and one off Ameland. Convoys from the Elbe River 
to Hook of Holland were postponed for 2l+ hours due to bad weather. 
Traffic on the Elbe and Ems Rivers had to be suspended. 

2. Norway ; 

Lively enemy air activity on 15 and 16 Sep. is reported. 
Bombs were dropped at several points on the arctic and north 
Norwegian coasts. 3 British torpedo planes sank steamer KARPF ANGER 
( U » 9 7U ORT) out of a convoy near Obrestad at noon on 17 Sep. 

On 15 Sep. at 21+00 a Russian battery on the RybachI Peninsula fired 
without result on a westbound convoy. A patrol vessel of the 
Coastal Patrol Group, West Coast sank on lo Sep. due to a collision. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway submits a supplementary report of 
the Admiral, Arctic Coast about the sinking of steamer B0RNH0FEN; 
he shares the view expressed therein that the sinking was caused 
by an explosion from within the ship, probably a bomb planted in 
the coal cargo. It could not have been caused by a mine, since 
the steamer was proceeding behind a minesweeper and no mines 
were observed afterwards. Ground mines could not have been In- 
volved, since the water depth measured 100 m. Torpedo tracks 
or columns of water were not observed. (See Telegram I855O 

3» Arctic Ocean : 

a. Operation against PQ 18 and QP ll| ; 

Reconnaissance planes reported PQ 18 at 0950 In 
quadrant AT 7H7» consisting of approximately 30 merchant vessels 
on a course of lo0°, without the aircraft carrier which evidently 
had been shifted to convoy QP II4.. At I55I submarine U "251" 
sighted 3 destroyers and ship-borne planes, probably belonging 
to the carrier, in quadrant AC 3568. Neither submarines nor 
aircraft were able to close In for attack on either convoy. 

Submarine operations against PQ 18 have, on the whole, been 
terminated. Nothing has been heard from submarines U "88", 
tj "1+57", and U "589", which must unfortunately be considered lost. 
The results achieved by the submarines, 15 of which were operating 
at times against PQ 16, amount to the sinking of 1+ steamers, 
totalling 2l|, 000 GRT, 3 torpedoings with 1 hit each on steamers 
and 2 probable hits on destroyers; the loss of 3 submarines is 
a high price for this unsatisfactory achievement, which must be 
attributed to the strong defenses of the convoy and to the sub- 
marine captains' lack of experience In combatting heavily 
escorted convoys. The Naval Staff requests Group North to sub- 
mit a final review of this operation. In view of the strength of 
convoy PQ 18, which is reported still to consist of 31 merchant 
vessels, the Group is convinced that the Air Force's reports 
about damage to numerous vessels must be due to duplications 
and incorrect observation, and that submarines therefore have 
little prospect of finding damaged ships. For this reason it Is 
best to continue the battle against PQ l8.as long as possible. 
The Group further raises the question whether It would not be 
advisable, In view of the strong defense to be expected, to launch 
a massed attack of submarines against the whole convoy QP ll| from 



-199- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 191+2 

a greater distance and to fire G 7 A type torpedoes from a fine 
angle on the tow. 

The Commanding Admiral, Group North expressed his great appreciation 
for the excellent performance of the submarines during the operations 
against convoy PQ lS. 

.8 submarines can be in patrol line between quadrants AC 2171 and 
AC ?)|)|li at 1700 on .18 Sep. 

7 submarines are engaged in the operation against QP li(.. 

b. Concerning fuel supply for the submarines operating 
in the Arctic Ocean ; 

With regard to the adverse attitude of the Command- 
ing Admiral, Submarines (see War Diary 15 Sep.) Group North re- 
marks that it is not in a position to judge whether training '» 
is as important as operations in the Atlantic. The distance 
which will have to be covered in future operations on account 
of the changes in the enemy's convoy 3ystem ( PQ and QP convoys 
meet off Novaya Zemlya) is 5»200 miles, according to the Group's 
calculations. Thus, if it is Impossible to allocate submarine 

>ers, Group North considers it necessary to have a number of 
naval larges, converted into small-size tankers, stand by in the 
northernmost island waters of northern Norway. 

c. Submarine operations planned in -the Arctic Ocean ; 

Group North informs the Naval Staff, with copies 
to the Commanding Admiral, Submarines and the 5th Air Force, of 
its new directive to the Admiral, Arctic Ocean about the dis- 
position of submarines for intercepting and combatting convoys; 

(1) As soon as convoy QP ll|. has reached port, 

3 submarines are to lay the minefields "Paul", "Iwan", and "Knospe 
II"; the remaining boats will rest and attend to repairs. 

(2) Approximately a week later 2 or 3 submarines 
are to maintain a permanent patrol line off. Iceland. 

(3) 2 or 3 submarines are to guard the Bear 
Island passage or the entrance to the White Sea, attention to be 
focused on Bear Island. 

(Ij.) When definite information about approaching 

convoys is received, all submarines standing by at all ports are 
to be used for a concentrated attack. 

The 5th Air Force is requested to reconnoiter and patrol the 
waters between Iceland and Jan Mayen as well as the Denmark Strait 
and to gather information about the principal convoy assembly 
places and the Iceland fjords. 



V. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Steamer SCHARHOERN reached Aalborg under her own power. Motor 
ship ANNIE (235 GRT) sank off Samsoe after striking a mine. The 



*»/v« B_1052 

-200- 



~) 



') 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 191*2 

Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea submits a belated report 
of a mine detonation near steamer TRAUTENFELS west of Kallundborg 
which took place on 15 Aug. ; the ship suffered no damage. 

The Swedish Navy recommended that if at all possible Swedish merchant 
vessels sail within Swedish territorial waters between Oeregrund 
and Norra Kwacken. 

The Naval Staff forwards this information from the German Naval 
Attache at Stockholm to Group North, the Baltic Naval Station, 
and the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea, with the request 
from the Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping that everything 
be avoided that might increase the :iiff icultie s of Swedish ore 
shipping, since the ore transport situation is so critical. The 
Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping is willing to accept the 
greater risk involved. 

Except for convoy traffic which proceeded according to plan, all 
other activity in the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic 
Sea suffered from bad weather. 

The Naval Liaison Staff, Finland requests an early decision whether 
the coastal mine laying vessels and the Italian subchasers are to 
remain in or to be removed from Lake Ladoga, because the Salma 
Canal will also be frozen by the middle of October. (See Telegram 

11+30.) 

Group North reports the schedule planned for the trip east of the 
Commanding Admiral, Group North between 20 and 29 Sep. See Tele- 
gram 2155* 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Lively reconnaissance activity, particularly in the 
Bay of Biscay, where 3 submarines were reported. A submarine 
attack was reported i|50 miles north of Georgetown, 

The Canadian Navy Minister announced that an Atlantic convoy was 
attacked by submarines during the week ending on 12 Sep. and that 
Lj. guard ships and 1 escort vessel were lost. Submarine activity 
off the Canadian coast- has apparently been increased as a result 
of improved defenses along the U.S. east coast. 

A Reuter dispatch from authoritative London sources which asserts 
that the German claim of having sunk 19 ships during the submarine 
operations against an Atlantic convoy (as reported by a communique 
of the Armed forces High Command) is far from true. 

The communique of the Armed forces High Command 
concerning the operation of Group "Vorwaerts" 
which is referred to in the above denial corresponds 
to the suggestion of the Commanding Admiral, Sub- 
marines. In the case in question, reports were 
received about a considerable number of unconfirmed 
torpedo hits, from which the Commanding Admiral, 
Submarines assumed that 3 steamers were sunk. Should 



-201- B ~ 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 1?42 

this be the cause of the discrepancy, the British 
have no right to deny our report in such strong 
terms • 

According to press reports, the Brazilian steamer BARBACENA (6,375 
GRT) and the tanker PIAVE (2,5)4.7 GET) were sunk probably around 
the end of July. 

2. Own Situation : 

3 additional submarines have left Germany, and 1 has 
left western France. Regarding operations against convoys ?«i 18 
and '^P II4 see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

In the North Atlantic, Group "Loss" was directed to operate 
against an HX convoy which'was located in quadrant AJ by radio 
monitoring. 

Group "Pfeil" was unable to establish contict with the convoy 
reported in quadrant AK. The Group will proceed from a patrol 
line quadrant AK 5966 to AK 981I+ to a new line from AK 6587 to 
AK 965U where another westbound convoy may be expected to show up. 

No successes were reported from the American coast. 

Submarine U "515" reported from the West Indies that she sank- 
the steamer MARY (7,200 GET) in quadrant E0 '1326. 

South' Atlantic Grou p: Submarine U "552" is to oper-te off the 
Tejo River mouth. 

Group "litis" is deployed in patrol line from quadrant DT 5^19 
to DT 6619. 

Submarine U "109" sank the British steamer PETEETON (5,221 GRT) 
in quadrant EE 3258. 

In the course of the LACONIA rescue operation, submarine U "507" 
transferred 163. Italians to the dispatch vessel ANNAMITE and 
kept the communications officer and another British officer of the 
LACONIA on board. 7 life boats with approximately 33O British 
and Poles are at point "Treibanker" in quadrant FE §ol2, additional 
life boats are. 'in quadrant FS 9619. The GLOIRE was informed of 
their positions. Submarine U "506", too, has delivered survivors 
to the dispatch vessel; the submarine was unsuccessfully attacked 
by an enemy sea plane at noon. 

For additional reports see supplement to submarine situation in 
War Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 

Since the entire route "Anton" is now within the zone closed to 
submarine opera ti one, single ships may no longer be attacked east 
of 20° W and north of 5 S. However, according to the Commanding 
Admiral, Submarines, this zone offers good possibilities, and 
he has therefore requested that the waters north of a line from 
300 W. 0° N to I5 W 5 S and hence along latitude 5 S to the 
African coast be reopened for submarine operations. 

In view of blockade runner traffic, the Naval Staff cannot approve 
the request in its entirety, but defines the eastern border of route 
"Anton" as follows until further notice, to become effective at on0e: 



-202- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 19i|2 

The Spanish coast at [4.2° N via I4.2 N 30° W, 10° N 30° W, the 
equator at 20° W, 5° S I5 v.; from there along latitude 5° S to 
the African coast. In addition, a strip 300 miles wide along 
the African coast is open to submarine attacks. The western 
border of route "Anton" remains the s ame as heretofore. 

See Telegram '615 for the corresponding order to the Commanding 
Admiral, Submarines. 

Following consultation with the Foreign Office, permission to 
execute the planned mine-laying operations off New York is granted 
as of today. 

For copy of order see l/Skl 1 c/e 22751A2 Gkdos . in War Diary, 
Part C, Vol IV. 

For details see War Diary, Part C, Vol. VIII. 



VI. Aerial warfar e 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 

Reconnaissance operations were carried out. Harwich 
and V.- or thing were attacked by fighter bombers during the day. 
Kings lynn and Great Yarmouth were raided during the night of 

15 Sep. 

2 • Incursions : 

10 to 15 enemy planes penetrated into the Bordeaux area 
and attacked the harbor. For damage report see daily situation 
report. 10 enemy planes also mined the waters north of Cherbourg. 

3, Mediterranean Theater ; 

Today's activities included missions at the African 
front, convoy escorts and a fighter attack on Malta. 

i|* Eastern Front ; 

65 enemy planes were shot down at the Army front. Re- 
connaissance flights were carried out over the Black Sea. 

From Lake Ladoga a bomber attack with good results on the Selenez 
Islands radio station is reported to have been carried out on 

16 Sep. Regarding operations against convoys PQ 18 and QP II4. see 
Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

An Italian signal station on Sardinia was fired on by 
an enemy submarine on lb Sep. An enemy submarine was sighted 
on 17 Sep. off Cape Misurata and another off Rhodes. Otherwise 



-203- 



B-1052 



: _ ....1 

17 -- • "- - _ 

not: I : report from 1 

I'-.e '-- ' £ . ="r .:_-:■:■- - [EH and 

. 

£. l-..r. -£££-! :r., .ri - - zs. : 

The : r of the star 1 Lne Sweeper Flotilla 

Lnt< aotor torpedc aat "''-.' as a 

f ast subchac Lean coast • 

. Italy the c osnei tment 

of a ss to tie westei Due to the preset t 

state of r( f our a t safely count on 

_ : _ £ 3 at buz _i=posal by October f: ions In 

the eastei 2 for the ae: ten i n. 

Pointing to the sll prospects Lr :':. e et tei ind 

the e . aval 

and, Italy rta its intention t at least 2 s 

Kedltei to have at 1 ast T sub- 

£ In 3 for the new moon perJ - ". 

1 the eastern b Lterranei would have tc t Che 

Italy - r convinc-- t] the aneary, he is 
aware that t ^rnan Air -rarce is tied up, will £ 

- £ the _ test during the >ctobe new moon pLase for a new 
la. - :ale c ton f or ti ly of Kalta. rherefore the 

. - . _ - ,'.'.' - - - ~ £ :er: 

an would be . -. . 

The laval -raff approves of these plana* As far as list: i£ . :i cr. 
Is concerned, centra ted in t 

edlt€ til : notic-. However, the eastern 

Lterranee Id stripped completely in viec of 

: . the east and 
on account of a rcoas-s occur! y our 

for: es . 

For cot- of iirective see l/Skl I u 1+2 Gkdos. Chef . It 

War £ :, Vol. XIV. 

T • lrsr. = 7::t ::' 3.:~"li-5 :- :_££.-. Africa : 

The convoy of t: IEK, bound for Tobruk,wa£ spotted 

at noon on 17 Sep, lalssance planes 60 Ilea 

south of Crete. j en route to Tobruk »: 

by e of 17 Sep. northwest of Tobruk. 

iTOKE (1,01c GRI ran s. i 50 miles south of ofax 

1 le pr : : I ':-'.:: :: Irlrcli, 

£D report about supply and coastal shipping. 

h» .-- - ":.-! ?-: : . : ;. : £:. : 
.-.£ - a Sea: 

- 

During the night of 15 ££ . Tandia was arain attacked 
by enemy planes. ir. the harbor was sli r.t. Otherwise 



■-:::: 
-204- 



D 



D 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 19^2 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

During the afternoon of 16 Sep. 2 escorted tankers, 
one northbound, the other southbound, were sighted by air 
reconnaissance between Gelendzhik and Tuapse. A heavy cruiser 
and 1 destroyer were ob erved on a northwesterly course southwest 
of Sukhum. At noon 1; steamers were heading northwest in the 
waters off Tuapse. Photo reconnaissance at O6J4.5 °*' ^7 Sep. located 

1 battleship, 5 cruisers, 5 submarines, 1 torpedo boat, 7 tankers 
and 15 steamers at batum. 

Own Situation : 

PT boats operating during the night of 16 Sep. north 
of Sochi found no trace of the enemy. Apparently all enemy 
trfffic along the Caucasian coast moves only by day on account 
of the attacks by our PT boats at night. 

2 naval barges in tow between Yalta and Feodosiya were unsuccessfully 
attacked by enemy planes on 16 Sep. During an enemy air raid 

on Kerch, one motor mine sweeper was severely damaged. 2 motor 
mine sweepers and 1 naval barge suffered minor damages. The 
net barrage at Feodosiya was completed. Yalta'a anti-aircraft 
defenses were reinforced with six 2 cm machine guns. Unfortunately, 
heavy anti-aircraft artillery is not available. 

Submarine chase, mine -sweeping and convoy operations proceeded 
according to plan. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 

According to a Tokyo report, Japanese submarines and warships 
sank 72,000 GRT during August, bringing the total since the begin- 
ning of the war to 27I ships with 1,715,000 GRT. 

The U.S. Navy Department belatedly announced the less of aircraft^ 
carrier Y0RKT0WN during the battle of Midway Island on 6 Jul. 

Japanese operations on Guadalcanal developed into a large-scale 
offensive. 

The U.S. Pacific fleet reports that at least 2 Japanese ships were 
sunk and 5 planes shot down during an air raid on Kiska. Fires 
and explosions were caused among the harbor installations and 
oil storage tanks. 

In connection with the sinking of the Italian hospital ship ARNO, 
the Japanese state that the Japanese hospital ship KHARBIN MARU 
was attacked by enemy submarines as early as 10 Jan. and hospital 
ship ASAMA MAEU on 26 Mar. by enemy planes. 



-205- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. 19U2 

IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A ; 

The Staff of this A rmy Group has been transferred to 
Vor oshilovsk. The commander of the Group, Field Marshal List, 
has been relieved. 

An enemy landing attempt southwest of Novorossisk during the 
night was repulsed. Enemy attacks continued at all sectors of 
the Caucasian front. 

Army Group B ; 

In the battle for Stalingrad we succeeded in capturing 
additional sectors of the devastated city. The 2uth Panzer 
Division and the 71 s * Infantry Division, attacking from the 
south and north respectively, established contact with each other. 

Strong enemy tank formations attacked the former penetration 
point at the southeastern outskirts of Voronezh. Counterattacks 
are In progress. Also north of Voronezh we repulsed an enemy 
tank attack. 

Central Army Group ; 

The expected enemy offensive south of Novosil began 
in the morning hours and was halted at all sectors. The battle 
will certainly be renewed. The enemy resumed his attacks also 
in the Rzhev area. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Strong Russian forces attempted to force a concentric 
breakthrough a-t the northern sector of the Demyansk front. This 
and other attacks northwest of Lyuban and at either side of the 
plateau were repulsed. South of Lake Ladoga the enemy succeeded 
in breaking through the line of our light Infantry division; 
the penetratl-on was sealed off and measures were taken to restore 
the situation. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

According to statements obtained from war prisoners, 
an oil pipe line runs from Kobona northward to the lighthouse 
in the Chernoye area, hence across Lake Ladoga westward to 
Irinovka and overland to Leningrad. 

Strong enemy forces attacked at Maselskaya. The annihilation of 
enemy units which succeeded In penetrating our lines is in pro- 
gress. Deserters predict a general offensive on the entire 
northeastern front for 20 Sep. Enemy forces which attacked 
southern wing of the Litsa sector were almost completely destroyed 
by a successful flanking maneuver. 

5. North Africa ; 

The day passed quietly at the El Alamein front. 



B-1052 
-2O6- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
17 Sep. I942 

Gialo oasis is under attaak of strong enemy forces. Due to 
the weakness of the Italian garrison its captrre by the enemy 
must be expected. For details see daily situation report. 



~) 



" 



B-1052 
-207- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 
Madagascar : 

According to official French reports, opposition will continue since 
the negotiations of the Governor of Madagascar with the attackers 
have failed. 

Middle East : 

According to Reuter, the transfer of the entire Polish Army from 
Russia to the operations zone of the Middle Ea6t has been completed. 

Brazil : 

President Vargas ordered general mobilization on 16 a ep. 

Japan : 

The chief of the Ofiice of Information, Mr. Tani, was made Foreign 
Minister. In his first radio address the new minister stated tnat 
the war will be long and drawn-out in spite of the brilliarit suc- 
cesses of the Japanese Armed Forces. 

The Japanese-directed Chinese press protests against the growing 
U.9. influence on Chungking and demands greater cooperation with 
Japan. Diplomatic "circles conclude from Japanese propaganda and 
from official statements, that the recent military operations in 
China did not produce the expected results. 

U.S.A. : 

The fact that a U.S. Red Cross ship was despatched to France is 
taken as an indication that the U.S. does not intend to alter her 
relations with Vichy. 



Conference on tne Situation with the Chief of Staff. Naval Staff 

The Chiefs Naval Construction Division reports that the 
SCHaRNHORST will not be reaay for operations as early as expected 
since her propeller was damaged through contact with a buoy mooring 
chain. 

The only war transport vessel to be built in Germany was built at 
the Deutsche 'Verft and was completed within 90 days. Italian 
shipyards should strive to equal this achievement. As reported 
by the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, the ship will be 
engaged in enuttle service between Kirkenes and Petsarao. 

Otherwise no reports nor decisions of importance. 



B-1052 

-208- 



~> 



D 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sec 1942 

Special Items : 

I. The Naval Staff maices tne following decision regarding dis- 
position of tne lignt naval forces: 

According to prevailing orders ant plans, tne following forces are 
available: 

a) To Naval Group North: All destroyers which are reaay for 
action, and the 2nd Torpedo Boat Flotilla (iJ torpedo boats are 
engaged in open water firing at Trondneim, all others are assigned 
to the Torpedo School in so far as needed) . 

b) To Naval Group West: Tne 3rd and 5tn Torpedo Boat Flotillas. 
For tne time being it is not possible to assign fleet torpedo boats 
or vessels of tne 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla to Group Nortn. 

For corresponding directive to Group North witn copies to Group West, 
the Fleet Command, tne Admiral, Arctic Ocean, and tne Comma.nding 
Admiral, Cruisers, see Telegram 1717. 

II. See Telegram 1300 for executive order of tne Commander, 
Destroyers instructing torpedo boat T "22", tne FALKE, and the 
JAGUAR to escort snip "45" in tne west area in accordance with orders 
of Naval Staff. * (See War Diary 17 Sep.) 

III. The Armed Forces Intelligence Division transmitted the personal 
views or a reliable agent wno asserts that tne withdrawal of our 
battlesnios from tne Atlantic coast nas afforded Britain an almost 
unbelievable degree of relief. This very interesting report, wnich 
on tne who.'.e certainly gives a correct picture of tne situation, 

is contained in War Diary, Part C, vol. II a under 1/Skl 31 572/42 
geh. 

IV. Anotner intelligence report from an agent who nas not been 
tested so far but wno appears reliable, deals witn Britisn plans 

in the Middle East. It asserts tnat Aucninleck's successor as com- 
manier of tne 8tn (Egyptian) Army, General Alexander, nas drawn up 
a plan for establisning a second front in tne Middle East with all 
available means. Churchill is paid to nave taken this plan to 
Moscow. The attempt of tne strong convoy to force passage tnrougn 
tne Mediterranean was already in line witn Alexander's plans and 
was connected with tne arrival of strong, fresh American forces at 
Basra and of Britisn units at Suez. Tnese forces arrived without 
heavy armament and were to have been equipped with tne materiel 
carried by tne convoy wnicn was destroyed and dispersed in the 
Mediterranean. Tne American forces landed at Basra are estimated 
at 30,000 men, the majority of whom have remained as occupation 
troops in Iraq, wnere nardly any Britisn units are left; the rest 
is destined for Iran, 

Alexander's plan is said to be aimed in the first place at mustering 
the strongest possible force to oppose Rommel; in tne second place, 
at establisning a strong position in the Caucasus with tne aid of 
the witndrawn Russian Caucasian army, a reserve army located in the 
Tiflis area, as well as fresn Britisn and American forces and Indian 
and Iranian auxiliary troops. In this way a German breakthrough 
to Iran is to be prevented, and strong German forces are to be tied 
up in the Caucasuc at tne same time. In snort, Alexander's plans 
provide for a very heavy concentration of Allied forces in the Near 
East, facing north and west. 



-209- 8 ~ 105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



18 Sen. 1942 



Politically, the plan is said to aim at ©reserving the alliance with 
Turkey, and at foiling potential German plans to cause Turkey to 
abandon her present neutrality in favor of Dro-Germar. non-belligerency 
as the result of further German military successes close to Turkey. 
It appears altogether possible that Turkish participation in an Allied 
Caucasus front is the ultimate political aim of the nlan. 

In connection with the Anglo-American plans for warfare in the Near 
East outlined above, it should be remembered that nothing would suit 
Turkey better than a strong concentration of Anglo-American forces 
In the Near East; Turkey fears nothing more than a Rommel victory in 
Egypt, which would clcse the Suez Car.al, jeopardize Turkey's imports 
and, most of all, would throw Turkey 1 6 foreign policy out of balance. 

The report deserves earnest consideration and is very 
plausible. 



Situation 18 Seo. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Cwn 3ituation : 

The Naval Staff informs ship "28" and the UCXER.YARK that 
the latter should head for point "Wagner" every day after 24 Sen. for 
a rendezvous with ship "10"; after completing her supply mission, the 
UCKERILARK is to proceed to point "Schumann" for a rendezvous with 
ship "23". 

Ship "10" is advised by Radiogram 0513 of the sailing instructions 
for the voyage to Balik Faoan as wired by the ?Iaval Attache at Tokyo. 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo requests a suitable cover r.a-e for the 
RA213ES and in reply to an inquiry of the "aval Staff elves a report 
on the captain of the D0GGER3A:^C, Schneiderrina. See feleerams 1138 
and 1501. 

By Telegram 1810, the Attache further reports that the RE:-E::S3"JRG 
has been advised to take aboard German repatriates at Batavia and 
requests suppression of any publicity regarding their experiences, 
because such publicity might jeopardize the repatriation of more 
German nationals from these areas. 

Enemy situation report to all shiDS in foreign waters by Radiogram 
2026. 



-210- B * 1052 



: 



: 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

;il. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance over the Channel revealed nothing of 
interest. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Atlantic Coast : 

Mine-exploding vessels swept 2 mines off the Gironde mouth. 
The shipping lane from Le Verdon to Bordeaux was closed. 

Channel Coast ; 

Torpedo operations of the 5th PT Boat Flotilla during the 
night of 17 Sep. brought no results. Tne convoy attacked was able 
to dodge most of the torpedoes on account of their phosphorescent 
tracks. *'or short report see Telegram 1020. Low-flying planes 
attacked battery Ramin at 1520; one attacker was shot down. A motor 
launch was sunk as a result of anotner enemy air attaok off Ostend. 

Mine-laying operation "Elbe" is scheduled for tne nignt of 18 Sep. 

Group West reports on additional mine-laying projects to reinforce 
the minefields off Fecamp by minefields "Erail V n (code name "Donau") 
and "Erail VI" (code name "Mosel"). 



III. North Sea, Norway. A r otio Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

1 ground mine was swept north of Borkura by a mine-sweeping 
plane. It is belatedly reported that a Danish trawler sank on 27 Aug. 

60 miles west of Blavandshuk following 2 mine explosions. 

Escort and patrol operations in the area of the Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, North proceeded according to plan. 

2, Norway ; 

According to the captain of steamer ROBERT BORNHOFEN, 
who was questioned at Tromnoe, it in hignly probable tnat a torpedo 
was responsible for the ship's loss. It is not believed that a 
mine or sabotage were responsible. 

On 17 Sep. a floating crane with armored cupola capsized at Haugesund 
while in tow and sank in shallow water. 

Enemy air activity was reported over the Arctio coast on 15 Sep. and 
over the west coast on 17 Sep. 

Convoy service in the area of the Commanding Admiral, Norway pro- 
ceeded according to plan without interference. 



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B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

Between Lister and Feiestein ar.ti-f ubmarine barrages will be laid 
upon receipt of the code word "Riegel". 

In consideration of tne required combat training, Group North 
suggests tne November new moon period for tne transfer of tne 
SCHARHHORST. At the same time 5 destroyers will be ready for trans- 
fer from Germany. (GALSTER, RIEDEL, STHNBRINCK, IHN, and JACC3I.) 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway com~.er.ted on 16 Sep. on tne over- 
crowded conditions in the harbor of Kirkenes; he referred in this 
connection to tne Puebrer's directive to tne Snipping and Transport 
Brancn of tne Naval Stair Quartermaster Division, which was trans- 
mitted orally, on tne basis of wnicn tne naval of I ices had stooped 
larger steamers from proceeding to Petsamo. The Naval Staff con- 
firms tne view of tne Commanding Admiral, Norway tnat the quoted , 
Fuehrer directive applied exclusively to the period of tne arctic 
summer nignts. Cnce darkness sets in, tnere is no reason wny large 
steamers snould not call at Petsamo. In view of overcrowded con- 
ditions at Kirkenes and considering the delay caused by overland 
transports, attempts snould be made to 6end also convoys of large 
vessels directly to Petsamo. Tne Commanding Admiral, Norway is 
asked to investigate now tne situation mignt be relieved and to 
report nis findings. (See Telegram 1634.) 

3. Arctic Ocean ; 

a. Operation against Pa 18 : 

Tne Air Force reported convoy PC; 18 at tne White 
Sea entrance at 1000. Tne 5th Air Force reported sinking 6 
merchant vessels aggregating 46,000 GRT and 1 escort vessel; 
procably 6unk were a mercnant ships totalling 15,000 GRT. 5 
merchant snips and 1 destroyer were damaged. Prior to tne attacks 
the oonvoy consisted of between 49 and 53 ships; following the 
attacks there re-air^ed 40 to 43 ships including escort and patrol 
vessels, about whicn detailed information could not be obtained 
due to bad weather. 

b. Operation against convoy CJ* 14 : 

Air reconnaissance reports convoy ^P 14 in quadrant 
AB 1535 at 1057. Submarine U M 405" assumed the convoy was in 
quadrant AC 5030, proceeding on a course of 280° at 2037. Ac- 
cording to air reconnaissance reports, convoy ^P 14 is neavily 
protected by an aircraft carrier ani by escort vepsels; tnis 
convoy is escorted as neavily proportionately as PC. 18. The 
Admiral, Arctic Ocean therefore considers the prospects for suc- 
cessful suo.marine operations poor and orders tae submarines to 
leave tne patrol line between AC 3171 and AC 2444 at maximum 
cruising speed, pointing out tnat tne submarines snould aim primarily 
at maintaining contact with the convoy in order to assist tne Air 
Force, and at sinking damaged snips, since QP 14 is less valuable 
tnan PC. 18. 

Since all submarines nave been engaged against 
C^P 14 since 17 Sep. the Naval Staff questions tne 
advisability of tnese instructions. 



_212- B-1052 



- 



: 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

Submarine U "405" ie ordered to return to base on account of damages 
sustained through depth charges. 

c. Group North suggests withholding publication of the 
results achieved against PQ 18, because the reports on hand by 
evening of 17 Sep. indicate that, inclusive of 5 sinkings by sub- 
marines, a total of only 15 merchant vessels is missing from the 
convoy due to damage or sinking. The Group recommends postponing 

an announcement until the operations against $P 14 are concluded too. 

d. Mine-laying mission of submarine U "117" : 

Group North submits the directive for the execution 
of the mine-laying mission off Iceland by submarine U "117", in 
accordance with the Naval Staff's decision (see War Diary 16 Sep.). 
The submarine will sail from Kiel on 19 Sep. and proceed from 
Kristiansand South to quadrant AE 5300 to carry out her task. She 
will then return to Bergen and await further instructions. 

Group North anticipates particularly good results if submarine 
U "117", after completing her Iceland mission, would, shortly before 
P^ 19 gets under way, lay her entire supply of mines (with timing 
device set for a brief period) over a wide area where it would not 
interfere with submarine attacks; this would be within a radius of 
100 miles of the White Sea entrance or Kola Bay. "The chances of 
success are all the greater, as this would constitute the first in- 
stance of a purely tactical minefield." It will be possible to lay 
the mines if they are laid just within sight of remote escorts and 
are adjusted to become active after 30 minutes at the latest. The 
GrouD therefore proposes that submarine U "117" or a boat of the 
same type be assigned to this operation, because the exoeriences 
had with PQ 18 have shown that it is necessary to find new ways of 
combatting convoys. 

Group North reports that the area between 66° N and 64° 30' N and 
west of 11° 30' W is closed to shipping as of 35 Sep. because of the 
mine-laying operation to be carried out in the Iceland area. Only 
naval forces which will be in the Iceland area are to be notified 
of this fact. It is not to be entered into the charts of naval 
forces. (See Telegram 1511.) 



IV. Skagerrak. Baltic Sea Entrances. Baltic Sea 

Nothing of importance to reoort from the area of the Commanding 
Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea. 

Continuous bad weather interfered with patrol and mine-sweeping 
operations in the Gulf of Finland. 

With reference to the proposal of the Naval Liaison Staff, Finland, 
Group North requests permission to have the coastal mine vessels 
and Italian subchasers returned to the Gulf of Finland before the 
Saima Canal and Lake Ladoga freeze; they should operate in the 
Gulf of Finland as long as the ice situation permits. It is sug- 
gested that the ships remain at Reval for the winter. (See Telegram 
1155.) 



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8-1052 



C OSTITES TIAL 



18 Sep. 1942 



Group Nortn ordered that the Gulf of Bothnia be reopened to shipping 
at once and tnat shipping be directed to proceed either In Swedish 
or Finnish territorial waters (see Telegraa ?335) ; this order causes 
the Naval Staff to point out, with reference to the directive of 
17 Sep., tnat tne instructions to remain within territorial waters 
or within tne Finnish inter-island routes greatly complicate ore 
shipping, and tnat this order must be cancelled immediately. (See 
War Diary 17 Sep. ) 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Lively reoonnaissance activity in the rendezvous area and 
in the Bay of Biscay. At 1430 a submarine was attacked by aircraft 
south of tne Faeroe Islands. 'd submarine warning signals were 
intercepted in tne Bay of Biscay. 

In tne afternoon a convoy sailed from Gibraltar in a westerly 
direction. On 12 Sep. a*convoy of 24 steamers with troops on board 
left New York for tne Eritisn Isles under heavy escort. 

A message about a submarine attack iras intercepted from the area 
east of the Orinoco River mouth and 3 submarine warning signals fro-, 
the U.S. eaBt coast and off Trinidad. 

2. Own Situation : 

For operation against convoys P^ 18 and ^P 14 see Own 
Situation, Arctio Ocean. 

Submarine U "620", U "253" and U "610", en route from the North Sea, 
are assigned to quadrants AL 32, 34 and 35 resoectively where they 
are to intercept the escort forces returning from convoy duty In the 
Arctic Ocean. 

An enemy submarine was observed beyond any doubt in quadrant BE 9895, 

Since 1750 several submarines of Group "Loss"' established contact 
with a convoy proceeding on a northeasterly course in quadrant 
AJ 9187; the operation is still In progress. 

Nothing to report about Groups "Vorwaerts" and "Pfeil". 

From the St. Lawrence River submarine "517" reports sinking a 
British auxiliary warship of 3,500 tons in quadrant BA 3911 on 
11 8ep. and a 5,000 GRT steamer out of a large convoy in quadrant 
BB 1763 on 15 Sep. Several submarines observed convoy traffio 
running on a regular schedule on the St. Lawrence River and 
recommend simultaneous operations of a number of submarines. 

Submarines operating in the West Indies had no successes to report. 

Neither were reports of importance received from the South Atlantic 
(Groups "Eisbaer" and "litis") or the Mediterranean. 



-214- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

The rescue action for survivors of the LACONIA can be considered 
terminated. All survivors Dieked up by submarines U "506" and 
U "507" have been transferred to the dispatcn vessel ANNAMITE. As 
reported by tne German Armistice Commission, the GLOIRE has taken 
aboard from 12 lifeboats survivors which were picked up upon in- 
formation supplied by the German submarines. The French vessels are 
continuing the searcn an I request to be advised about any reoorts 
received from German submarines. 

For additional reports see supplement to submarine situation in War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 

Special Item ; 

Group North assumes from a report of the Mining and Barrage In- 
spectorate that mine-laying submarines can be supplied with SUA 
mines only at Peyse, so that SLLA operations cannot be carried out 
from Norway or from Atlantic ports. (See Telegram 2347.) 

An explanation of the Mining and Barrage Inspectorate must be 
awaited. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

During reconnaissance flights and attacks on ships off 
Dartmouth a 1,500 GRT steamer was sunk and other ships damaged. 

2. Incursions : 

During the afternoon tne enemy raided Belgium and northern 
France. 80 of the 140 reported enemy planes penetrated into German 
territory during the nignt of 18 Sep. A large-scale mine-laying 
operation was evidently carried out in the ^eser River mouth, the 
Baltic Sea entrances and in tne Baltic Sea area from Fehmarn Island 
to Pillau. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

German air forces flew a total of 228 sorties. Gialo 
oasis was attacked by w5 enemy planes. 

4. Eastern Front : 

97 enemy planes were snot down at tne various Army fronts. 

A survey of the number of German and enemy missions flown during 
the period of 5 to 12 Sep. indicates the relative strength of 
the opposing air forces: 



-215- 



B-105? 



CONFIDENTIAL 



15 Sep. 1942 



1st Air Force: 2,996 sorties 2,125 enemy sorties 

4tn Air Force: 7,507 sorties 2,834 enemy sorties 

Tne Air Force Commands, 

East ani Don River: 4.665 sorties 5.585 enemy sorties 

Total 15.168 10.545 

Reconnaissance activity over tne Black Sea and Caspian Sea. 

In tne Arctic Ccean 2 motor launches in Litovska Bay were da-caged, 

Regarding operations against convoys P^ 18 and ^P 14 see Own 
Situation, Arctic Ocean. 



VII. Warfare in tne Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, "editerranean : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situatio n, -edit erranean : 

Enemy air raids on Tobruk during the nignts of 15 and 
17 Sep. caused little damage in tne narbor. 

At noon on 17 Sep. a coastal steamer and an auxiliary sailing 
vessel were attacked unsuccessfully by a submarine witn torpedoes 
and gunfire off Jape liisurata. 

The German naval 2ora-:ana., Italy a-oroves of tne plan of tne Com- 
mander, 6th Motor Mine Sweeper Flotilla to use captured Britisn 
PT boats. The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division agrees. 

An Italian description of tne enemy attack on Tobruk during the 
nignt of 13 Sep. is contained in the a-rpendix to Foreign Press 
Report No. 219 of tne Naval Intelligence Division. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

Steamer CaRBONIA (1,237 GRT) was sunk, probably by air 
attack, on 17 Sep. in tne Gulf of Hammamet wnile proceeding from 
Naples to Tripoli. 560 tons of German supplies and 4 guns were 
lost. 

During tne ni?nt of 17 Sen. enemy planes attackei tne steamers 
NERUCCI and FOUGIER between Suda and Tobruk. (See Tar Diary 
17 Sep.) wo details nave been reported as yet. 

1 Italian transport submarine nas been unier way since 17 Sep. 
from Tripoli to Taranto and another one from Benghazi to Taranto. 

8upply transport from Greece to North Africa and coastal supply 
traffic proceeded according to plan. 



-216- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

4. Area Naval Group South ; 

Aegean Sea ; 

Nothing to report. Convoy and transport service on 
sohedule. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Air reconnaissance spotted a convoy consisting of 2 small 
tankers on a west-northwesterly course south of Sukhum. 

Own Situation ; 

Since enemy shipping along the Caucasian coast is evidently 
proceeding in daytime only, our PT boats and tne Italian subchasers 
operate only if warranted reconnaissance reports. 

2 more motor mine sweepers were damaged during tne air raid on 
Keren of IV Sep. Anotner air attack took place in tne evening of 
17 Sep. 4 of tne 10 bomos dropped fell in the harbor. 

In connection with operation "Bluecner" a total of 30,605 men, 
13,;d54 norseB, ana 6,^65 venicles were ferried up to 16 Sep. 

Convoy service proceeded uneventfully. Transport vehicles for 
carrying Italian subenasers overland to tne Casoian Sea are ex- 
pected to arrive at Mariupol on 30 Sep. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 

The Japanese Navy informed the German Admiral at Tokyo that a 
large U.S. aircraft carrier was hit by 4 torpedoes from a suomarine 
200 miles southeast of Guadalcanal on lb Sep., and sank 2 hours 
later according to allegedly uncontestaole eye witness accounts. 

Japanese forces are slowly gaining ground in bitter fignting on 
Guadalcanal. Tne airfield is still in enemy nands. Enemy reports 
of Japanese ships sunk are denied. Japanese ships suffered only 
minor damage. 

An intelligence report from Cnina, dated 4 Sep., states that tne 
rumors*" about an ofrensive against Russia nave died down. Feverish 
activity reigns in military circles. Continuous troop movements 
are explained as operations to relieve personnel. 

The U.S. Navy Department announced tnat 4 enemy mercnant vessels 
were newly sunk and 4 otners damaged Dy U.S. submarines in Far 
Eastern waters. Tne total of Japanese ships sunk or damaged 
(probably warships and merchant vessels) by U.S. naval and air 
forces is given as 272 as against 53 U.S. ships. 



_217- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
18 Sep. 1942 

IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A ; 

At the Terek sector ea6t of Maisky the 13th Panzer 
Division succeeded in capturing strongly-fortif i v ed enemy positions 
against stubborn defense. 

Army Group B : 

At Stalingrad the 94th Infantry Division reached the 
Volga bank on a narrov front after bitter house-to-house fighting 
south of tne Tsaritsa River. Nortn of the river, the 71st Infantry 
Division mopped up the western part of the town as far as the rail- 
road. 

Strong enemy tank forces broke tnrough tne strip of land along the 
railroad souih of Kotluban with 3 regiments and advanced as far as 
Borodkin. The situation was restored by a counterattack. 

Following preparations by an artillery barrage, several enemy 
divisions launched a strong concentric, bomber-supported attack at 
Voronezh from the south, east, and north, wnich was repulsed by 
drawing on all available reserves. Heavy fighting is still in 
progress at the eastern end of the town. 

Central Army Group : 

Enemy attacks at Novosil and Sychevka, too, were repulsed. 
North of Smolensk our forces advanced in a westerly direction and 
captured a .number of villages. 

Northern Army Group ; 

The enemy attacked unsuccessfully at the Demyansk sector 
and north of the strip of land leading to the II Army Corps. Fight- 
ing south of Lake Ladoga is still in progress. An attempt of 2 
barges to land on tne eastern bank of the Neva was frustrated, 

2. Finnish Front : 

Fighting is still going on south of Seg Lake. 

3. North Africa : 

Gialo oasis is still holding out. Motorized enemy forces 
south of the oasis were attacked by German and Italian planes. 



-218- B - 1052 



COireiSEKTIAL 
19 Sep. 19^2 ' 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain ; 

London and Washington are tensely watching the final phase of the 
battle for Stalingrad. It is feared that the fall of the city 
might be the signal for a Japanese attack on Russia, just as the 
fall of Paris was the signal for Italy*s entry into the war. 

Argentina ; 

The Transocean News Agency reports that the committee investigating 
anti -Argentine activities resolved on 17 Sep. to reco-mnend that 
the Chamber announce it would like the Government to declare the 
German Naval Attache, Captain Niebuhr persona non grata . In 
addition, the finding 3 concerning the escaped crew members of 
the GRAF SPEE are to be turned over to the courts. 

Russia: 

On 17 Sep. Willkie arrived at Kuibyshev from Teheran. 

Croatia: 

Foreign reports assert that heavy fighting has broken out in 
western Bosnia between Croatian regular forces and rebel partisans 
of General Mikhailovich. 



Special Items : 

I. On 9 and' 10 Sep. the Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff 
visited the Army General Staff, the Air Force General Staff and 
the Operations Staff of the Armed Forces High Command. 

For transcriptions of his conferences see l/Skl I8L1.3/I4.2 Gkdos. 
Chefs. Copy No. 2 in War Diary, Parte, files "Basic Problems 
of Warfare "• 

II. Evaluation of materiel captured with motor gunboat "335" on 
" 11 Sep. in the Channel by the 2nd PT Boat Flotilla, as submitted 

by the Chief, Communications Division, Naval Staff 1 

(a) 1 Syko machine (known before). 

(b) Cypher tables of the Loxo, Syko, and Nyko systems valid 
for September. These tables are very valuable for deciphering, 
especially for the Syko system. 

(c) Instructions for the British radio system (home territory) 
provide new information; for instance cover names used for convoy?. 

(d) International call letters of merchant vessels. 

(e) Signal code no. 2 for auxiliary vessels, which was 
previously unknown. 

.(f) 3 charts for the Hoof den area containing valuable in- 
formation on minefields. 



-219- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
1Q Sep. 19U2 

(g) 7 pieces of radio equipment. 

(h) 1 ca£e containing star signal shells. 

III. The i*aval Staff Quartermaster division is requested to invest- 
igate the possibility of converting naval barges for the transport 
of fuel. These are needed for: 

(a) The transport of fuel for the Army and the Air Force 
(to be unloaded at open coasts and in harbors). 

(b) The delivery of fuel to submarines at sea (advanced sub- 
marine bases, for instance in the Norwegian island waters) > 

IV. For the directive of the Naval Ordnance Division, War Economy 
Branch of 19 Sep. regarding delivery of materiel to our allies , 
in order to maintain their fighting power see l/skl 3187O/I4.2 geh. 
in War Diary, Part B, Vol. V. 

V. Data furnished by the Naval Staff, Intelligence Division 
about the enemy situation in Russia contain information on the 
following 1 

(a) The use of Allied forces in the Russian area. 

(b) The creation of ruard units within the Red Army. 

(c) Markings of warships. 

For copy of information see l/Skl 3I9C2A2 geh. in War Diary, 
file "Barbarossa". 



Situation 19 Sep. 19I4.2 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

An intelligence report contains statements dated 28 Aug. 
of a British naval officer, according to which large numbers of 
British, Canadian, and U.S. troops are to be shipped to the Middle 
East, Egypt, and the Caucasus. A large convoy, said to consist 
of approximately 70 steamers lying at Scotch harbors, is supposed 
to sail shortly with approximately 200,000 men and full war equip- 
ment; it will be escorted by 2 large aircraft carriers, 2 battle- 
ships, a number of cruisers and destroyers, and numerous PT boats 
which are to be kept supplied by a tender sailing in the convoy. 
Additional vessels with troops and war material from the U.S.A. 
will join this convoy at Capetown. 

2. Own Situation : 

At I7I7 ship "10" reported by short signal: "22 Sep., 
rendezvous point "Altmuehl"; 25 Sep., have reached ordered position" 

The Naval Staff confirms receipt of message by Radiogram 20U2. 

The following directive is transmitted to ship "23" and UCKERMARK 



-220- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



19 Sep. 19J+2 



by radiogram I718: 

a* Rendezvous at point "Schumann" is planned on or after 
28 Sep. 

b. Out of the supplies for ship "10" carried by the UCKER- 
MARK, all of the provisions and the entire camouflage material may 
be delivered to ship "23", All other supplies must be retained for 
delivery to ship "10". The UCKERMARK to deliver any oil. 

c. On 29 Aug. ship "28" reported by short signal: "Fuel 
will last until 6 Dec." According to the Naval Staff's calculations 
her fuel supply should last considerably longer. The Naval Staff 
assumes that the ship's endurance does not go beyond 6 Dec. due to 
lack of provisions, water, or coal. 

d. Following the rendezvous with UCKERMARK another report 
concerning endurance is to be transmitted when convenient. 

e. Subsequent to the completion of her supply mission, the 
UCKERMARK is to proceed to Japan, rounding the Cape of Good Hope 
at a latitude 9° south of point "Amiens". 

The following directive of the Naval Staff is transmitted to the 
CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN by Radiogram O305: 

a. The order to call at Medan is cancelled. Instead, the 
ship is to proceed to Singapore by way of Karimata Strait. Instruct- 
ions regarding rendezvous with Japanese forces will f ollowo 

b. 50 war prisoners are to be handed over at Singapore 
and JO German seamen to be taken aboard and brought to Japan. 
Prisoners to be handed over should be those unsuitable for 
questioning. 

c. As much oil for the Japanese Navy as possible is to be 
taken on at Singapore, whereupon the ship is to proceed directly 
to Japan. It is likely that 250 tons of Tarakan oil will be 
received for German test purposes. Instructions regarding this 
matter will come from the Naval Attache at Tokyo. All fuel 
problems to be settled directly between the captain and the Japanese 
naval authority at Singapore. 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo transmits sailing instructions for the 
CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN 's call at Singapore by Telegram II4.36. 

All ships in foreign waters are informed about the extension of 
the zone of submarine operations off West Africa by Radiogram 2257 • 

Information about the meeting between Churchill and Stalin at 
Moscow, about Mllkio's trip to Ankara, and about the Madagascar 
situation by Radiogram 1223. 



II. Situation West Area 



1. Enemy Situation : 

Between 11 and 13 Sep. French fisherman 180 miles 



-221- 



8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
19 Sep. 1QJ+2 

west of Brest were ordered by British destroyers and patrol vessels 
to proceed and put into Scilly Islands ports, 3 trawlers obeyed 
the order. One man from each of 2 other boats were taken off as 
hostages. 

According to a press report from La Linea , the British seized 3 
Spanish steamers and brought thein to Gibraltar. 

Commenting on the Dieppe landing operation, the Canadian Defense 
Minister asserted that a chance encounter and unforeseen engage- 
ment with an escorted German tanker were to blame for the fact 
that the raid did not come as a complete surprise to the enemy. 
"This engagement is responsible for the heavy losses suffered by 
the Canadians, which amount to a total of 3,350 dead, wounded 
and missing". 

The complete text is contained in appendix I of Foreign Press 
Report No. 220 of the Naval Staff Intelligence Division. 

2# Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast ; 

Due to the presence of aerial mines, the harbor and road- 
stead of La Pallice were closed. A dredge sank in cayonne harbor 
after striking a mine. 

The Naval Attache at Madrid pointed out that it would be better if 
outgoing blockade-runners did not follow the Spanish coast line 
in order to avoid giving the British an excuse for protests against 
the use of Spanish territorial waters. 

The Naval Staff informs Group West of the above. 

Channel Coast ; 

Execution of mine-laying operation "Elbe" was postponed 
2I4. hours. 

Special Items ; 

On IJ4 Sep. 19^2 Group West submitted a brief memorandum to the 
Commanding General, Armed Forces, West and the J>r& Air Force, 
with copies to the Naval Staff and other authorities, concerning 
the possibilities for the use of naval forces in the event of 
enemy landings • 

For copy see l/Skl 1832/42 Gkdos. Chefs. In War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. II b. 

The "ftaval Staff cannot agree with Group West's memorandum in its 
present form. The definitely existing possibilities for successful 
Intervention by naval forces in repelling enemy landing attempts- 
are not sufficiently brought out. In the Naval Staff's opinion, 
Group West's memorandum is poorly expressed, In that it emphasizes 
difficulties in the use of naval forces and does not mention the 
natural willingness of the Navy to use all possible resources also 
in the event of an invasion. Thus, authorities other than naval, 
as for instance the Commanding General, Armed Forces West, can 
easily receive an erroneous impression. 



B-1052 



-222- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



19 Sep. 19U2 



That this is actually the case is evident by the reaction of the 
Commanding General, Armed forces, West, who states that we cannot 
do completely without naval forces in case of an invasion, lest 
the enemy have undisputed control at sea; the intercession of even 
the weakest naval force, even though remote or directed against 
the enemy's supply lines only, would suffice to divert some of hia 
forces. Any sort of interference with the enemy's plans would havfc 
some effect. The Commanding General, Armed Forces, West informs 
Group West of this viewpoint and refers to his complete agreement 
with the attitude of Group North. 

The Naval Staff's comment is transmitted to Group West by Telegram 
1/Skl I op I832/I4.2 Gkdos. Chefs. For copy of directive and 
communication of the Commanding General, Armed Forces, West to 
Group West see 1/Skl \b^Z/l\Z Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. lib. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

There was little reconnaissance activity over the 
central North Sea. After ll|20 a few planes flew over the Dutch 
and East Frisian area, after I63O also over the German bight as 
far as Heligoland. 

Own Situation ; 

During the night of 18 Sep. enemy planes flew over 
the Dutch coast and the coastal areas of the German Bight. It 
was observed that mines were dropped at Ameland, and probably they 
were also dropped at other East and West Frisian Islands. In 
addition, considerable air forces crossed Germany for mine-laying 
operations in the Baltic Sea. 

7 ground mines were swept on the convoy route between Terschelling 
and Borkum. A convoy off Schiermonnikoog was unsuccessfully 
attacked with bombs. 

MInesweeping operations were affected In part by bad weather. 
Convoy service suffered delays. 

2. Norway ; 

A Russian battery on Rybachi Peninsula fired a few 
rounds at OH5 at an eastbound convoy and at Olj.25 shelled Petsamo 
harbor. Enemy planes were active over the arctic coast on II4., 
17 and 18 Sep. It Is probable that they were reconnoitering the 
ship anchorages in the Bogen Bay. Cn 18 Sep. enemy planes flew 
over the west coast. On 19 Sep. 6 guns of battery Eltevik went 
out of commission; it will take several days to repair them. 

Special Items ; 

Since experience has shown that the Arctic Ocean is the area In 
which the heavy ships can operate and repel enemy landings most prp- 
fitably the Naval Staff considers that Alta Fjord is the most favorable 



-225- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



19 Sep. 19i|2 



main base for them and invites the comment of Group North and the 
Fleet Command. For copy of directive to this effect see l/Skl 
I op I8J49/I4.2 Gkdos. Chefs, in 'war Diary, Part C, Vol. II a. 

3« Arctic Ocean ; 

a. Operation against PQ 18 : 

Air reconnaissance sighted convoy P^ 18 at 1530 at 
the northeastern entrance of Dvina Bay. It is expected to reach 
Archangel around 2230. Final reports about the number of ships still 
In the convoy have not yet been received, or have not yet been 
evaluated. 

The Admiral, Arctic Ocean submits a short report, subject to 
final information following the return of the submarines, and 
arrives at the following conclusions: 

Decisive results against convoys protected by very strong escorts 
can be achieved with submarines only if the convoy is split up, 
for Instance through aerial attack. To this end the aircraft 
carrier was designated to tiie submarines as their most important 
targets so as to facilitate aerial attacks and to achieve results 
by combined attacks from both branches of the Armed Forces. In 
this we failed. As long as a convoy constitutes a solid formation 
with adequate remote and close escort and air protection it will 
rarely be possible to break through the protective forces un- 
detected during the period of short nights and corresponding high 
visibility. It is difficult to contact the actual convoy on 
account of air and remote escorts; contact can be maintained only 
with the escort. Usually attacks have to be made from in front 
of the convoy from prepared positions In deep formation. It is 
possible to place submarines in such positions only with constant 
plane contact and with particularly good night communications. 
None of these prerequisites existed due to bad weather and magnetic 
disturbances of radio communication. As long as our air forces 
attack, our submarines must keep at a distance; our air attacks 
therefore are unfavorable for the effectiveness of submarine 
operations against convoys, except against damaged stragglers, as 
long as the convoy is not split up. The closest cooperation with 
the Air Force is therefore of paramount importance. Despite the 
greater number of submarines engaged, their achievements did not 
match those attained against PQ 17 because the effectiveness of 
the Air Force was hampered by the presence of an aircraft carrier 
and by nightfall and bad weather. 



A 
Is 



final check of all reconnaissance data (Air Commander, Lofoten 
-lands) shows that convoy PQ, 16, prior to the actual start of 
operations, consisted of 4.5 or probably more merchant vessels, 
1 aircraft carrier, approximately 20 destroyers and escort vessels, 
and 1 light cruiser. 

As many as 12 submarines were committed against PQ. 18. 

Results ; h steamers (2l|.,000 GRT) sunk, 1 probably sunk, 1 hit on 
an AFRIDI-class destroyer, 2 probable hits on steamers, 2 probable 
hits on a JAVELIN -class destroyer. 

Losses ; 3 submarines have not been heard from for the past few 
days ; these may be lost (U "88", Captain Bohmann; U "I4.57" Captain 
Brandenburg; U "589" Captain Horrer). Submarines U H 251 n , U "255", 



**** B " 1052 

-224- 



CONFIDENTIAL 

19 Sep. 19U2 

1 
U "I4.O3" and U "i+O^ " were damaged by depth charges. 

For copy of telegram, see l/Skl 23326 f\\2 Gkdos. In file "Eispalast' 1 . 

On the basis of reports from the 5 ttl Air Force received by the 
Naval Staff between 13 and 19 Sep. I9I+2, the Air Force definitely 
sank 16 and probably b merchant vessels on 13 and II4. Sep., and 
sank 6 and probably 2 on lb Sep. According to this a total of 26 
merchant vessels wer'e sunk definitely and 9 probably, out of the 
convoy which was estimated by the Air Commander, Lofoten Islands 
on 13 Sep. as consisting of 45 merchant vessels. However, on 
17 Sep. convoy PQ 18 was repeatedly reported as proceeding in 
close formation consisting of 30 merchant vessels. It remains 
to be seen what the final report of the Air Force will be after 
a final check of its reported successes. 

b« Operation against ffi I4 : 

Contact was established at 0120 in quadrant AC li+29 by 
submarine U "I4.35"* but was lost a few hours later due to a snow 
storm coming from the north. At 0348 submarine U "4O3" attacked 
a submarine decoy in quadrant AC 1183 with a four-fan. 

10 submarines tried all day to reestablish contact west of the 
Bear Island-Spitsbergen line, and at 2120 submarine U "606" finally 
succeeded. The convoy was then proceeding on a 315° course, 5 sub- 
marines were ordered into position in patrol line from quadrant 
AS 7757 to quadrant AB 2218 for 0600 on 20 Sep. 

As reported by the Mr Force, QP.I4 consists of approximately 

20 merchant vessels with an escort of 1 aircraft carrier, 3 heavy 
cruisers, and 23 destroyers and escort vessels, proceeding at 

9 knots. 

* 

c. Mine -laying operation in the Iceland area : 

Group North submitted an excerpt from the operations 
order issued to submarine U "117"» The operation carries the 
code name "John Bull n # 11 mine patches of 6 SMA mines each, 
2 miles long, will be laid in the area between 66° N and 61+° 30' N * 
west of llo 30* W; particular attention is to be given to the 
areas off Reldar and Seydis Fjords. According to the written order, 
the commander in charge of the operation may, at his discretion, 
deviate from these instructions by laying the minefields further 
out to sea or by changing the time of the execution of the order 
if necessary due to strong enemy patrol activity. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

A surprise large-scale aerial mine offensive was carried out 
by the enemy during the night of 18 Sep. In the Baltic Sea entrances 
and In the Baltic Sea as far east as the Bay of Danzig. 2 planes 
were shot down. 

The Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea assumes that besides 
in the Great Belt, many mines were laid off the eastern Jutland 
coast extending to 11° E from the latitude of Fornaes to the 
latitude of Skagen. In addition, ground .mines were laid in a 



-225- 



B-105 2 



S'TIAL 



15 Sep. 1 



strip of 20 miles off the coart from Skagen to Hirtshals. German 
stea-e: s ot served 5 enemy plenes dropping aerial mines north off 
Grenaa. 2 ground mines were swept in the cay of Danzig, a third 
one en the ferry route from Helsinroer to Helsingborg. A Danish 
patrol cutter sank in the Sound, and the Danish steamer ASTKLD 
sank south of the anti-aircraft hattery at Cestrem, both after 
striking a mine. Suczrarine U "1+15 " reported the explosion of 5 
aerial nines close to the boat on the shipping lane from Kela 
to Sdynia off Gdynia. Submarine U "227" reported 6 detonations 
while proceeding from Gdynia to Roenne approach buoy, resulting 
... the failrre of both Diesels and a battery. In both these 
cases acoustic mines are suspected. Several British aerial 
mines were also observed near the Swedish border at Irelleborg 
and Naval Station, Baltic considers it advisable to suggest to 
Sweden that she keep the ferry route from "Gruen 05" to Trelleborg, 
wnich is used by Swedish traffic, constantly swept. (See Telegram 
1322.) 

Group North has not yet B omen ted on the new mine situation In 
the Baltic Sea. 

Mine-sweeping in the area of the Corasanier, Mine Sweepers, Baltic 
Sea was strongly affected by bad weather'." Convoy service proceeded 

according to plan. 

The Naval Representative at the Armed Forces Intelligence division 
Espionage Branch reports in connection with operation "Kiabautermann" 
that 2 groups of agents were landed near Leningrad during the night 
of II4. Sep. according to plan* The landing was effected with Italian 
subchasers at Toserovo ( 15 km south 01 the front on the western shore 
of lake Ladoga) • 

The Naval Staff notifies the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High 
Command of the following (with copies to Vice Admiral Krancke 
and Group North): 

a. Operations of coastal mine vessels and Italian sub- 
chasers on Lake Ladoga will cease around the middle of October 
on account of ice conditions. 

b. The Naval Stsff plans to transfer these ships to the 
Gulf of Finland by 10 Oct. at the latest, where they will be used 
as long as ice .conditions permit} thereafter they will spend the 
winter and be -overhauled for next year's operations at Reval. 

c. The Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command Is 
requested to give its consent to item b. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

According to an intelligence report of 17 Sep., Argentina 
and Chile agreed to lease 3/4 °f their merchant tonnage, i.e. 
approximately 500,000 tons, (it is not clear whether this figure 
refers to GRT or deadweight) to the U.S.A. In view of the 
requirements of the two countries, the Naval Staff Intelligence 
Division, Foreign Merchant Marine Branch considers this report 
untrue. 



B-1052 

-226- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



19 Sep. 19^2 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

Lively reconnaissance activity In the southern rendez- 
vous area. 

Radio monitoring intercepted a report about the torpedoing of 
the U.S. tanker EETROPUEL ( 7,29U GRT) east of Cape Charles. Sub- 
marine warning signals were flashed off Cape Hatteras and In the 
waters off Trinidad. 

2. Own Situation : 

2 submarines are under way to the zone of operations 
from German and 3 from western French ports. 

Regarding operations against QJP li|. see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

In the North Atlantic contact with the convoy headed northeast 
was reestablished in quadrant AJ 6656 by Group "Loss". Another 
convoy was spotted in the same area on a westerly course at 2300. 
The Group was ordered nevertheless to continue operations against 
the first one. No reports of successes have come in as yet. 

One of the Group's submarines was rammed while making an underwater 
attack, but suffered no important damage and continues in operation. 

Nothing to report from the other groups and single boats operating 
in the North Atlantic. 

No success reports from the submarines off the American east coast. 
Submarine U "I75" sank a 3,000 GRT tanker in the West Indies 
in quadrant E0 1815 and encountered a submarine decoy ship in 
quadrant E0 l8l6. 

Submarine U "516" reports sinking a single ship estimated at 6,000 
GRT in quadrant EE 751+lw 

Submarine U "I56" of the South Atlantic Group sank the l+,750 GRT 
steamer QUEBEC CITY off Freetown. Submarine U "109" discovered 
secret sailing instructions to Freetown, Lagos and Takoradi which 
were in the possession of the captain of the sunken steamer PETERT0N. 
The harbor of Freetown is protected by a boom barrage but is accessible 
day and night. Lagos, is closed at night. 

Submarine U "375" sank a 1,200 GRT steamer and i| sailing vessels 
in the Mediterranean. 

For further reports see supplement to subinarine situation in War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 

The German Armistice Commission was notified by the French that 
the cruiser GL0IRE, after taking over survivors picked up by 
other ships, has 335 Italians, b61| British on board, including 10 
women and children. Additional survivors are still aboard an 
Italian submarine and will be taken over by a French dispatch 
vessel on 20 or 21 Sep. (See Telegram 2035.) 

Special Items ; 

b. ^ Telegr am i/SklrT u lO ^l/frg-Gkdus . Che fs , the Commanding 



-227- 



B-1052 



confidential 



19 Sep. 19I4.2 



Admiral, Submarines is directed to order 6 additional submarines 
to the Mediterranean, wheve they will be at the disposal of the 
Commander, Submarines, Italy during t\ e coming new moon period. 
Copy of directive is contained in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV. 

b. The Comnanding Admiral, Submarines submits the requested 
report on his plans for the use of mine-laying sut-.arines suitable 
for carrying SMA mines. Their greater operating range permits 
exploitation of the possibilities on the American and African 
coasts. In addition, it will be possible to execute occasional 
missions in the waters of Iceland and the British Isles without too 
much waste of time. The Commanding Adnlral, Submarines leaves 
it to the commands involved to judge the conditions for use in 
the Arctic Ocean. 

The following areas along the U.S. coasts may be considered: 

(1) The waters between Boston and Cape Sable, the areas 
off Halifax, off Sydney, off Cape Race, off St. Johns, 
where mines may be laid without interfering with 
normal submarine operations. 

(2) The Mississippi River estuary. 

(3) Cabot Strait, St. Lawrence River, Strait of belle Isles, 
the Old Bahama Channel, the vicinity of Trinidad. 

The areas mentioned under (2) and (3) will have to be reserved 
for the time being exclusively to toroedo-submarines. 

Along the African coast the following areas may be considered: 

(1) Off Durban, East London, Port Elizabeth, Capetown. 

(2) In the Gulf of Guinea, off the Congo coast, Pointe 
^oire, Libreville, Lagos, Takoradi. 

(3) Less favorable are Bathurst, Freetown, Monrovia, as well 
as Duala, Port Harcourt, Calabar. In the latter areas 

if necessary Spanish traffic to Fernando Po should be taken 
Into consideration. 

Aside from these purely geographical considerations, the use of ^. 

SUA mines will be determined by the traffic and defense situation. 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines figures that traffic will be 

heaviest and of greatest importance in American waters, these being 

the point of origin of the supply routes to the British Isles 

and Russia; by comparison, the volume of strategically important 

shipping around the Cape of Good Hope Is presumably considerably 

smaller. It Is more difficult to mine the routes to Freetown on 

account of the depths encountered tiiere. Traffic to the Guinea 

coast is of minor significance. A chance to establish the exact 

location of shipping routes by observation exists at few points 

only, since the distance from the coast is ordinarily too great. 

The execution of mine-laying operations in all of the areas men- 
tioned above is possible in spite of existing defenses. The 
enemy will be able to cope with mines more readily in the American 
than in the African area. Mine-laying operations will become 
more difficult with the further increase of submarine defenses 
In the American area. 

/ 

B-105 2 
-228- 



19 Sep. 19m 2 

Taking these conditions into account, the Commanding Admiral, 

Submarines suggests that the first mine-layin r o:« v :.t ions following 
the release of the 3.. .A mine should take place off the American 
co?st. In his opinion, the main objective, also of mine-laying 
operations, is to achieve immediate successes which besides sinkings 
also include the temporary blockin. of seaoorts. ihe orospect of 
splitting the enemy's defense forces and of spreading unrest in 
remote areas figures second in his considerations. 

The '.'aval Staff agrees on tti^ whole wi th the reasoning and the 
proposal of the Com.-r.andi no Admiral, iulnnrines in that, apart 
from Iceland, .the American area should be considered primarily. 
However, the South African ports should be included in these 
operations a3 soon as possible thereafter on account of the 
high strategical importance of shipping in this area. The fact 
that this will cause the enemy to Increase his mine defenses is of 
less importance in this area, because the enemy is already aware 
of the use of mines through his experiences with the DOOOSM.A 'K 
minefields. A final decision will be taken following further 
examination of the problem. 



VI 1. Aerial Warfare 

1. Erltlsh Isles and Vicinity : 

During the day our planes carried out reconnaissance 
flights and depth charge attacks at several coastal places* 

No reports were received as yet about our night operations. 

2. Incursions : 

l^O enemy planes penetrated into southwestern German 
territory. Their attack centered on l.lun.'ch. 12 planes were 
shot down. Considerable damage was wrought in the residential 
district and heavy damage to the industrial sector. Some damage 
was caused also at Saarbruecken. For details see daily situation 
report • 

3» Mediterranean Theater ; 

Nothing to report. 

i| • Eastern Fron t : 

At the various Army sectors a total of bl enemy planes 
were shot down. 

Lively shipping was observed on 18 Sep. on the Volga River between 
Astrakhan and Stalingrad. Regarding operations against convoys 
P^ 18 and Q? II4. see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 



-229- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
19 Sep. 191+2 

Vlil .Warfare In the Mediterranean and the i^lack Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

A total of 100 planes was observed in the harbor and on 
the airfield of Gibraltar. More and more planes are being stationed 
there. An Intelligence report of 18 Sep. states that patrol 
activity east of the Strait of Gibraltar has been increased. 

In the eastern i.lediterranean a cruiser escorted by 3 destroyers 
on a northerly course was spotted by Italian air reconnaissance . 
we-t of Haifa, and another cruiser with 2 destroyers on a south- 
southeasterly course, 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

The Italian cruiser EOLZANO which had been beached 
following a hit from an aerial torpedo on 13 Aug. was towed 
to Naples on 15 Sep. 

The Italian Arrned Forces High Command announced on 18 Sep. that 
assault boats of the Navy penetrated into the harbor of Gibraltar 
and sank the steamer RAVENS POINT. In a preceding engagement lj. 
identified and a 5th unidentified steamer were severely damaged 
by other assault boats in the Eay of Gibraltar. Most of the 
attacking boats returned to base. Details of this action are 
contained in supplement II of Foreign Press Report No. 220 by 
the Naval Intelligence division. 

The German Naval Command, Italy reports that detailed information 
about this operation is as yet not available from the Italian 
Naval High Command. 



V 



The Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command informed the 
Naval Staff that 6 more Italian torpedo boats are required to 
escort increased shipping to Crete. The Naval Staff is requested 
to make sure that these ships are supplied by the Italian Navy, the 
date to be fixed in consultation with the Admiral, Aegean Sea. 

The Naval Staff Informs the German Naval Command, Italy to this 
effect and orders it to support the demand of the Operations 
Staff, Armed Forces High Command at the Italian Naval High 
Command in consultation with the German General attached to 
Italian Armed Forces Headquarters, who received identical instructs 
ions from the Armed Forces High Command. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

The convoy comprising steamers NERUCCI , DORA and FOUGIER 
arrived at Tobruk on 18 Sep. The convoy consisting of motor ship 
MONGINEVRO and APUANIA was spotted by British reconnaissance on 
the way from Italy to Benghazi and attacked 90 miles west of Crete* 
Further information Is not yet available. 

1|. Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 



8-1052 

-23O- 



confidential 
19 Sep. 19I4.2 

black Sec, ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance observed slight traffic off the 
Caucasian coast during the -iay. 90 miles south-southwest of 
Tuapse a submarine was attacked by a plane, retails are still 
mi s 3 i ng • 

Own Situation : 

On 17 Sep. Yalta was attacked by enemy planes and 
balaklava on lo Sep., in the latter case by 6 planes carrying 
German identification markings. A naval barge burned up, one 
motor trawler was sunk and a tank lighter damaged. 

1 mine was swept on 17 Sep., a second on 16 Sep. by a mine- 
sweeping plane at the harbor entrance of Yeisk. It is necessary 
to have planes sweep the supply routes in the Sea of Azov. J4. 
naval barges arrived at Sulina from the Danube. Convoy traffic 
in the Black Sea and the Sea ov Azov proceeded uneventfully. 

Group South requests the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division to 
rush the transfer to the J^lack Sea of the promised i| aiditional 
motor mine sweepers as much as possible, since the demands on 
the 3 rci Kotor Wine Sweeper Flotilla are very great, and a 
number of Its ships have broken down. 

Russian air activity was greatly intensified during the last 
few days and resulted In successful attacks on the Crimean bases 
and transshipping places; these were carried out from altitudes 
which cannot be reached by light anti-aircraft artillery. As 
reported by Group South, the Air Commander, Crimea declared it 
Impossible to provide heavy anti-aircraft artillery and declined 
fighter protection for shipping in the Kerch Strait. Group 
South considers fighter protection in the Crimea as the minimum 
requirement and requests the Naval Staff to provide relief. 
(See Telegram I030.) 

The Naval Staff submitted the Group's request to the Commander 
in Chief, Air force, with copy to the Naval Representative 
on the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command, with the 
urgent request to grant these demands if at all possible. The 
Naval Staff used this opportunity to reemphasize the grave 
consequences for the conduct of the war of further losses of ship- 
ping space and escort forces. 



IX. Situation East Asia 

According to a compilation of the U.S. Naval High Command, 
the Japanese have thus far definitely lost 59 an d probably lost 
an additional 15 warships. 60 warships were damaged. 

These figures appear grossly exaggerated. 



-251- 



lc o ep . lci+2 

X. :..--.::- citation 

1. us^ian Front ; 

Arr.y C-rcup A : 

The *r& - £r - Mountain division is making a con- 

centric attack en Krivanskaya. The 5*d ?ar.:er Division rained 
ground in a westerly direction east of y.aisky. 

Ar.-.y :-roup Z ; 

PI 5 In Stalingrad continues. A new enemy art a 

sou - - ran is under way. Italian units west of Kazansk? 

foiled an enemy attempt to cress the Don River. A renewed attack 
north :; Voronezh was repulsed with heavy enemy losses. 

Central Arrr.y Sroup : 

South of hovosil the ener.y renewed his futile attacks. 
Several enemy thrusts in the Kzhev area were repulsed. 

Northern Army '3 roup : 

The enemy launched particularly strong attacks against 
our lines along the railroad in the northern Demyansk sector, 
all of which were completely repulsed. Renewed attacks supported 
by tanks, torxers and artillery are in progress. Unsuccessful 
attacks were launched also ncrth and south of the land bridge. Vie 
succeeded in. improving our position on the Redvya hiver and gained 
ground in a southerly direction south of Soltsy, Enemy attacks 
south of Lake > Ladoga were repulsed. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

foe my attacks in the haselskaya area were halted before 
ry could reach* our lines. The er.er.y is cringing up reinforce- 
ments and artillery. Increased Partisan activity la reported from 
Alakurtti area. 

3» Xcrth- Africa : 

reports received as yet. 



-252- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1943 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain : 

Lord Winster, an authority on snipping, stated in a newspaper 
article that the Allied shipoing situation can be compared only with 
that in the critical year of 1917. It is useless to publish figure? 
of what has been shipped to the Soviet Union, because shipments and 
deliveries are two entirely different things. The U.S. Maritime 
Commission announced that the amount of tonnage lost during a recent 
month by far exceeded the figure of the worst month of last year, 
which mean6 that it was greater than 849,000 GRT. Apart from tnis 
grave loss of merchant tonnage, the British Admiralty has conceded 
the loss so far of 3 battleships, 2 battle cruisers, 4 aircraft 
carriers, Z8 cruisers, 14 auxiliary cruisers, 80 destroyers, and 
40 submarines. The critical situation of British sea power must be 
attributed to strategic errors, lack of foresight and a faulty 
administration and command organization. 

U.S.A. : 

Secretary of the Navy Knox stated in an address that all steps have 
been taken to reduce ship losses to a tolerable measure in the long 
run. However, the war will last long and will be a hard one. The 
New York Times says that an open rift has occurred between Lloscow 
and the Allies in the 4th week of the battle for Stalingrad about 
the establishment of a second front. Yet nothing can justify 
establishing the second front as long as the prenarations for it 
have not been completed. It would be of no assistance to Russia if 
the democracies were beaten in the west. 

According to Swiss reports from Vichy, there are signs tnat tne 
tension between France and the U.S.A. has eased to a certain degree. 
The Washington Government is showing full consideration for France's 
difficult position and Vichy has taken the standpoint tliat the 
occasion for a break must not be provided by France. 

Turkey : 

The Transocean News Agency reports that the Turkish Foreign Minister 
offered 4 arguments to oppose Willkie's demand for active Turkish 
participation in the war on the Anglo-American side as follows: 

1. The Turkish Army's complete lack of adequate equipment. 

2. The critical Turkish food situation. 

3. The fact that Turkey would be exposed to a direct German attack. 

4. The fact that adequate Anglo-American assistance was not of- 
fered during any phase of the entire negotiations. 

According to an Argentine report, Turkey is negotiating with 
Argentina about the purchase of 500,000 tons of grain, wnich is to 
be shipped to Lisbon on Argentine vessels and transferred there to 
Turkish ships. 



-255- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1942 

Special Items 

I. Intelligence Center No. 10 has put into service all motor 
trawlers not engaged in fisning which were placed at its disposal by 
the Snipping and Transport Brancn of tne Naval Quartermaster Division 
for the surveillance of Danish fishing on tne west coast of Jutland, 
in tne Skagerrak, and in tne Kattegat. The trawlers, which are based 
on Esbjerg and Skagen, are already operating in tne Skagerrak and 
Kattegat. Operations on the west coast will start in tne immediate 
future. 

II. On 24 Aug. the Naval Staff informed the Naval Group Commands, 
the German Naval Command, Italy, and tne Fleet of its viewpoint 
concerning acceleration of communications within the Navy. This 
memorandum was prompted by the events at Dieppe and was to impress 
once more the operations staffs with the necessity for immediate 
reports (see War Diary 26 Aug.). Tne Commanding Admiral, Group West, 
replied to this memorandum on 3 Sep., indicating that Group W<=>st 
feels that the Naval Staff's note is a reproach. Neither the content 
nor tne tone of tne note justifies such interpretation, nor was it 
intended as a reproach against the Commanding Admiral, Group West. 
Witn regard to the admitted delay in transmitting its reoort, Group 
West refers to an order of tne Commanding General, West with which 

it agreed; according to this order, reports must not be sent to 
superior commands which concern tne common coastal defense or tne 
battle dispositions of another branch of the Armed Forces, unless the 
opinion of the Commanding General, West was previously obtained. 
This was evidently ordered as a result of the experiences at St. 
Nazaire and in the interest of uniform reporting. 

In its reply tne Naval Stafi once more states tne purpose of the 
memorandum and remarks that the particular illustrations used were 
selected simply because tne events at Dieppe had just hapoened. 
Instances in the past in which the Naval Staff was not satisfied 
with tne manner of reporting were settled in every instance whenever 
necessary, and there is no sense in bringing this matter up again. 

Tne order of the Commanding General, West regarding the transmission 
of reports can apply, as far as tne Navy is concerned, only to reports 
with respect to matters relating to both Army and Navy or Army and 
Air Force, but not to reports addressed to tne Naval Staff and 
relating exclusively to commitment and operations of naval forces 
and activities of naval authorities. 

III. As already stated by tne Naval Staff during tne conference on 
tne situation with the Chief, Naval Staff on 13 Aug., tne captain 
of supply ship UCKERilARK is not to be blamed for interrupting nis 
mission on 12 Aug. The regrettable breakdown of tne UCK&RHARK' s 
radio system deprived the authorities in command of the possibility 
of ordering a second breakthrough attempt following the first attack 
by enemy planes. By the repeated breakthrough attempts and by the 
successful breakthrough at the third try, the captain proved that 

he had learned by his first experience. A corresponding comment of 
the Naval 8taff has been added to the war diary of Group West under 
12 Aug. 



B-1052 

-25*- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



20 Sep. 1942 



IV. The Naval Construction Division, Section V reports that accord- 
ing to the decision of 14 Jan. 1942 the Tosmare shipyard at Libau 
nas been or will be fitted so as to permit complete simultaneous 
overhauls, inclusive of armament repairs, of 1 light cruiser, 2 
torpedo boats, and 1 submarine target vessel, wnile an additional 6 
submarines can be repaired over the weekend. The Naval Construction 
Division intends to overhaul at least one Docket battleship and 8 
mine sweepers or equivalent vessels at the same time, apart from the 
above-mentioned shios, and to oreate docking facilities for heavy 
cruisers at Libau. No date has been set wnen these goals are expected 
to be reached. 

V. The armor plating available at the Nikolayev shipyard, which is 
to be used for fortification projects upon order of the Fuehrer, hap 
already almost completely been used up in the battleship under con- 
struction there. Since so far orders have been given to preserve 
this ship, the Naval Construction Division requests a decision whethei 
she should now be dismantled, commenting that, since there are no 
plans available, to complete the snip would practically amount to 
building a new one. It therefore recommends that tne ship be die- 
mantled. , 

Comment of the Naval Staff Operations Division: 

a. It is impossible at tnis time, clue to lack of labor and 
material, to finisn the battleship. 

b. This would be difficult also at a later time since the 
plans are not available. 

c. Tne necessity to create a German Black Sea fleet of heavy 
vessels after the war is not very urgent. Besides, it will always 

be unsatisfactory to adapt a foreign design to our purposes. Thought 
should also be given to the problem of passing the Dardanelles. 

d. Purely practical considerations favor the dismantling of 
the ship; in this connection it is also important that a slipway will 
become available for the construction of merchant vessels and later 
for warships. 

e. It is desirable that the considerable quantities of raw 
material and armor plating should not be lost to the Navy upon dis- 
mantling the ship, except those which, according to the Fuehrer's 
directive, are to be used for the construction of fortifications. 

f . Conclusion : 

The Operations Division, Naval Staff has no objections 
p.gainst dismantling. However, it should be provided that all raw 
material, scrap and other material becoming available is used 
primarily, if not exclusively, for the benefit of the Navy, except 
for the armor plating which must be assigned to the construction of 
fortifications in compliance with the Fuehrer's order.. 

Instructions to this effect are given to the Naval Staff Quartermaster 
Division, which is advised to obtain a final decision from the Com- 
mander in Chief, Navy. 

vl. In accordance with a directive of the Operations Staff, Armed 
Forces High Command, precautions are to be taken that travel into 



-235- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1942 

the Caucasus area and to Stalingrad, following its capture, be 
restricted to what is absolutely essential because of tne motor 
venicle and fuel situation. (See Telegram 2135.) 



Situation 20 Sep. 1943 

I. Tar in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

It is learned from an Italian source that preparations are 
being made in Soutn Africa to accommodate 120,000 U.S. soldiers, who 
are expected to arrive in the course of the next 3 month6. 

2. Own Situation : 

Snip "10" is directed to use ner own discretion in arrang- 
ing for tne overnaul of ner engines in Japan. Subsequent to ner stay 
in Japan sne is scheduled for a mission in the Antarctic Ocean. Sne 
is requested to send a report about her schedule by way of tne !!aval 
Attache at Tokyo. On the occasion of tne engine overnaul tne boiler 
system is to be adapted for tne use of Taraxan oil. (See Radiograms 
1459 and 1203.) 

Snip "23" is informed by Radiogram 0126 tnat tne private mail ad- 
dressed to ner between tne end of May and tne end of August was lost 
due to a bomb nit on tne PASSAT. 

Tne Naval Attacne at Tokyo is requested to present to Captain Gumpricn 
upon welcoming nim to Japan tne German Cross in gold, whicn tne Com- 
mander in Cnief , Navy awarded to him on 11 Sep. 1942 on benali of tne 

Fuehrer. 

All ships in foreign waters are advised Of the situation with regard 
to sovereignty witnin tne French Colonial Emoire. (See Radiogram 
1148.) Enemy situation report by Radiogram 0545. 

The Japanese Naval Liaison Officer orally communicated tne following 
message of tne Japanese Admiralty to tne Cnief, Operations Division, 
Naval Staff: 

a. The Japanese Navy intends to extend its operations on oc- 
casion to tne operations zone agreed uoon by tne German and Japanese 
:.avie8 as long as no German auxiliary cruiser is active there. 

To tnis tne Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff remarks tnat 
Japan is, of course, at liberty to do so and tnat tne German Naval 
Staff nas no objections. Tne Cnief, Operations Division, "aval 
Staff in return asks tnat it be notified by tne Japanese Navy wnen 
tne operations zone is not incluaed in Japanese operations, so that 
a German auxiliary cruiser may ngain be sent tnere. 

b. The Japanese Navy intends to intensify its operations in 
tne South Pacific and tnerefore requests tne German Navy to refrain 
from sending an auxiliary cruiser into tnis area and ratner to send 
one into tne Indian Ocean. 



-2>6- 






CONFIDENTIAL 
80 Sep. 1948 

II. Situa tion West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Reconnaissance in the Cnannel revealed notning of in- 
terest. According to radio monitoring, a British trawler ran 
aground off Duncansbay Head. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

Tne 8nd Torpedo Boat Flotilla made an exploratory sweep 
from St. Nazaire to La Fall ice without encountering any mines. 
Mine sweeper M "4448" was seriously damaged by a ground mine in 
the gap between the minefields at tne Bayonne harbor entrance and 
had to be beached. A ground mine was swept off Lorient and one 
off La Pallice. 



Channel Coast : 

According to Group West's report, mine-laying operation 
rth of Ba 
nothing to report. 

Speoial Item : 



"Elbe" north of Barfleur was executed according to plan. Otherwise 



On 20 Sep. Admiral Marschall took over the task of Com- 
manding Admiral, Group West from Admiral Saalwaecnter. Thus the 
merging of the ooramands of Group West and the Commanding Admiral, 
France has gone into effect. 



III. North Sea. Norway. Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

3 ground mines were swept north of Schlermonnikoog and 
Terschelling. 3 more ground mines were swept off Texel on 19 Sep. 
Esoort and patrol missions were affected by bad weather. Several 
enemy planes penetrated into the Dutch area ana tne German Bignt 
during the night of 19 Sep. It is suspeoted that mines were laid 
north of Ameland, Schiermonnikoog and Borkum. 

The Commanding Admiral, Defenses, North reports that the acoustio 
mine-exploding vessels could not yet be tested in operation, as 
ordered by Group North, because the Mine Laying Experimental Com- 
mand failed to supply the required equipment. The Commanding 
Admiral, Defenses, North is convinced tnat the enemy has laid 
acoustic mines so that the allocation of protective equipment is 
of prime importance if the oonvoy routes in the North Sea are to 
be kept open. 



.237" B-105 2 






2C - 

' : : r * - 

Convoy service it Lral, -»orway pro- 

ceeifi ftccardli ledfroa 

By order T t>er F: rans- 

er completion 

of 

■- 

I 38 

: :" Iristiar.e id Sorl . - rt - installatic - : - - --'. battery, and 

srrong- 
i on in- 
al, Norway 
is too 

narbor it- 
s' 

? the Cocmandi- 
?vise . - " Dg 

of all important 
rand North . 

The Comb - : tnie 

consru jssaan - a l» Arise i 

Forces, Norway is receiv 

.c:::c Ocean : 

:S7 Si- --.tic-. : 

iio a: . "tercepted a report of tne 95th Air 

Force Air I -,-s of tne 

Arcti "3 on 19 Sep. , which 

ur: : . ce coapoeixion of the 

es 4 ~lere, a gr : 

of 3C ve. e is report e - Nos area. 

Tne f= tat re a flights a; ; - into tne area 

ncr anil) ::;s seeae t^ oate tnat acre stragglers are 

expected. One m fire ( :ng at 
15 

Pen 8ituatloa 

?t convoy ^P 14 : 

'- I i a r r- :::s of oox sumarinee , 
.voy QP 14 was sa a northwesterly -: adel for 

quadrant AB 2320 u f 19 Sep., when it changed to a 

, Norway aseuaes that 
the u was~r: : rier t: pick op the 

supply tankej laitii seat coast, 

",e subaarlnes were "Token cor.tact with tr.e 

ccr e was :ed to tr.e southwest, correspond- 

rt to the cc- age :: c:^r r r to set as aany 

~nal for 
at s at C72S. Tne oonwoy :s report ei t:~c,r.8ist of 

at. - by 5 submarines 

>sition was I nt A3 1914. 



-2J8- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



20 Sep. 194* 



Submarine U "435" (commanded by Lt. Strelow) scored 4 hits with 5 
torpedoes at 0627 and definitely sank one destroyer, probably sank 
a 6,000 GRT steamer, and torpedoed 2 other steamers. At 1820 sub- 
marine U "255" scored 3 hits on a large steamer; strong interference 
by the defense forces prevented observation of her sinking. Sub- 
marine U "703" sank a TRIBAL class deRtroyer at 1955 in quadrant 
AB 1836 and reported an aircraft carrier, apparently the FURIOUS, 
near the convoy. A patrol line cf 7 submarines from quadrant 
AB 1785 to AB 4257 is planned for 0500 of 21 Sep. 

k\ 1622 an enemy submarine made an unsuccessful attack on submarine 
U "408" in quadrant AB 1376. Submarine U "403" reported a large 
Russian S I submarine in quadrant AB 6976 which was in telegraphic 
communication with another nearby submarine, and was operating 
against U "403". 

No report about the combat activities of the Air Force was received. 

Group North calls the attention of the Corrr-anding Admiral, Sub- 
marines (with copy to the Admiral, Arctic Ocean) to the route 
usually taken by heavy escort groups of P^ and QP convoy3 which 
runs on a line connecting quadrants AN 1535, AM 3245, AE 9635, 
5355, 3775, 3445, and 3245; thus we can assume that the forces 
protecting v£P 14 will follow a similar course and will head for the 
Scapa Flow area possibly after refueling in Reidar or Seydis Fjord. 
Group North requests the Commanding Admiral, Submarines to examine 
whether any submarines en route to operations areas could operate 
for a short while particularly in the Faeroe Islands area. 

Special Item : 

The Commanding Admiral, Arctic Ocean reported to Group North that 
the office of Chief of Staff need not be filled for the time being, 
although the office should be maintained in view of otner branches 
of the Armed Forces. The Commanding Admiral, Group North deems 
it absolutely necessary to assign an additional flag officer as 
aide to the Admiral, Arctic Ooean in view of the planned rein- 
forcement of the naval forces in the Arctic Ocean. 

The matter is being studied in consultation with tke Naval Officer 
Personnel Division. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Additional ships were assigned to channel-sweeping operations 
in the area of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea. In 
view of the surprise appearance of British acoustic mines and the 
complete lack of protective equipment, save one experimental 
apparatus, the Baltic Naval Station requests that all anti-acoustic 
mine devices should be given highest priority regardless of tne 
usual procedure, since the submarines are directly affected. The 
Naval Staff has ordered an investigation of the situation. 

A three-masted schooner was damaged by a mine in the Little Belt. 
In the soutnern part of the Great Belt a Danisn steamer sank after 
striking a mine. 



"239- B-10 5 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



20 Sep. 194a 



Army Coastal Battery "521" reported sighting a submarine off 
Hirtsnals at 1045. The Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea 
questions this report and states that no German submarine is located 
in the Skagerrak. Due to the lack of appropriate ships and because 
of many enemy mines, a submarine chase in the Skagerrak is impos- 
sible. The escorts of all important convoy6 conducted through the 
Skagerrak are reinforced. 

According to a Swedish press report, approximately 15 British planes 
dropped mines in Swedish territorial waters in Oere Sound during 
tne nignt of 18 Sep. Swedish anti-aircraft batteries laid a barrage 
in the path of the incoming aircraft. A Swedish auxiliary warship 
engaged in mine-sweeping was seriously damaged at noon on 19 Sep. 
by striking a mine and sank. 

Transports from Danzig to Finland were halted pending clearance of 
the sea lanes. 

A subchaser had a brush with 3 enemy PT boats in quadrant AD 3717 
in the Gulf of Finland. 4 enemy torpedo boats unsuccessfully 
attacked a mine-sweeper in quadrant A0 3631. Nortn of Vigrund a 
Russian PT boat ran aground and was abandoned by the crew, Russian 
fighter planes set the boat afire. Enemy covering ships were fired 
on by our mine sweepers and witndrew behind a smoke screen. 

Otherwise there is notning to report from the area of tne Commander 
Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

Group North and the Baltic Naval Station repeatedly urged 
that oontrol stations be set up off Trelleborg and in Kalraar Sound 
where merchant ships arriving from Finland and eastern Sweden would 
be compelled to halt for a cneck of their sailing instructions. 
Since tnis suggestion can be carried out only if tne Swedish 
Government agrees, .the Foreign Office approached them about tne 
matter in July 1942. So far, the result was negative. Tne Naval 
Staff agrees with the opinion held by the Foreign Office tnat a 
change of tne Swedish Government's attitude cannot be anticipated 
in the near future/on account of its basic policies, and tnerefore 
we cannot hope to "carry out the plan proposed by Group North and 
the Baltic Naval Station. Both of them were notified to this 
effect. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Reconnaissance activity of both air groups was slight. 
Radio monitoring intercepted a few submarine warning signals off 
the American coast and in the West Indies. 

According to an announcement of tne Britisn Admiralty, submarine 
URGE is overdue. According to a Canadian Navy Ministry communique, 



.240- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1943 

the Canadian destroyer ASSINIBOINE reported sinking a German sub- 
marine, the captain of which was killed in the action, wnile the 
crew was taken prisoner. A press report from Lisbon asserts that 
the British steamer ALOUETTE was torpedoed and sunk on 19 Sep. off 
Cape Espichel. 

2. Own Situation : 

2 submarines sailed for the zone of operations. 

Regarding operation against convoy QP 14 see Own Situation, Arctio 
Ocean. 

In tne North Atlantic, Group "Pfeil", too, was directed to operate 
against the convoy proceeding on a northeasterly course in quadrant 
AK, so that a total of 21 submarines, including those of Group "Los0* 
and 2 submarines en route from Germany to their operations areas, 
are operating against this convoy. At first progress of the 
operation was af'ected by the increasingly bad weather. Submarine 
U "373" attacked a corvette in quadrant AK 4<sl5 witn a 3-fan and, 
according to hydrophone observation, scored a hit on the convoy. 
Subsequently the sinking of a steamer was detected by hydrophone. 
Almost simultaneously the convoy was attacked also by submarine 
U "596" which heard the explosions of 2 steamers. Debri6 was 
sighted. It may be that submarine U "373" and U "596" sank the 
same steamer. Contact with the convoy was lost .in quadrant ak 
1949 and 2000. 

Group "Vorwaerts" has refueled. 

No results were reported from the American coast and the West 
Indies, nor from the submarines in the South Atlantic, where Group 
"litis" is informed that a northbound convoy is expected to arrive 
at its patrol line on 21 Sep. 

Nothing to report from the Mediterranean.- 

For additional reports see supplement to submarine situation in War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 

As reported by the German Armistice Commission, the dispatch vessel 
DUliONT D'URVILLE nae taken aboard 14 more British survivors, apart 
fr'om those reported to be on board the cruiser GLOIRE. The DUMONT 
D'URVILLE and the ANNAMITE are proceeding to the rendezvous with 
the Italian submarine at 1000 (German Summer Time) in 02° 00' S 
13° 25» W. 

Special Item: 

With reference to Group North's complaint regarding the loading 
facilities for SMA mines (see War Diary 18 Sep.), the Mining and 
Barrage Inspectorate states that installations for the storage 
and loading of SMA mines at Atlantic ports were begun 18 months 
ago. The Cnatern installation at Brest is now finished and some 
ships have already been equipped tnere. Installation Keranten 
at Lorient and Regue de Thau at Bordeaux are still under construction, 
SMA mi 8 have also already been loaded at Kiel. The request that 
mines also be loaded in Norway is entirely new. 



-24l- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1942 

VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Iele6 and Vicinity : 

There was little reconnaissance activity because of bad 
weather. Sunderland was raided with good result by 19 planes during 
the night of 19 Sep. 

2. Incursions : 

No enemy planes flew into German or German-occupied ter- 
ritory. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

Reconnaissance missions were flown to Suez and Kufra 
oasis and combat missions in support of the Panzer Corps, North 
Africa. Enemy air activity was at a minimum. ' 

4. Eastern Front : 

42 enemy planes were reported shot down at the various 
Army fronts. 

Reconnaissance flights over the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. 

The 1st Air Force deployed 307 planes in support of the 11th Army. 
Ships were attacked on Lake Ladoga and 1 small steamer was sunk, 
another one damaged and a patrol boat set afire. 

Convoy PQ 18 was observed dispersing off Archangel in the Arctic 
Ocean. Due to bad weather the harbor itself could not be reoon- 
noitered, neither could convoy P^ 14 be spotted. 



VIII. Warfare In the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation. Mediterranean : 

According to press reports, the planes at Gibraltar were 
reinforced by another 36 planes. With this exception, there is 
nothing to report from the entire Mediterranean area. 

2. Own Situation. Mediterranean : 

The oaptured Britisn motor torpedo boat "314" was com- 
missioned as a fast subchaser by the -6th Motor Mine Sweeper 
Flotilla under tne name "RA 10". 

During the nignt of 19 Sep. Bardia was attacked without result 
by enemy planes; an attack on Navarino during the evening of 19 
Sep. fared no better. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Steamer SATURNO proceeding from Palermo to Tripoli put 
into Trapani during the night of 19 Sep. in order to escape an 
enemy air attack, and sailed from there in the evening of 20 Sep. 



-242- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1942 

An enemy plane attacked 4 auxiliary sailing vessels under way from 
Tripoli to Bengnazi on 19 Sep.; no damage nas been reported. With 
these exceptions, supply shipping from Italy and Greeoe to North 
Africa and North African coastal traffic proceeded according to 
plan. 

4. Area Naval Group South ; 

Aegean Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

d submarines were signted northeast of Candia. 

Own Situation ; 

Convoy service on schedule without special incidents. 

Group South asks for a reduction of the Italian October oil quota 
from Rumania by 10,000 tons, whicft should be allocated to tne 
Admiral, Aegean Sea for the most urgent requirements of Africa 
transports which cannot be carried out with only 6,000 tons. 
Besides, the Italian Naval High Command has withdrawn a good deal 
of the oil stored at Piraeus and transferred it to tne Central 
Mediterranean. (See Telegram 1815.) 

A decision will be made by tne Naval Staff Quartermaster Division. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation ; 

A northbound barge convoy was attacked during the night 
of 19 Sep. off Burnoe with 2 submarine torpedoes, both of wnioh 
missed. 2 Italian submarines under way to the Bosporus developed 
engine trouble and will be transferred from Constanta to the Crimea 
after completion of repairs. 3 more Italian submarines sailed from 
Sulina on 19 Sep. 

A few buildings were damaged during an air raid on Mariupol on 
19 Sep. Renewed air attacks on Balaklava and Ivanbaba took place 
on 20 Sep. A mine-sweeping plane crasned off Kerch Strait on 
19 Sep. due to engine trouble. Escort service according to plan. 



IX. Situation East Asia 

The Commander in Cnief of tne India Fleet announced tnat all 
major Indian ports have been converted into naval bases. The main 
bases are Karachi, Bombay, Madras, and Calcutta. 

According to a U.S. Navy Department oommunique, a Japanese foroe 



consisting of several battleships and cruisers was attacked on 



-243- 






B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



SO Sep. 1942 



14 Sep. northeast of Tulagi by heavy U.S. bombers which ran into 
strong anti-aircraft fire. 2 battleships were probably hit. 

General MacArthur's headquarters report that the battle on Timor 
between Australian and Japanese units is still going on. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A ; 

Enemy landing attempts southwest of Novorossisk are 
reported to have been repulsed by Rumanian forces; details have not 
yet been learned. The railroad bridge across the Terek River at 
Arik was captured undamaged in a surprise attack. Tne large dam 
east of Liaisky was captured, too. 

Army Group B ; 

Tne enemy attacked heavily east of Cnalchutea and gained 
some ground. Since we have observed preparations for further 
attacks, German reserves are being brought up. At the southern 
sector of the Stalingrad front we foiled enemy attempts to approach 
our lines. A few fortified blocks were captured in the city after 
bitter fighting. Enemy attacks southeast of Kotluban were repulsed 
At the penetration point northeast of Borodkin the enemy attacked 
with strong infantry and tank forces; the action is still in 
progress. 2 villages in the Don River bend northwest of Kachlinska 
were captured by the enemy. Our counterattack failed. 4 enemy 
attacks on tne left wing of the Voronezh bridgehead and anotner 
thrust against the right wing and the center of the 75th Infantry 
Division were repulsed. Fighting north of Voronezh continues. 

Central Army Group ; 

An attack west of Byelev collapsed with heavy enemy losses|. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Partisan bands were engaged southwest of Kholra. An enemy 
attack against the railway embankment north of Sychevka was repulsed]. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

Strong enemy pressure was maintained at Maselskaya. During 
the night of 17 Sep. a strong Russian detachment landed on the 
southern shore of Motovsky Bay on the northeastern sector. Our 
counterattack forced the enemy to reembark under the protection of 
heavily armed ships. Enemy motor launches which tried to enter 
Litsa Bay by daylight were forced to withdraw under artillery fire, 

3. North Africa ; 

Normal enemy artillery and reconnaissanoe activity. 



-244- B-105 2 



> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
20 Sep. 1942 

The 9th Australian Infantry Division, deployed at the northern sec- 
tor of the El Alanein line, was relieved. The Italian garrison of 
Gialo oasis is still holding out and is supported by German and 
Italian air forces. 

[ Handwritten note by the Chief of Staff, Naval Staff to the Naval 
Staff Operations Branch, Mine Warfare and Ant i -Submarine section: 

Referring to paragraph IV (Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic 
Sea) about protective equipment against acoustic mines: This is 
not true. It may be, however, that the Commander, Mine Sweepers, 
Baltic Sea failed to order adequate equipment in time and to for- 
ward it to the threatened areas and also neglected to train per- 
sonnel. 

Signed: Fricke, Chief of Staff, Naval Staff, 27 Sep, 

This has been settled. See War Diary 24 Sep. 1942, 
paragraph IV. 



29 Sep. 1942] 



^;.^;..;;..;;_;;_;;_;;j;_«_;;_»;„;;.^;_;;„;;„;;.-;;_;;_;;..;;. 



I 



-245" B-105 2 



SOHFIDEMTIAL 



21 Sep. 1S42 



Items of Political Importance 

U.S.A. : 

Secretary of the Navy Knox also made the following statements: 

At the present time the submarine threat is the most difficult problem 
for the U.S.A. It affects in particular the decision regarding the 
establishment of a second European front, the date for the beginning 
of a large-scale count eroffensive in the western Pacific, and the 
oroblerr of supplying war material to the Russian Army. The battle 
against the submarines will be long and hard. On the other hand, it 
is fortunate that the Axis Powers are losing their air superiority 
more and core. For their victories in Russia the Germans had to pay 
a orice out of proportion with the result. The German and Italian 
Uavies are on the defensive in all theaters of war. The German sub- 
marines have been driven from the British home waters and from the 
U.S. Atlantic coast. 

Great Britain : 

According to Reuter, the First Lord of the Admiralty announced that 
within the last 2 1/4 years it has been possible to make uo for the 
lose of battleships, aircraft carriers and cruisers and to more than 
replace the very great loss of destroyers. In addition, a fleet of 
corvettes and of hundreds of small landing craft has been newly created, 
At some future date it will be said that once again the fleet 6aved 
Great Britain from her greatest ordeal. 

In a radio address to the American people Lord Halifax pointed out that 
the British nation has undergone an important change of mind. The 
passive attitude that everything depended on the ability to hold out has 
been replaced by the recognition that it is necessary to strike at the 
enemy in order to win the war. The tremendous fanaticism fostered by 
National Socialism must be countered by a firm belief in democratic 
ideals. 

Finland : 

The Finnish Envoy to Washington officially confirms the rumors that 
Finland has a6ked for a separate peace. Similar statements were made 
also by other diplomatic missions. According to Reuter, Secretary of 
State Hull is said to have declared that the U.S. Government has been 
inferred about the Finnish willingness to conclude a separate peace. 

Bulgaria : 

On 16 Sep. the Prime Minister lodged a protest with the Russian Embassy 
at Sofia against the bombing of Bulgarian towns by Russian planes. 

Argentina : 

The German Embassy in a statement to the press denies the accusations 
against the German Naval Attache which were made by the investigating 
committee and declared that the Attache had no connection whatsoever 
with the escape of officers and crew members of the pocket battleship 

ADMIRAL GRAF SFEE. 



-246- B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 
21 Sep. 1942 

Special Items 

I. A directive has been issued to the Naval Quartermaster Division 
in order to comply with the Fuehrer's wish that the Navy use all 
available ships in Norway during the coming winter season. 

For copy see 1/Skl I op 1829/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. Ha. 

II. The British Admiralty and Air Ministry reported that more than 
100,000 mines have been laid in enemy waters since the beginning of 
the war; they were laid in the Baltic Sea, in the Kiel Canal and off 
the French Atlantic coast. Surface forces and submarines laid mines 
on all shipping routes from Norway to the French Atlantic coast. The 
mine-laying offensive has been stepped up during the last 6 months. 

III. The Wilhelmshaven Intelligence Center reported on the questioning 
of crew members from the British steamers EARL ST ON and CARLTON which 
were sunk during the operation against convoy PQ 17. The report con- 
tains valuable information about enemy ship losses and enemy merchant 
shipping in general. For copies see l/Skl 31673/42 geh. and 31675/42 
geh. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XI. 

Another interrogation report of the same agency contains interesting 
statements of crew members of motor gunboat "335", captured on 12 Sep. 
about the organization and operations of British gunboats in the 
Channel. For copies see 1/Skl 31674 and 31676/42 geh. in War Diary, 
Part C, Vol. lib. 



Situation 21 Sep. 194S 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report, 

2. Own Situation ; 

At 2037 ship "23" reported: "Equipped for 5 months; fuel 
supply sufficient for 12 weeks; expecting depot or supply ship on 15 
Nov." 

Receipt of the message by the Naval Staff is confirmed by Radiogram 
2219. 

By Radiogram 0636 the Naval Staff informs the CHARLOTTE SCHLISMANN of 
the sailing instructions cabled by the Naval Attache at Tokyo for the 
voyage to Singapore. The ship is to proceed from Singapore to 
Yokohama . 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo is notified that the Naval Staff expects the 
CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN to reach the Sunda Strait around 26 Sep. The 
Attache is requested to report at his convenience when and to whom the 
mines and torpedoes from the DOGGERBANK were delivered. (See Telegram 
1540.) 

Enemy situation r eport to allaMps in forelgn_wnt.flrn by Radiograms 

1331 and 2000. 

-2*7- 

" ' B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
21 Sep. 1942 

The Naval Staff issued operations order l/Skl Ik 1777/42 Gkdos. Chefs. 
to ship "45" on 18 Sep. The ship is to carry on cruiser warfare in 
foreign waters; the most important object is to tie up enemy naval 
forces and to inflict damage to the enemy: 

a) by forcing him to organize convoys and to reinforce the pro- 
tection of shipping also in remote waters; 

b) by increasing the demands made on his naval forces; 

c) by deterring neutral ships from carrying goods for the enemy; 

d) by other unfavorable effects of mercantile and financial 
nature. 

Copy no. 8 of the order is filed in War Diary, Part C, Vol. I. 

Also on 18 Sep., the sailing orders for the ELSA ESSBERGER and the 
A:iNELIESE ESSBERGER were forwarded to Group West. These orders are 
identical with those issued to blockade-runners heretofore. For en- 
closures regarding routes, reference and rendezvous points see l/Skl 
IK 1822/42 Gkdos. Chefs. (Copy no. 4) in War Diary, Part C, Vol. I. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation ; 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

The roadstead and harbor of La Pallice which were closed to 
shipping the evening of 20 Sep. were reopened. A ground mine was 
swept off La Rochelle and 3 mine explosions were observed off lie de 
Groix. 

Channel Coast: 



lost. 



Steamer DIAMANT (780 GRT ) ran aground near Jersey and was 
Special Item: 



The Commander, Destroyers reports the final list of ships 
assigned to escort ship "45 n : Torpedo boat T "23" with the commander 
of the 5th Motor Mine Sweeper Flotilla aboard, torpedo boat T "22", 
the JAGUAR, and if necessary the FALKE. These ships can arrive at 
Cuxhaven in the forenoon of 6 Oct. at the earliest. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea: 

-Enemy-Sltuat lon^ t 

Nothing to report. 

-248- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
21 Sep. 1942 

Own Situation ; 

4 ground mines were swept in the area of the Commanding 
Admiral, Defenses, North. Mine Sweeper M "3412" was strafed by enemy 
planes west of Scheveningen at 1730 and suffered slight casualties. 
Patrol operations were curtailed due to bad weather. 

2. Norway ; 

A Russian battery on Rybachi Peninsula fired 108 shots at an 
eastbound convoy on 20 Sep. without causing damage, and on 21 Sep. 10 
shots at Petsamo harbor, causing minor damage. 19 shots were fired by 
us in reply. 

The electric power plant in the Glom Fjord was destroyed by sabotage. 

On 20 Sep. there was slight enemy air activity in the western coastal 
area. 

Regarding a planned minefield off the west coast in the Lister area sae 
Telegram 1915. 

On the basis of a request by the Commanding Admiral, Norway, the Naval 
Staff inquires how many artillery barges have been asked fcr use as 
gun carriers and how many as anti-aircraft carriers. The suggestion 
made at the same time that naval barges be converted into floating 
torpedo batteries is still being investigated. Since artillery barges 
can be used as transports only to a limited extent, the Commanding Ad- 
miral, Norway can expect to get a number of additional naval barges 
for transport purposes soon. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

London claims that the losses of convoy PQ 18 announced in 
the German Armed Forces communique are grossly exaggerated. 

According to the radio intercept service, convoy PQ 18 consisting of 2|B 
merchant and 22 escort vessels, passed Kanin Nos at noon. At this 
time and later, air attacks and hits on the convoy were observed. It 
can thus be assumed that the successes against PQ 18 which the 5th Air 
Force reported for 18 Sep. were achieved only while the convoy was 
passing Kanin Nos or thereafter. If actually 6 merchant vessels were 
definitely and 2 more were probably sunk as reported, according to the 
information available to the Naval Staff, 20 or at the most 23 merchant 
vessels may be assumed to have been destroyed, including those probably 
sunk. Air and photo reconnaissance at 0800 established a group of 20 
merchant ships and 6 escort vessels proceeding on a southerly course 
at low speed directly off Archangel and another merchant ship somewhat 
behind them. These ships probably represent the part of PQ 18 which 
succeeded in reaching Archangel. There may be a few more stragglers. 
The Armed Forces High Command communique of 20 Sep. mentions a total 
of 38 merchant vessels sunk, however. The Naval Staff believes it 
necessary to investigate this discrepancy. 

Own Situation ; 

Operation against convoy QP 14 : 

Guided by air reconnaissance, our submarines establl shed 



" 2 *9" B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
21 Sep. 1942 

contact with QP 14 around noon In quadrant AB 4115 and were able to 
maintain contact until 2200, at which time the convoy was in quadrant 
AA 6921. No successes have been reported. Submarine U "606" fired at 
a Consolidated plane, forcing it to make an emergency landing. 

In Its comment on the brief report of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean on the 
operation against convoy PQ 18, Group North states that our submarine 
operations were handicapped by the strong air and destroyer escorts 
as well as by the well disciplined behavior of the convoy and the 
efficient manner in which it was handled. These facts accounted for 
the absence of damaged ships and stragglers, against which submarine 
attacks proved so successful in the case of convoy PQ 17. For a copy 
of this comment see l/Skl 23457/42 Gkdos. in file "Eispalast". 

Group North asks permission for mine operation "Meisenbalz" to be 
carried out by the HIPPER alone, without the KOELN. 

Group North's plan to have submarine U "117" lay a tactical barrage 
meets with the approval of the Naval Staff. The Naval Staff must> re- 
serve its decision, however, on account of mine-laying operations in 
the area of the Commanding Admiral, Submarines which may be more im- 
portant. Moreover, Group North's plan cannot be carried out at 
present because the clockwork arming switches (UES) must be set for at 
least 3 hours, since the mines cannot be guaranteed to function 
properly sooner due to oscillation after they are moored. 

For possible future submarine mine-laying operations in the area of 
Group North following the return of submarine U "117", 132 SMA mines 
equipped with safety and timing mechanisms are allocated with the 
designation "Bruno V". Details are to be worked out directly between 
the Group and the Mining and Barrage Inspectorate. The Naval Ordnance 
Division, Underwater Obstacles Branch, is instructed accordingly and 
requested to examine immediately whether and by how much the minimum 
3 hour delay mentioned above can be reduced, and what disadvantages 
might result. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

The effects of the enemy's mine offensive of 19 Sep. and the use 
of acoustic mines has had other effects: A British acoustic aerial 
mine was detonated by a seaplane taking off from the Copenhagen Air 
Force Station. 4 more acoustic mines were swept in the Pommersche Bucht 
partly by means of towed coil gear and partly by vibration. A dredge 
was sunk off Gdynia due to an explosion. Submarine U "446" sank In 
the southern gap of the Danzig minefield after her stern struck a 
mine. 18 men of the crew were rescued, the captain is missing. An 
unidentified Danish motor trawler struck a mine and sank. There were 
no survivors. Another 4 mines were swept north of Swinemuende and 
southeast of Rixhoeft. 

Another incursion by enemy planes took place at the Baltic Sea 
entrances during the night of 21 Sep.; mine-laying is suspected. 

The Air Force General Staff telephoned that tanker MITTELMEER (6,370 
GRT) with 850 tons of aviation gasoline for the 5th Air Force has been 
ready to sail at Libau since 13 Sep. Since the convoy had not been re- 
ported to the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea or to Group North, 
the tanker must now wait, because of the lack of escort vessels, for the 
next convoy of hospital ships for Finland which will sail in 



-250- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



21 Sep. 1942 



approximately 10 days. The blame for this delay rests exclusively with 
the Air Force, which failed to report in time. 

Operations of light forces in the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, 
Baltic Sea continued to be affected by bad weather. 

Convoy service: a supply transport from Libau to Reval had to be 
cancelled due to the breakdown of an escort vessel. A southbound con- 
voy had to put into Libau temporarily due to closing of the Neu- 
fahrwasser area; on this occasion steamer I.IOLTKEFELS ran aground. A 
Russian patrol boat was observed sinking off Nargen on 20 Sep., 
probably duo to a mine. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

Ore shipments from Lulea during the week of 23 to 29 Aug. in- 
creased over those of the preceding week by 44,000 tons, since larger 
German vessels were used. 45 ships, including 7 German and 31 Swedish 
vessels, were loaded. Total shipments during this season amounted to 
1,930,225.5 tons up to 31 Aug., which is approximately 200 tons less 
than last year. 

Harbor traffic at Freetown increased in July and August in tonnage as 
v/ell as in number of ships. 

The Government of Brazil ordered the nationalization of the entire 
merchant marine, of all shipyards, and oil refineries. 

For more news about foreign merchant shipping see Brief Report No. 
31/42 of the Naval Staff Intelligence Division, Foreign Merchant 
Marine Branch. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

Lively reconnaissance activity in the southern rendezvous 
area. A submarine attack was reported approximately 80 miles south of 
Halifax. Freetown rebroadcast a submarine warning signal originating 
about 45 miles north of Ascension. 

2. Own Situation : 

2 more submarines are en route to the zone of operations. 

Regarding operation against convoy QP 14 see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean, 

Operations against the convoy in quadrant AK were seriously hampered 
by unfavorable weather in the North Atlantic. Reports from submarines 
assert that offensive action is impossible. Since the weather is ex- 
pected to improve, the operation is continued. 

Group "Vorwaerts" placed 7 submarines on patrol line from quadrant BC 
3143 to BC 3851, where a westbound convoy is anticipated for 23 Sep. 

Submarine U n 175" reports from the West Indies sinking a 6,000 GRT 

-251- B-1052 



CGWFTIKTlAl 
21 Sep. 1942 

stear.er In quadrant EG 1865. 

Submarine U "SSI" sank a 500 ton sailing vessel in the eastern Medi- 
terranean. 

For further developments see supplement to submarine situation ir Vi'ar 
liar~, Part P., Vol". IV. 

the German Armistice Commission reports that gunboat BOilOOT D I CRVI11Z 
took over 42 survivors from the Italian submarine and is continuing 
the search. The French request that Axis submarines be notified of 
this. This request will be complied with. 



VII. Aerial ".Varfare 

Ryitlsh T«ile<! and v J ~ J - J — • 

Reconnai5sar.ce flights and fighter bomber attacks on Bexhill 
took place during the day. 

2. Incursicr.s : 

11 enemy planes flew over the Baltic Sea entrances, 1 plane 
into the Heligoland area, evidently :cr Bine-laying. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

Lng to report . 

4 . Fast err. Front : 

? k econnaissar.ce activity over the Black Sea, the Caspian Sea, 
and the Arctic Ocean. For details see daily situation report. For 
operations against convoys QP 14 and PQ, 18 see Situation Arctic Ocean. 



"111. V.arfare ir the veiit err ar.ear. _- . .-. i the rla:> Sea 

1. Srer.y Siv-a:::.-, heiit errare :.r. : 

There is nothing to report about the naval situation in the 
western Mediterranean. 119 aircra:"- a observed in the harbor and tr. 
the airfield of Gibraltar. This ver .-iiera'cle r.urher of planes 
makes it appear likely that the air f tree units on Malta are to be 
reinforced. 2 sutr.arir.es ere si.thtei ir. the cer.tral Mediterranean 
off Brirdisi and Hagusa. Photo reconnaissance of Alexandria revealed 
nothing of importance in the eastern ~ i -h-erlnea were 

sighted from the coast proceeding on a westerly course north of Crete* 

2. Own bituaticn, he chit err an ear. : 

2 Italian PT boats in waiting position in the Strait of 
Sicily were repeatedly attacked by enemy planes in the evening of 19 
Sep.; one boat was sunk. 

Enemy planes raided Tobruk during the night of 2C Sep.; one of the 

attackers was shot down. 



-252- 



CONFIDENTIAL; 
21 Sep. 1942 

The Commanding Admiral, Submarines, the German Naval Command, Italy arid 
the Commander, Submarines, Italy are explicitly informed by the Naval 
Staff (with copy to the Naval Representative on the Operations Staff, 
Armed Forces High Command) that neither Italian commands nor the 
Italian Liaison Officer to the Commanding Admiral, Submarines are to 
be informed of the planned transfer of German submarines, because ut- 
most secrecy is absolutely essential. 

On request of the Naval Representative on the Armed Forces High Command, 
Operations Staff, the Naval Staff asked the Italian High Command for 
its position with regard to retaliatory measures for the sinking of 
the Italian hospital ship ARNO. The Italian High Command considers it 
unwise to take such steps against British hospital ships in the Medi- 
terranean, since their activity is very limited and unimportant. On 
the other hand, Germany and Italy have a moral obligation to ship theifr 
wounded and sick out of Africa without interference, and this is also 
necessary for reasons of supply. 

The Italian attitude, which corresponds to that of the Naval Staff, is 
submitted to the Armed Forces High Command. (See Telegram 1055.) 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

The attacks on the escorted steamers MONGINEVRO and APUANIA 
during the night of 19 Sep. were unsuccessful and the ships reached 
Benghazi undamaged. Steamer SATURNO was not attacked by enemy planes 
during the night of 19 Sep. as erroneously reported, but is proceed- 
ing to Cagliari on schedule. The steamer CASTORE which ran aground on 
17 Sep. was refloated and is en route to Tripoli. Steamer PALOMBA 
(1,110 GRT), proceeding from Palermo to Tripoli, ran aground in the 
northern part of Hammamet Bay. Auxiliary sailing vessel EVA IIGELI STRIA 
sank on 10 Sep. in Bomba Bay for unknown reasons. 140 ton3 of German 
cargo were salvaged. Supply and coastal traffic otherwise according 
to plan. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 

Special Item : 

The Fuehrer ordered that first of all the personnel required 
to reinforce the Crete defenses be shipped there as quickly as possible 
and with only the most essential equipment. Transport planes are to 
be assigned for this purpose. The Commanding General, Armed Forces, 
Southeast was ordered by the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Com- 
mand to submit a proposal for the priority to be accorded to shipments 
of the remaining equipment and personnel. Exactly what ships will be 
available for these transports cannot yet be foreseen. The Operations 
Staff, Armed Forces High Command will report on this matter following 
clarification of the amount of tonnage, particularly French tonnage, 
which will be available. (See Telegram 1410.) 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

According to air reconnaissance on 20 and 21 Sep., lively 
steamer traffic was observed on the east coast to and from Tuapse; 

B-1052 

-853- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



21 Sep. 1942 



night traffic has apparently been resumed. For details see Aerial 
Warfare • 

Own Situation : 

5 Italian submarines arrived at Ochakov from Sulina on 20 
Sep. A bomb attack on an enemy submarine off Cape Sarych was up- 
successful. A landing attempt by Russian FT boats and subchasers north- 
west of Novorossisk during the night of 20 Sep. was repulsed by 2 
vessels of the Neumann group. Casualties were light. 5 small enemy 
ships were fired upon by a land-based battery in Ivanbaba Bay during 
•the night of 19 Sep. Balaklava, Yalta, Ivanbaba, Feodosiya, and Kerch 
were repeatedly raided by enemy planes. The small tanker M03ELLA was 
damaged at Balaklava. The front end of the stone pier at Anapa was 
destroyed. The wooden pier is unfit for use. All roads in the harbor 
of Novorossisk are open to enemy observation and fire. 

Convoy operations in the Black Sea proceeded according to plan and 
without interference. 



IX. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A ; 

11 enemy air attacks were made on Kerch. The remnants from 
the landing attempt southwest of Novorossisk were mopped up completely. 
At the Terek front we captured the railroad station of Baksan. In 
addition we captured 4 small villages. All enemy attacks against the 
eastern flank of the 13th Panzer Division were repulsed. 

Army Group B ; 

At Chalchutea the enemy withdrew to his original fortified 
field positions. The battle for Stalingrad continues with undiminished 
tenacity. Enemy attacks on the northern sector between the Volga and 
Don Rivers became weaker. A tank-supported penetration at the Kotluban 
railway station was repulsed and another attack halted. Our counter- 
attacking forces west of Kachalinskaya gained ground in an easterly 
direction. Russian attacks in the Don River bend were repulsed. Enemy 
attempts to cross the Don at Kazanckaya on the Italian sector were 
frustrated. An enemy attack in the Don River bend north of Voronezh 
collapsed. A new attack supported by 42 tanks is in progress. Enemy 
forces which penetrated into our line south of Yelets were thrown back T 

Central Army Group : 

Renewed enemy attacks in the Rzhev area were repulsed. Tanks 
which had succeeded in penetrating our lines were either destroyed or 
driven off. An enemy attack along the road from Zubtsov to Rzhev gained 



-254- 

"' B-1052 



> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
21 Sep. 1942 

ground In a northwesterly direction. The situation is not yet clari- 
fied. Local reserves were thrown into battle. The enemy succeeded in, 
penetrating into the city park of Rzhev but was almost completely 
thrown back again. For the first time after a long silence heavy 
enemy gunfire flared up north of Deraidov. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Forces of the 11th Army attacked Gaitolovo. The enemy is 
offering stubborn resistance. The Chernaya River was crossed. North- 
west of Gaitolovo we broke into the enemy position and repulsed enemy 
counterattacks . 

2. Finnish Front : 

The Svirstroi power plant is under fire from heavy enemy guns 
Enemy attacks at Maselskaya were repulsed by counterattacks. At the 
northern flank of the northeastern sector a battle is in progress with 
enemy forces of batallion strength. A renewed landing attempt of 2 
cutters was frustrated. Lively shipping was observed in Motovsky Bay. 

The sabotage act against the Glom Fjord power plant during the night 
of 20 Sep. was executed by 6 Englishmen and 1 Norwegian who probably 
landed from a plane; all of them were captured. 

3. North Africa : 

Slight enemy artillery and reconnaissance activity. 

BM H HM9iH t ttMHMHBBBItHMHM tt H»H 



> 



-855- 



B-1052 



22. Se . 1 . 

Ite.-.s :: Jclitical - - •" : , g 

Russia.-, st te-er.ts have en heard ni: the .eneral dis- 

suasion about a seccr.d European front, to the effect that 3reat 

zrltair. needs 3 seccr.i front m Sovie 5ia; only in this 

a :a- Lermar.p : - "-'=ver.:e: :r.: : :r. re:-. - : ra tl a ~ r.?r ::r:es on 

3n the basis of ] bington military experts, the 

VI:. ".7 leler: Lee 11 the rrrcle- ol the Zritish- 

american invasion c; Europe ~ would e an e st I ] one 

million aien. Ihe present British air superi is not yet 

sufficient for an invasion, bs ::ially since it must be expected 
that Sermany will concentrate b Lir Force inwest-rr. Bur ope, 
once the Eastern Front has tee-, stabilised* It will take several 

t .5 -:: e for American air forces to become effective. A basic 
improvement in the maritime transport sit at] :r. is also c:r.= iiered 
necessary. 

Ihe new Japanese Foreign I inister and tiie spokesman :: the general 
Staff issaei si all . tate er.te ; : : at the relations between Japan 
ar.a Bnaaia to which, ace: ling tc press reports from Shanghai, treat 
importance must be attributed. Both emphasised in surprisingly 
similar - tiiat the relations between Japan and the Soviet 

Union will remain unchanged, as l:r. _- as Prussia adheres strictly 
to the existing pact, 

attention and com er.t was arouse- by the statements 
of "1 1 Lnnlsh Envoy at Vashlngton about a separate peace. Official 
Lei : circles are net pet in possession of the text of the 

declaration allereil e st ; , as hi n; ten, but believe it out of 

the question that the Envoy st bout Z- inland's desire to 

:: . :1 _r a separate :e-:e with :he S:riet Vnicn. 



Special Items ; 

I. It was learned from the Air Force General attached to the 
idei In Shief, that the aircraft tender ::mpleted 

-7 the Rotterdam E inand and the one still under construction 

are to be transferred tc : r, according to a decision 

by the . onmander In f, Air Force. 

II. The Japanese Liaison Officer reportei :.-. LI Set. that 
";.irs:h: laete" has roc lee the turn voyage and 
entered the Indian Ocean. On this occasion he expressed once 
more the the tks of the Japanese aval Mission in Germany for the 
cordial reception a:: ;rde i to the Japanese Submarine. 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
22 Sep. lQl+2 

Situation 22 Sep. I9I+2 

I. War in Foreign Yaaters 

1, Enemy Situation : 

South Atlantic : 

It is learned belatedly from the statements made by the 
captain of a ship sunk by a submarine in June that enemy ships 
sailing to the South Atlantic received a written warning to 
watch for German whaling ships in the South Atlantic. Our whalers 
are considered to be scout ships. 

According to an intelligence report, U.S. and British troops of 
all service branches are said to be concentrated at Bomba Mtali 
and Leopo.ldville to be flown from the latter place to the Mediter- 
ranean front in large U.S. transport planes. 

According to an intelligence report from Portugal, the British 
cable -layer MIRROR arrived at Ponta Delgada on 20 Sep., followed 
on 21 Sep. by the British mine sweeper "103", both for provision- 
ing on their way to England. 

Indian Ocean: 

— » 

It is reported from Lourenc o Marques that on 18 Sep. 
a large convoy destined for a northern port dropped anchor there. 
The U~.S. steamer PAUL LUCKENBACH reported on 21 Sep. that she 
was torpedoed at the exit of the Strait of Aden and was continuing 
her voyage slowly. 

As reported by the German Armistice Commission, the British 
forces slowly advancing on Madagascar have not yet made contact 
with the French defense forces at Tananarive. It is learned 
that strong British forces are being massed at 'Brickaville (90 km 
south-30uthwest of Tamatave). The island population Is said to be 
undisturbed and to cooperate without reservation in the defense 
of the island. 

2. Own Situation : 

Ship "28" Is informed by Radiogram 2213 of the award 
of additional medals In recognition of the recently reported 
successes . 

All ships In foreign waters are notified of the WESERLAuD's 
sailing route by Radiogram 1314.6 • . 

See 1/Skl I k 23279 /\\Z Gkdos for instructions to the Fleet Branch 
of the Naval Staff Quartermaster Division concerning the UCKERMARK 
and the VnESERLAND. For copy see War Diary, Part C, Vol, I, 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to an intelligence report received from Portugajl, 



_<•• B-1052 

-257- 



22 Sep. 1QI+2 

6 British motor torpedo boats were sighted at noon of 21 Sep. 6 
miles southeast of Cape St. Vincent. 2 British PT boats and 1 
corvette passed the cape on a northerly course in the evening. 

According to another intelligence report, the American Vice Consul 
at Casablanca is said to have stated that a landing and an offensive 
against ^akar from Gambia is scheduled in about i+ weeks, follow- 
ing the termination of the I.ladagascar operation. The next major 
landing attempt is allegedly planned in about i| to 6 weeks in the 
Gironde. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

On the evening of 21 Sep. a slightly damaged Vnhitney 
plane made an emergency landing south of Brest and was captured. 

Submarine U "600" was slightly damaged by a mine explosion close 
to the hull in water of Jo m. depth, while training outside of 
the shipping channel south of the mouth of the Gironde. It is 
assumed that the mine in question was of the acoustic type. 

Torpedo boat T "13" transferred from La Pallice to Erest for engine 
repairs. 

Channel Coast : 

7 boats of the 6th PT Boat. Flotilla transferred from 
Rotterdam to Ijmuiden. 

The Naval Staff assumes that the damaged torpeao boat JAGUAR will 
be replaced by the FALKE for escorting ship "l^"* 30 that the 
ships assigned to this mission consist of torpedo boat T "25" 
with the Comrander of the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla on board, 
toroedo boat T "22", and the "FALKE". 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation ; 

All mine-sweeping activity had to be cancelled due to 
bad weather. Convoy service was affected for the same reason. 

At ll^c the blast furnace plant of Ijmuiden was attacked by enemy 
planes. Both furnaces were put out of commission. At I505 
another attack took place arainst the same target and the Ijmuiden 
cement plant; also in this case considers le damage was dene. 

2. Norway : 

jestroyer Z "27" reported sighting a bubble track in 



-258- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



22 Sep. I9I4.2 



* 



> 



Alta Fjord off Langnesholm at 1020. Submarine patrols have been 
reinforced. 

Enemy air activity on 21 and 22 Sep. over the Arctic Coast (Alta 
Fjord, Kirkenes, and Vardoe) and over Stavanger. 

3, Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Decoded radio messages revealed that convoy PQ, 18 
called into Gorlo Strait on lS Sep. under escort of 12 planes of 
the 95th Naval Air Regiment. At 1118 of that day the convoy 
was sighted from Kanin Nos, at which time it was still under 
attack by German planes. 3 single ships, probably stragglers, 
were observed north of the convoy, one of which was burning 
while another one was sinking. At 1200 the convoy was reported 
by the Russian planes as consisting of 28 transports and 22 escort 
vessels and its position was given as 68° i+0 * N, 1+2° 1+0 f E. It 
was unfortunately impossible to make out the number of merchant 
vessels reported subsequently at 1310, so that the result of our 
aerial attacks could not be determined precisely. Radio Archangel 
reported at 1312 that Russian fighter planes had taken off. At 
I62I4. the convoy was at 68° 20' N, I4.2 10' E and at I705 at 68° 
05' N, I4.2 00' E. On 20 Sep. the convoy was escorted off Archangel 
by a squadron of the 729th Fighter Regiment. Radio monitoring 
revealed that on 22 Sep., too, fighter planes took off at 112b 
for the protection of PQ 18 which was at Archangel at that time. 

Own Situation ; 

Operation against convoy QP 11+ ; 

5 submarines maintained uninterrupted contact with the 
convoy all night and during the day. The convoy proceeded on 
a southerly course west of Jan Mayen and is probably headed for 
the Denmark Strait. It was last reported at 1959 in quadrant 
AA 9857. According to air reconnaissance, it consisted of 18 
steamers with 3 cruisers, I4. destroyers, and 10 escort vessels. 
It is assumed that the aircraft carrier was withdrawn from the 
convoy during the night of 21 Sep. following an attack on her 
by submarine U "378" at 2329 on 21 Sep. in quadrant AA 69614., 
The submarine had fired a I|.-fan which missed. 

The same submarine missed with another [(.-fan against a destroyer 
in quadrant AA 9316 at 0I4.O5 on 22 Sep. Submarine U "I4.35" (com- 
manded by Lt. Strelow) continued the successful operation begun 
on 20 Sep. by scoring 2 hits on an auxiliary cruiser of 12,000 
GRT and 3 hits on three 8,000 ORT steamers out of 5 shots during 
an attack in quadrant AA 9286 at O719. The sinking of the auxiliary 
cruiser and of one stesne™ was seen and confirmed by hydrophone. 
Subsequently the spots where I4. ships had sunk were observed. 
At 1022 submarine U "I4.08" torpedoed an AFRIDI- class destroyer in 
quadrant AA 9278, the sinking of which was established by 
hydrophone. 

The Admiral, Arctic Ocean suggests that the captain of submarine 
U "I4.35" De mentioned by name in the coming official announcement 
of the results of the operation against convoy QP II4.. The Naval 
Staff forwarded this suggestion to the Executive Office of the 
Commander In Chief, Navy. 



/>e« B-1052 

-259- 



confidential 

ZZ Sep. I9I4.2 

The operation continues. 

Operation "Zarln" : 

Operations order is submitted by the admiral, «-rctic 
Ocean. The object is to mine the area northwest of Novaya Zemiya 
by the HIPPER. Aside from the HIPPER, \\ destroyers under the 
Commander, 5th Destroyer Flotilla are participating in the 
operation. The tactical command is in the hands of the Commanding 
Admiral, Cruisers, the operational command in those of the Admiral, 
Arctic Ocean. The barrage order specifies 7 barrage sections of 
96 type F standard mines, timei. for 60 days and set for a depth 
of 17 m., distance between mines 600 m. For the best location 
of the barrage sections see copy of operations order in Telegram 

OO37. 

The aaval Staff informs Fuehrer Headquarters, with copy to the 
Naval Representative on the Operations Staff, Armed forces High 
Command, of its intention to engage the HIPPER in a mine-laying 
operation off the west coast of Novaya Zemiya following the ter- 
mination of the operation against convoy QP ll; and requests 
that this be brought to the Fuehrer's attention. , 

Group North agreed with the above operations order on condition 

that the operation is called off if the task force is reported 

upon emerging from the inter-island waters and if air reconnaissance 

spots the heavy enemy force still north of 65 N. Otherwise, 

the open t ion is to be carried out. It v is scheduled to begin 

after 2J Sep. following receiot of permission from the Naval 

Staff. 

After Fuehrer Headquarters reported that the Fuehrer had been 
notified, permission for the operation was given to Group North 
by the following telegram: 

"Permission to execute mine-laying operstion replacing "Zar" by 
the HIPPER is granted." 

Thereupon the Admiral, Arctic Ocean orders that the operation 
begin at 2100 of 2J Sep. 

Special Item : 

Group !.orth has assigned a submarine for the transport of a 
weather detachment in the north area. Since the cargo may 
also contain a great number of gasoline containers and several 
hydrogen cylinders, the Group requests a decision whether a 
cargo of this nature is allowed on board a submarine. (See 
Telegram 1553 • ) 

The Naval Staff, Submarine Division is looking into the matter. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

2 ground mines were swept north of Swinemuende, 1 west of 
Kalundborg, 5 in the southern portion of the Great Belt, and 1 
in the southern part of Samsoe belt. Mine-exploding vessels 



-26O- B-1052 



t 



CONrlDE'.TiAL 
22 Sep. 19 i|2 

swept 6 of them by means of cracker equipment (K.K.G.). This 
proves that acoustic mines were used by the enemy also in the a-.'ea 
of the Comianding Admiral, Oeienses, Baltic Sea, Otherwise 
there is nothing to report from the areas of the Commanding 
Admiral, Defenses, Ealtic Sea and the Commander, I.'ine Sweepers, 
Baltic Sea. 



V. Merchant Shipping 



In a conference at the Baltic Naval Station between represent' 
atives of the Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping, tne Naval 
Staff, Operations Division and the Baltic I^aval Station it was 
st-ited once more that even the slightest decrease of the Swedish 
ore supply is intolerable in view of the short time during which 
shipping is still possible. It is considered necessary to 
lift all restrictions immediately. ' The Naval Staff therefore 
advised -roup llorth (copy to Baltic Naval Station and Commander, 

tl.iine Sweepers, Baltic Sea) supplementing the directive of 19 Sep. 
that the Reich Commissioner of Liaritime Shipping also considers 
'intolerable anything that vvould interfere with any Swedish ore 
shipments. The Naval Staff therefore requests Group North to 
see that all such restrictions be lifted at once. 



VI. Submarine warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to radio intelligence, the Norwegian steamer 
MAT-ilLDA was attacked by a submarine in the North Atlantic, 
approximately 300 miles northwest of Newfoundland. According to 
an intelligence report from Portugal, a British corvette sank 
on 19 Sep. 6 miles west of Cape ispichel, i\o further reports 
of any importance were received. 

2. Own Situation : 

See Own Situation, Arctic Ocean for reports on operation^ 
against convoy QP lij.» 

5 submarines are under way to the zone of operations, among them 
3 sailing from Germany for the first time. 

The 3 submarines stationed in the Denmark Strait are transferred 
to the command of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean as of 0300 on 23 
Sep. 3 submarines stationed east of Iceland were transferred 
south of the newly established closed area on 15 Sep. 

The operation in the North Atlantic against the convoy in quadrant 
AK yielded no results yet, because stormy weather (northwest 
wind 10, sea 'J-Q) made any offensive action impossible. 19 sub- 
marines operating in that area were combined into Group "Blitz", 
and are supposed to assume position in a patrol line from quadrant 
AK O3I7 to 7559 by 2^00 of 25 ^ep.; on their way to the newly 
assigned positions they are to exploit any opportunity of attacking 
stragglers. 



-261- 



B-1052 



:: .-i:r:iAi 
22 Se . 1 __ 

211" - tanker of 

LO,OCC In quad] 712, arlne " y.j n of the same 

-, -:e [A5 F0STEX3S r3.00C ~7T) In quadrant 

bc : . 

5_: e 7 -:2" sank s~ (2,9 C ~ In quadrant 

- - . 

: at any sue : : .- : -'- v: i . 

For details see supple : i. : :l:r 1 . .=:••, 

Part B, Vol. IV. 

Accordir. : :: a report the - ~wn Armistice :: I s : I on, the 

JLCIRE nas hurriedly t en on sur:~_-^s at Dakar ar.c is now under 
way tc 2asablai aere she will iiser±>ark Italian survivors 

;;ilitate their trar.s art to Italy. 



__ . .-.t.-I a_ .ar;are 

1. IrizLs'r. Isles a.-.i ViciriTT ; 

70 planes Barrisl cut recsr. aai a sance :11 hts and 
fig • att = c z r. ::.e ::;r« the 1^7. Ihe enemy raided 

anti-air:. aft batteries and industrial Installations in Belgium. 
1£ of importar. :t baa seer, reported. 

2. Be literrar.ear. Theater ; 

Fightei iter =v,ee:s met with nc enemy opposition. 
Ts^s s mm ov ste. At the Egyptian front 

enemy batter! e . concentrations of motorized aq ipment were 

attached with ::_ results and airfields were relied. 

3 • Sa ~- r n Front ; 

51 Bne planes aere shot down at the various Army 
sectors. 

Reconns' fli hts over the Black Sea and the rotic Ocean. 

11 Ju 'i laid mines ir. the harbor of Archangel on 21 Sep. 
2 lar~e stc ff r Cape Kir bey; results were not 

: . 1 re 3 . 

_: :. -ion, Arctic Ocean for report on operations against 
convoy ..? 1_. 



VIII. ..ar:"a:r jr. ::.r --= LL terra.-.ea:-. a.-.i the :'.::'.: Sea 
1« .-.e.--- i, '. -.I..-., . li t- rrsr.-a.-. : 

1 enemy planes we ted at Gibraltar. 

8 nc enemy reports of any importance. 

-262- *" 



> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2.2. Sep. 19^2 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

During the night of 20 Sep, an enemy submarine off 
the Tunisian east coast fired on 2 Italian motor mine sweepers, 
one of which was sunk. No report was received about the other 
one. The same enemy submarine sank the Frenoh steamer LIBERIA, 
proceeding from Tunis to Sfax on 22 Sep. 

A heavy enemy air raid on Benghazi took place between 1825 and 
I8I4.O. As reported by the Benghazi Shipping and Transport Office, 
steamer APUANIA with a cargo of German ammunition exploded and 
other vessels were damaged. The Floria Stalia pier was destroyed. 
Losses of personnel are heavy. Darkness prevented exact deter- 
mination of the amount of damage. 

Upon request of the Commanding Admiral, German Naval Command, 
Italy the Commanding General, Armed Forces, South addressed the 
following communication to the Italian High Command: 

"Should the British attempt to renew their operations for the 
supply of Malta, our defense would find itself in the most un- 
favorable situation if the following events took place: 

"a. Simultaneous departure of convoys from Alexandria and 
Gibraltar. 

"b. A simultaneous offensive of the British 8th Army against 
the Panzer Army while our air bases in Africa, Crete,, Sicily and 
Sardinia were paralyzed. 

H c. A simultaneous offensive against parts of the Italian 
Navy which might constitute a threat to the British convoys. In 
this case neither the Commanding General South nor, in my opinion, 
the Italian Air Force Command is in a position to destroy both of 
the convoys or to prevent at least the bulk of them from reaching 
Malta. This would be all the more impossible if the weather 
situation rendered reconnaissance and air attacks difficult. It 
is my opinion that,^ irrespective of strongest support of the 
operations against both convoys by the Air Force, the Italian 
Navy must participate. As far as I can judge, the conditions 
for cooperation by the Italian Navy are more unfavorable in the 
case of the western convoy. The battle against this convoy should 
be fought only by'the Air Force, supported by submarines, PT 
boats and subchasers. As to the eastern convoy, however, the 
participation of the Italian fleet from the flanking position 
Greece-Crete -Rhodes could be of decisive value. Air protection 
could be furnished by Me 110 and Ju 88 night fighters from Crete 
and North Africa to an extent which, while offering no absolute 
protection against all types of enemy planes, could provide a 
minimum of protection in view of the number and type of our 
planes compared with the enemy's bomber and fighter planes.' 

I request examination of this matter and a decision so as to be 
able to take all necessary measures well In advance." 

This step meets with the fullest approval of the 
Naval Staff. 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
22 Sep. 19l|.2 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Steamer PALOMBA was refloated and continued on the way 
to Tripoli. 

The convoy3 of the PROSERPINA and the SESTRIERE were attacked by 
enemy planes on the evening of 22. Sep. Details are not known as 
yet. 

Otherwise, supply transports and coastal shipping proceeded 
according to plan. 

1|. Area Naval Group South ; 

Aegean Sea ; 

In the evening a submarine was sighted from land 13 
miles east of Candia. The escorted tanker CAUCASO was sp6tted by 
enemy air reconnaissance during the forenoon west of the Cerigotto 
Passage while, proceeding from Benghazi to Piraeus. Otherwise nothing 
to report. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

An intelligence report from Bulgaria asserts that the 
Russian Black Sea fleet would under no circumstances scuttle 
Its ships but would put into Turkish ports; such events are how- 
ever still very remote. It would continue to operate from Turkish 
ports exactly like the German and Italian ships operate against 
Russia from Bulgaria. 

This could Just be propaganda connected with the 
current disagreements between Bulgaria and Russia. 

According to radio intelligence, 1 submarine tender and II4. sub- 
marines were at sea in unidentified positions, among them 3 °r 
1^. in the western part of the Black Sea. Air reconnaissance 
located 3 northbound and 1 southbound escorted steamers off the 
Caucasian coast on 22 Sep. It seems that some convoys are calling 
at Sochi and Gagry at night whence they proceed in daytime only. 
Enemy Shipping off the Caucasian coast is also protected by 
flying boats. 

Own situation ; 

At noon of 21 Sep. a German convoy was unsuccessfully 
attacked with torpedoes twice by an enemy submarine off Yalta. 
It is believed that aerial mines were laid off Cape Takil (Kerch 
Strait) during the night of 21 Sep. No damage resulted from 
an enemy air raid on Anapa. 

Convoy operation on 21 Sep. suffered from bad weather. 

Group South repeats its reminder to the Naval Staff (with copies 
to Army Group A and the Naval Liaison Officer at the High Command, 
Army) that the time has come to deal the final blow to the Russian 
fleet, lest its activity cause severe damage to German operations 
and German supply shipping. For copy of telegram see l/Skl 



-264- 



B-1052 



^ 



CONFIDENTIAL 
22 Sep. 191+2 

235I4.8A2 Gkdos. In War Diary, Part C, Vol. XIV a* 



IX. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A ;' 

German and Rumanian units went over to the offensive south- 
east of Novorossisk. An enemy attack northeast of Tuapse was re- 
pulsed. The 3 rd Panzer Division Is engaged in hitter fighting in 
the Isherskaya area against fresh enemy tank forces. 

Army Group B t 

The see-saw hat tie for the possession of Stalingrad 
continues. Our attack at the penetration point south of Voronezh 
resulted in a bitter battle which is still in progress. At the 
Don River bend at Olkhovatka the enemy succeeded in breaking 
through our main defense line. A counterattack for the relief 
of our forces encircled in a forest made no headway. 

Central Army Group ; 

Our counterattack against enemy forces which penetrated 
into the Rzhev city park is slowly gaining ground. In the 
Demidov area the enemy was forced to withdraw to the northo 

Northern Army Group : 

Enemy attacks against the strip of land leading to the 
II Army Corps continued. At the sector south of Schluesselburg 
we captured the important hillsides north of Totolovo. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

Enemy pressure made it necessary to abandon our fortified 
position at Rugozero near Maselskaya. Enemy attacks on the Kanda- 
laksha sector were repulsed. Enemy forces which had penetrated 
into the northern flank of the XXXVI Mountain Corps were dispersed. 
An enemy detachment of 2 batallions at the northern end of the 
front suffered the same fate. 

3« North Africa : 

Normal artillery and reconnaissance activity* At the 
present time I93 German and I35 Italian tanks are ready for 
operation. 



-265- B-105 2 



cc::~ : v: :t:ai 

23 Se 42 

Items of :ical Inoortance 

— — - — i 

;sia : 

On the basis of a report from a Moscow correspondent, the British naga- 
sine hew Statesman and Nation calls attention to the resentment of the 
Russian people due to the failure to establish a second front. Pravda 
La reported to have published a sarcastic cartoon. It is significant 

Russian newspapers did not even comment on Churchill's 
visit. Moscow circles still maintain that the British made a binding 
promise regard he second front. 

Trance: 

The German Ambassador reports as follows: 

Laval authc i i the Minister of Production and the Minister of Labor 
to iss e regulations concerning the c-m~ulsorv labor law in crier to re - 
lease French labor for transfer to Germany . As a result of discussions 
with Laval, Gauleiter Sauckel fixed the 15th of October as the ultimate 
date for the arrival of 150,000 skilled workers in Germany. If this 
deadline is met, he, in turn, will be willing to arrange that 50,000 
farmers now prisoners of war are released at that time and will see to 
it that, starting now, an exchange is initiated in a ratio of 3,000 to 
1,000. Half of the 200,000 unskilled workers to be furnished by France 
are to be placed at the disposal of the Todt Organization for work in 
France. 

Spain : 

At the conclusion of the session of the Council of Ministers on 21 Sep. 
the following official announcement was made: 

e Council c: hsters reasserts its adherence to the principals guid- 
foreign policy for the last 6 years, which follow the line of an 
anti-communist crusade and conform to the laws of the new European 
craer. -he Council reaffirms Spain's close friendship with Portugal and 
her -.raaitional solidarity with the La tin -American countries. Spain has 
^roved her defenses. The political unity of all Spaniards is to be 
ained and they will observe strictest discipline and respect of the 
s Government will fight any attempted agitation or revolt and 
will ruthlessly stamp out any assaults on the authority and prestige of 
the State. 

Portugal : 

German Legation at Lisbon reports that, while pressure is being put 
on Portugal by the refusal of navicerts, the Brazilian Minister has pro- 
posed to the Portuguese government that Portugal lease the Portuguese 

ic insular possessions on a lend-lease basis to Brazil for the 
duration of the war in return for free imports from Brazil to Portugal. 
The German Legation considers it unlikely that Salazar will accept this 
proposition. It can, however, be expected that the U.S.A. will bring 

:reased pressure to bear on Portugal, either directly or through 
Brazil. 

Brazil ; 

It Is learned from diplomatic sources that U.S. activity is concentrated 
in the northern Brazilian states of Pernambuco, Parahyba, Rio Grande 
del Norte and Ceara. Brazilian military circles believe that an offen- 



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CONFIDENTIAL 



23 Sep. 1942 



* 



* 



sive toward Africa will be launched from these areas, and that this is 
the reason for the massing of U.S. war material, and Brazilian and U.S. 
troops and ships, and for the construction of air bases. Up to the 
present time, there is no indication that Brazil has asked Portugal for 
permission to occupy the Azores. 

Authoritative Brazilian military circles consider formal cooperation 
with the U.S.A. the best means to provide the Brazilian armed forces with 
the latest armament. Vargas and Aranha carry full responsibility for the 
declaration of war, while the Army, its armament modernized as the re- 
sult of the war, is in a position to assume the leading role, irrespective 
of the outcome of the war. In the event of an Axis victory, the mili- 
tary will always be in a position to disclaim responsibility for enter- 
ing the war and to take over the Government. 

Finland : 

Authoritative Washington circles declared that there is no basis for the 
assumption that Finland is trying to make a separate peace with Russia. 
The statement made by the Finnish Minister was misinterpreted. 



Soecial Items 

I. The Naval Staff Operations Division released new data concerning the 
enemy situation : 

a. Regarding bases and harbors of Great Britain and Northern 
Ireland as of the beginning of September 1942. For copy no. 11 see 
1/Skl 32326/42 geh. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. lib. 

b. Regarding the sinking of aircraft carrier YORKTOY.N according 
to the report of the U.S. Navy Department of 16 Sep. For copy no. 4 see 
1/Skl 32029/42 geh. in Oar Diary/ Part C, Vol. XVII. 

c. Regarding tasks, organization and evaluation of the U.S. Navy. 
The analysis permits the conclusion that the- well-known split of the na- 
val forces will continue until sufficient heavy ships are available for 
offensive action (1944). Up to this time offensive operations by or 
under the protection of the U.S. Navy will take place only in proportion 
to the anticipated strength of the defenses. No large-scale naval 
battle is to be expected in the Aleutians or any other part of the 
Pacific. 

For copy no. 3 of this very interesting review see l/Skl 32100/42 geh. in 
V/ar Diary, Part C, Vol. XVII. 

d. Regarding the operations of Russian submarines in the Baltic 
Sea outside the Gulf of Finland from the middle of June to the middle of 
September 1942 and regarding the appointment of a Russian Naval Attache 
for Stockholm. 

For copy no. 3 of this report see l/Skl 32009/42 geh. in War Diary, Part 
C, Vol. III. 

II. In view of the experience had from the incident at the Casquets, the 
Fuehrer orders that the garrisons, the armament and defense installations 
of all similar outposts located on small rocky islands be reinforced. 



-267- 8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
23 Sep. 1942 

The Naval Staff therefore issues the following directive to Group 
North, the Commanding Admiral, Norway, Group South, and the Admiral, 
Aegean Sea; 

The garrisons must be of adequate size to provide for uninterrupted 
guard duty, and defense installations and armament must be sufficient 
to repel enemy raids. All strong points in Norway and in the Aegean 
Sea are to be checked for compliance with above requirements. All 
necessary measures are to be taken. Reports to this effect to be 
submitted to the Naval Staff by 30 Sep. 1942. 



Situation 23 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation ; 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo forwards statements by a Hindu 
prisoner from the captured ALIIAIDA, who asserts that German vessels 
were at Goa in July 1941 in Kormugao harbor, opposite San Salvador: 
they could be reached from land within 5 minutes by rowboats. The 
crews were able to land at the beach south of the anchorage by sail- 
boats without being detected and could reach San Salvador. 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo further reports that ship "10" passed 
Sunda Strait at 1700 of 22 Sep. 

Following up the report received from ship "23" (see War Diary 21 Sep.) 

the auxiliary cruiser is instructed by Telegram 0510 (also for the 
information of the UCKERKARK) to replenish her fuel supply fully from 
the UCKERI.LARK. The fact that the short signal v/as transmitted leads 
the Naval Staff to believe that ship "23" met the TANNENFELS and 
probably also ship "28", and that the TANNENFELS started north on 21 
Sep. Only if this assumption is incorrect, ship "25 n is requested to 
report as convenient when the TANNENFELS was dismissed. 

The TANNENFELS is instructed by Radiogram 2214 to arrange her return 
voyage so as not to cross longitude 30° V before dawn of 8 Oct. 

The Naval Staff wired to the Naval Attache at Tokyo for his informa- 
tion as follows: 

a. The Japanese Admiralty stated by way of the Naval Attache at 
Berlin that the Japanese Navy intends to use the Indian Ocean zone of 
operation assigned to German auxiliary cruisers, as long as no German 
ships are operating there. The Naval Staff requested the Japanese Na- 
val Attache to ask the Japanese Navy to notify them as soon as Japan 

is no longer using this zone. Our intention to resume auxiliary 
cruiser operations in that area approximately at the end of November 
has been communicated to the Japanese Attache. 

b. Our renewed request for an operations zone for a German 
auxiliary cruiser in the South Pacific, submitted by way of Nomura, was 
refused by the Japanese Navy. Japan prefers to have a German auxiliary 



-268- B " 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 



> 



> 



23 Sep. 1942 



cruiser in the Indian Ocean. Additional remark by Naval Staff: Follow-) 
ing the arrival of ship "10", discuss with the captain the problem of 
the Indian Ocean operations zone. On the basis of his experience try 
to persuade the Japanese Navy to agree to a definite operations zone. 
(See Telegram 0010. ) 

Enemy situation report by Radiogram 2123. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

According to an intelligence report received from Belgium, 
the inhabitants of V/estende-Bains expect a British landing on 24 Sep. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

Evaluation of reports from French fishing vessels reveals 
that a number of spherical mines was found in the nets on 12 and 20 
Sep. in quadrant BF 6877 (50 miles west of the mouth of the Gironde). 
2 mines exploded. 

Channel Coast : 

Nothing to report. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

The Ijmuiden steel plant was badly damaged during the reported 
air raid of 22 Sep. and production will probably be interrupted for 
several months. 

Convoy activity suffered from continued bad weather and in some cases 
had to be cancelled. 

Special Items : 

On 23 Jun. 1942 the Naval Staff called the attention of the Reich Com- 
missioner of Maritime Shipping to the increased danger to shipping in 
the North Sea, suggesting that at least some of the North Sea trans- 
ports be shifted to inland waterways and that it be investigated to 
what degree the Dutch inland waterways and the port of Delfzijl could 
be used to alleviate the congestion on the route to Rotterdam. 

On 18 Sep. the Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping replied as fol- 
lows: 

Economic reasons speak against the use of Delfzijl harbor (as this wouljd 
involve a delay of 9 days, due to the necessity of transporting coal 
there). Experience shows that ships are particularly endangered be- 
tween Ameland and Heligoland, so that the proposed shift would In no 



-269- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



23 S - 

way diminish the risk in this respect. 

The Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping is taking all necessary 
steps to reduce traffic by sea to Rotterdam by improving unloading 
facilities and increasing railroad capacity at the German North Sea 
ports. 

The Naval Staff Operations Division is investigating the 
naval side of the matter. 

2. Norway : 

3atteries on Rybachi Peninsula fired at a westbound convoy 
off Petsamo and Nurmansaetti without causing any damage. An eastbound 
convoy was attacked by 3 torpedoes ' which missed by an enemy submarine 
south of Kyberg; 3 subchasers went out in pursuit. Lively enemy air 
activity over the Arctic coast, presumably to gain information about the 
ships anchored in Alta Fjord. It is suspected that aerial mines were 
laid off Kavnir.gsberg. Convoy service proceeded according to plan. 

The mine-laying vessels ROLAND and SKAGERRAK laid 2 deep angle-patterned 
barrages of anti-submarine mines type B in single rov/s for the pro- 
tection of the convoy route off the southwestern coast. For report on 
the location of the minefield see Telegram 1120. 5 detonations took 
place during the laying of the second minefield. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

Radio monitoring established the presence of 8 or 10 British 
ships in the Archangel area. A Russian submarine and another submarine 
of unidentified nationality were located at sea. The 10th Royal Air 
Force Group was observed in the Murmansk area. 

According to air reconnaissance, 1 light cruiser and 3 destroyers were 
anchored in Reidar Fjord on 22 Sep. At 1028 on 22 Sep. it was observed 
that a submarine torpedoed and sank an 8,000 GRT steamer of convoy QP 
14 and a destroyer was damaged at 1220. 

On 23 Sep. convoy QP 14 was spotted by a submarine at 0309 in quadrant 
AE 2374 and at 0533 in quadrant AE 2297; it was reported on a southerly 
course and evidently heading for Denmark Strait. 

Own Situation : 

a. Operation against QP 14 ; 

At 0330 the Admiral, Arctic Ocean took over command of the 3 
submarines operating west of Iceland but the submarines were unable to 
close in on the convoy in time. They were therefore assigned to new- 
attack positions in quadrant AE 17 and were returned to the command of 
the Commanding Admiral, Submarines. 

8 submarines closed in on convoy QP 14. Submarines U "705" and U "251" 
report torpedo misses against steamers of the convoy. 6 submarines 
which reached 67° N 22° W, the extreme end of the zone of operation, 
turned back as ordered and submitted their reports. Convoy QP 14 was 
last reported at 1315 approximately 90 miles northwest of Iceland. 



-270- B " 1052 



y 



y 



CONFIDENTIAL 
23 Sep. 1942 

b * Successoa against PQ, 18 : 

A check of all data in the Naval Staff's possession discloses 
that a maximum of 23 merchant vessels out of the 45 which assumedly 
made up convoy PQ, 18 did not reach their destinations, whereas the com- 
munique of the Armed Forces High Command dated 20 Sep. announced the 
sinking of 38 merchant vessels, viz., the virtual annihilation of the 
convoy. In view of this gross discrepancy the Naval Staff requests the 
Operations Staffs of the Armed Forces High Command and of the Air Force 
through the Naval Liaison Officers for information in their possession. 

See Telegram l/Skl I b 23437/42 Gkdos. in file "Eispalast". 

c. The beginning of operation "Zarin" was postponed by the Ad- 
rairl, Arctic Ocean for 24 hours due to bad weather. 

d. The mine-laying operation in the Iceland area by submarine 

U "117" will take place at 0000 of 26 Sep. at the earliest, in order to 
ensure that all submarines have left the area. 

e. The Commanding Admiral, Submarines granted special permission 
that the submarine assigned to weather service (see War Diary 12 Sep.) 
may load gasoline containers and hydrogen cylinders, since it is hardly 
to be expected that she will be attacked with depth charges. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

The German auxiliary sailing ship HEIMAT sank in quadrant AO 7371 
and the Danish schooner SARA in quadrant AO 7344, after striking mines 
In the case of the HEIMAT 3 mines detonated simultaneously, indicating 
acoustic mines. 

Tanker MITTELMEER, carrying aviation gasoline, joined a northbound 
troop transport at Libau. 

Nothing to report from the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic 
Sea. 

Past experience showed that it is not feasible to seal' the Gulf Q f Fin- 
land with minefields and the available vessels against breakthrough 
attempts by Russian submarines; the Naval Staff therefore assigned 20 of 
the first armed trawlers becoming available in Germany to Group North 
to be used as subchasers for this purpose. 

In the event that we should not succeed in completely eliminating the 
Russian Baltic fleet this year, it will be necessary to provide sound 
detectors and additional armed trawlers as subchasers next spring to 
close off the Gulf of Finland. 

For corresponding directive to Group North and the Naval Staff Quarter- 
master Division see Telegram 1717. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation: 

Lively reconnaissance activity on the part of the 15th Air 

-271- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
23 Sep. I?k2 

Force Group, and the Home and Iceland squadrons. A message was in- 
tercepted concerning the torpedoing of steamer PfiHNMAR which is 
part of the convoy approaching in the North Atlantic. 

Otherwise nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation ; 

2 submarines have left for the zone of operations. 

Regarding operations against convoy QF llj. and other activities in 
the Arctic Ocean see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

In the course of operations by Group "Blitz" in the Atlantic, sub- 
marine U "617" sank a 9,000 to 10,000 GET tanker and a straggler of 
5,500 GBT from the convoy In quadrant AK 3955. Contact withfthe 

voy was later lost. At 2212 submarine U "258" contacted a convoy 
sailing on a 7O course in quadrant. AK 3555* which is probably the 
one lost sight of in the forenoon. All submarines of Group "Blitz" 
which are able to establish contact with It by the evening of 2l+ 
Sep. are ordered to attack this convoy. Submarine "256 scored 3 
hits at midnight on several overlapping ships in quadrant AK 35&+ 
and reports a burst of flames; the Commanding Admiral, Submarines 
credits the boat with sinking 5»°°0 GET and 1 torpedo hit. 

Submarine U "380" established contact with e convoy on a northeasterly 
course in quadrant BC 3^4-21 during the forenoon and all other boats of 
Group "Vorwaerts" are ordered to converge on it. The submarines of 
Group "Blitz" which are unable to operate against the convoy inter- 
cepted by submarine U "258" are ordered to participate in this action, 
too-. No results were reported against this convoy, which turned 
abruptly to the north. 

Submarine U "14.55" carried out the assigned minelayinr operation off 
the U.S. eastern coast. 

Submarine U "512" sank a 7,500 GET steamer on 16 Sep. in the V.est 
Indies in quadrant EE I4J+23 # which is unfortunately probably the 
Spanish steamer MONTE GORBEA. For details of this Incident see 
War Diary, Part C, Vol. VIII. 

Submarine U "125" of the South Atlantic Group "litis" sank steamer 
BEDGEEE (5,355 GET) in quadrant ET. 

For additional reports see supplement to submarine situation in V.ar 
Diary, Part E, Vol. IV. 

According to a communication from tiie German Armistice Commission, the 
GLOIPE disembarked 3 sick Italians at Dakar and is proceeding to Casa- 
blanca with 37O Italians and 668 Britishers, among them 50 women and 
children. Gunboat ANNAKITE is under way to Dakar with [j.1 Italians and 
111 Britishers. Gunboat DUMONT D'URVILLE has no more survivors aboard 
and is returning to Porte Boue after a futile search. 

The GLOIRE established that the LACONIA had 1,600 Britishers and 1,000 
Italians on board at the time of her sinking; I4.IU Italians and 682 
British were saved. British planes repeatedly circled over the GLOIRE 
without incident. 

The Naval Staff requested that the Foreign Office permit operations in 
a 20 mile strip along the Brazilian coast. To this the Foreign Office 



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8-1052 



> 



> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
23 Sep. 1942 

objects. The Naval Staff Intends, however, to insist that at least 
operations be permitted up to the latitude of Natal; the Commanding 
Admiral, Submarines is requested to report on the following: 

a. The possibilities for operations in a 20 miles strip. 

b. The adverse effect on our submarine operations which refusal 
to release this strip would have. 

According to information from the Naval Staff, Submarine Division, all 
VII C type submarines are being equipped for the time being with 2 
model 151 machine guns in box-trail carriages and 1 single-barreled 
2 cm machine gun for antiaircraft protection. Later it is planned to 
equip new submarines and thereafter if possible, also submarines al- 
ready in operation with cylinder carriages. However, this will not be 
possible before a year from now. Ultimately, VII C type submarines 
will receive antiaircraft armament consisting of: 

2 model 151 machine guns on cylinder carriages 
1 double-barreled 2 cm machine gun. 

Similar armament is planned for submarines of types IX, XB, and XIV 
but this depends upon whether an autogyro observation kite will be put 
on board them or not. 

The sooner submarines are in a position to defend them- 
selves effectively against aerial attacks the better. 
The Naval Staff welcomes this development in view of itfc 
expected tactical advantages. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Incursions : 

During the night of 23 Sep. 136 enemy planes. flew over our 
territory, 85 of them penetrating into Germany. 10 planes were shot , 
down. Attacks were made in an area extending from Heligoland and 
Bremen to Schleswig-Holstein. Bombs were dropped on Wilhelmshaven, 
Plensburg, Hamburg, and Wismar. For details see Daily situation report 

La Pallice was strafed and attacked with demolition bombs. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

See Own Situation, Mediterranean for report on the effect of 
enemy air raids on Benghazi. 

Missions flown by our air forces had no results of any Importance. 
Alexandria and Suez were reconnoitered by photo reconnaissance. For 
results see Enemy Situation, Mediterranean. 

4. Eastern Front : 

A 5,000 GRT steamer was damaged during an air attack on Adlerl, 
Rec o nnai ss ance -activity In the Black Sea and Caspian Sea". 

-273- 

B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
23 Sep. 1942 

Regarding operation against QP 14 see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. Some 
ships of this convoy are apparently carrying lumber. 



VII. Y/arfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation. Mediterranean ; 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, an agent re- 
ported from London on 15 Sep. that a large convoy with war material 
was being assembled off the Isle of Man. Its escort consists of 
planes and warships, Including an aircraft carrier. The convoy is re- 
portedly expected to arrive in the Mediterranean (Egypt) around 19 Oct, 

According to intercepted radio messages, the convoyed steamer SESTRIEKE 
was spotted by air reconnaissance southeast of Cape Santa Maria di 
Leuca at 0135 and was attacked between 0200 and 0300. An escort de- 
stroyer reports an attack on the escorted tanker PROSERPINA at 1840 of 
22 Sep. 45 miles northwest of Cape Ducat o by 10 torpedo planes. Radio 
monitoring also intercepted a message from the escorted tanker R0NDINE, 
en route to Tobruk, at 1423 10 miles west of Crete. 

According to photo reconnaissance, the following ships were at the 
various harbors of Suez: 45 steamers (214,500 GRT), 3 tankers (10,500 
GRT), 1 transport (36,000 GRT). In addition light naval forces. 

2. Own Situation. Mediterranean : 

Porto Empedocle was attacked by enemy planes in the evening 
of 23 Sqp . During the night of 22 Sep. the heavy air attacks on 
Benghazi were renewed. For the report of the Shipping and Transport 
Office at Benghazi on the heavy damage caused by the raids of 22 Sep. 
see Telegram 1315. 

The German Armistice Commission reports that the French believe the 
steamer LIBERIA was sunk by enemy submarines on her run to Sfax be- 
cause the ship was being handed over to the Germans. The LIBERIA be- 
longed to the first group of ships to be handed over. (See Telegram 
1200.) 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 

No details are known about the identity of the convoys at- 
tacked. Supply operations and coastal shipping proceeded on the whole 
according to plan. For details see Telegram 1210. 

The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, Shipping and Transport Branch 
has compiled the following data: 

Total tonnage unloaded at Tripoli during August 1942: 3,012 tons 
German goods amounted to: 

Total tonnage loaded at Tripoli: 6,573 tons 

German goods amounted to: 2,473 tons 

Total tonnage unloaded at Benghazi during August 1942: 26,602 tons 
German goods amounted to: 8,777 tons 

Total tonnage loaded at Benghazi: 13,097 tons 

German goods amounted to: 8,479 tons 



-27*- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



> 



^ 



23 Sep. 1942 



Total tonnage unloaded at Tooruk during July 19 42: during August 1942: 

* 

18,258 tons 29,983 tons 
German goods amounted to: 18,258 tons 17,251 tons 

Total loaded: 3,832 tons 6,763 tons 

German goods amounted to: 3,832 tons 4,069 tons 

The amount of unloadings and loadings and its increase during August 
must be attributed primarily to the fact that German unloading equip- 
ment was available. 

The compilation proves that only about 50$ of the 
supply requirements of the Panzer Army were met. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea ; 

Nothing to report. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing of importance was learned from air reconnaissance in 
the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea. 

Own Situation: 



Sep, 



Nothing to report, except enemy air raids on Feodosiya on 22 



VIII. Situation East Asia 

U.S. Navy Secretary Knox warned in his press conference that the 
situation in the Pacific should not be judged too optimistically and 
announced that the Japanese have definitely crossed the Owen Stanley 
Range on New Guinea so that Fort Moresby is gravely threatened. 

A U.S. Navy Department communique announces that U.S. Array bombers 
attacked the Island of Gizo and the shore installations in Rekata Bay 
on 19 Sep. Dive bombers inflicted damage to a Japanese cruiser north- 
west of Guadalcanal. U.S. positions on Guadalcanal are reported un- 
impaired. 

On the other hand it is reported by Domei News Agency that the U.S. 
forces which had landed on the Solomon Islands were virtually annihil- 
ated. 

Japanese reconnaissance activity over the Indian area (Bengal and the 
provinces of Bihar and Orissa) was resumed as the monsoon period is 
nearing its end. The Royal Air Force and the Indian Air Force are ex- 
pecting reinforcements. 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
23 Sep. 1942 

IX, Army Situation 

l a Russian Front ; 

Army Group A ; 

Due to interruption of communication lines no reports have 
been received. 

Army Group B t 

The situation remained essentially unchanged. For details 
see daily situation report. 

Central Army Group : 

It can be assumed that the enemy will be reinforced by re- 
serves in the Sukhinichi area. 300 to 400 parachutists were dropped in 
the 9th Army area but their whereabouts has not yet been discovered. 
The enemy advance in the penetration point at Rzhev was halted. Our 
operations north of Demidov proceeded according to plan. Several lo- 
calities were captured. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Our advance south of Schluesselburg made only small progress 
in the face of strong enemy resistance. A new attack on Gaitolovo is 
in progress. 

2. Finnish Front : 

Long-range patrol activity on both sides at the southeastern 
front sector. Major German forces began an offensive at the northeastern 
sector. 

3. North Africa : 

Reports have not yet been received. 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain ; 

In a message addressed to a convention of the shipbuilding industry 
Churchill declared that the shipping situation continues grave in 
spite of a recent improvement. 

According to neuter, the British Radio broadcast a message to Prance 
on 23 Sep. recommending that the population evacuate the coastal areas 
because the Allied offensive is in the offing. No announcement of 
time and place of the attack will be made beforehand. When the time 
is ripe, the French population will be called upon to cooperate. The 
offensive will comprise landings on French soil as v/ell as naval op- 
erations in French territorial waters. 

The German News Agency (DNB) reports that American disapproval of the 
British policy toward India is clearly reflected by several articles 
of U.S. correspondents of London newspapers. 

Sweden : 

The German Legation reports that recent Increased German criticism of 
Sweden's attitude has not failed to make an impression in Stockholm 
circles. 

Russia ; 

The Russian Off icial .News Agency Tass was authorized to state that the 
reports about alleged Russian air attacks on Bulgarian towns were 
invented for the purpose of provocation. 

U.S.A. : 

Reports from a neutral diplomatic source describe the state of mind 
prevailing in the U.S.A. as follows: 

The attack on Pearl Harbor made a tremendous impression on the entire 
population and radically changed their attitude toward the war, which 
they expect to win in 1944. Germany is considered the principal ad- 
versary and only following her defeat will the account with Japan be 
settled. It is generally agreed that it is necessary to establish a 
second front; at the same time, however, the opinion is voiced that 
the U.S.A. should occupy the European trouble spots and take an active 
part in reorganizing Europe. During discussions about this subject 
American arrogance is making itself felt most disagreeably, also to- 
ward Great Britain. There is an imperialistic will to take over 
Europe's heritage. America's war machinery is getting into full stride 
and can no longer be stopped. Life in the U.S.A. is normal on the 
whole, whereas shortages are becoming evident in Canada. Anti-semitism 
is increasing, because the Jews are occuping the positions vacated 
by drafted soldiers. The achievements of the German Armed Forces are 
admired. 

China ; 

According to a press dispatch from Shanghai, the Chinese Government is 
trying to eliminate the dominating Russian influence in the important 
northwestern province of Sinkiang in order to shift the main Chinese 
forces more to the northwest. This province, which once was purely 
Chinese, has come more and more under Pnssian influence since World Wai* 



_277- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

I and has repeatedly been a stronghold of the Communist Army. Chinese 
Communists even now oppose all efforts in this direction on the part 
of the Chungking Government. 



Conference on the Situation with the Chief, Naval Staff 

The Chief, Naval Staff who is on leave in Berlin between 14 Sep. and 
4 Oct.," informed himself in detail about the situation. 

The Chief, Quartermaster Division, Naval Staff reported on the arma- 
ment of the new fleet torpedo boat model 41. In accordance with the 
viewpoint taken by the Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff the 
final decision about the gun calibers was deferred until construction 
has progressed sufficiently, in order to utilize additional experience 
which may be gained meanwhile. To prevent any loss of time, 10.6 cm 
as well as 12.7 cm guns are being prepared for the above-named class 
of ships. 

Special Item : 

Evaluation of information obtained by the radio decoding and intercept 
services during the period from 14 Sep. to 20 Sep. 1942 is contained in 
Radio Intelligence Report No. 38/42 of the Chief, Naval Communications 
Division, Communications Intelligence Branch. 



Situation 24 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo reports that the REGENSBURG 
arrived at Balik Papan on 23 Sep., will leave on 24 Sep., and is 
scheduled to arrive at Batavia in the forenoon of 27 Sep. 

The Naval Staff informs ship "10" by Radiogram 0721 about the receipt 
of the Tokyo Naval Attache's message reporting passing of Sunda Strait 
by ship "10" on 22 Sep. 

Ships n 23" and "28" are instructed by the Naval Staff about the names 
of enemy ships suitable for cover names. See Radiograms 1854 and 2159 . 

The Naval Staff notifies the CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN by Radiogram 2035 of 
the following cable received from the Naval Attache at Tokyo; 

(1) I welcome the ship upon her arrival in the area under my authority. 

(2) Japanese coast guard and air reconnaissance services are Inferior 
to those of Germany. You must be prepared for enemy submarines and be 
on the lookout. 



-278- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

(3) Proceed from Singapore to Yokohama. Wire your expected arrival 
there prior to sailing from Singapore. 

(4) While proceeding to Japan carry out tests with undiluted Tarakan 
oil. 

Remark to item 4 by the Naval Staff: 

The tests are to be made first with the auxiliary engines, then with 
the main engines. Prior to the auxiliary engine tests with pure 
Tarakan oil, use a mixture of gas and Tarakan oil and increase the 
Tarakan oil component gradually. Watch sedimentation. Avoid damage 
to engines. 

See Radiogram 2216 for notification of the CHARLOTTE SCHLIEMANN with 
regard to war decorations awarded by the Commander in Chief, Navy for 
courageous discharge of supply tasks on the high seas over a period of 
many months and under difficult conditions and thereby making it 
possible to wage auxiliary cruiser warfare. 

The TANNENFELS is instructed by Telegram 0218 that the order of 23 Sep, 
as per Radiogram 2214 will go into effect after the ship has passed 
point "Trosse". 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo is instructed by Telegram 2330 to give the 
Japanese Admiralty confidential information that a German submarine 
force will appear in the vicinity of Capetown about 1 Oct. The boats 
will operate in the eastern South Atlantic on their return voyage. The 
Attache is to request the Japanese Navy to instruct its forces of this 
fact only if they operate in that area. The Japanese Naval Attache at 
Berlin receives the same information from the Naval Staff. 

All ships in foreign waters are informed by the Naval Staff about the 
Turkish situation. See Radiogram 1134. 

Enemy situation report by Radiograms 0535 and 1307. 

See 1/Skl I K 1890/42 Gkdos. Chefs, (copy no. 1) in War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. I about a survey of the zones of operations and the achievements 
of the auxiliary cruisers during the spring of 1942. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

2 ground mines were swept off the mouth of the Gironde. Mine- 
exploding vessel I was damaged and is temporarily out of commission. 
The Loire River mouth was closed to shipping on account of suspected 
mines. An enemy plane was shot down off Isle de Groix. 

Channel Coast : 

Nothing to report except an enemy plane shot down off Boulogne 

-279" B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

III. North Sea, Norway. Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

Lively enemy air activity developed over the coastal area 
of the German Bight during the night of 23 Sep.; the attacks were not 
concentrated on any one area, but were evidently for mine-laying and 
general harassing purposes. Slight damage was inflicted on the Navy 
Yard at Wilhelmshaven. For details see Telegram 0722, 0750, and 1010. 
Convoy "1924" was unsuccessfully bombed from great altitude around mid- 
night off Schiermonnikoog. Steamer SANTOS suffered slight damage. The 
light artillery carrier FORTUNA struck a mine and was damaged off 
Langeoog, and was towed to Wilhelmshaven. There were casualties. With 
this exception, convoy and patrol services proceeded according to plan. 

Ships located between Hook of Holland and Scheveningen were fired upon 
between 0733 and 0744 and forced to withdraw. 

2. Norway : 

Enemy planes dropped aerial torpedoes in the vicinity of the 
Alta battery. Enemy air activity is reported from 22 and 23 Sep. over 
the Arctic coast. Losses of personnel occurred at Kirkenes, but no 
other damage was reported. In the forenoon of 24 Sep. enemy planes 
operated over the west coast. The Air Force suspects that mines were 
laid off Bergen. 

3. Arctic Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reported a number of merchant vessels under 
escort of 3 destroyers and 1 patrol boat on a 200° course off Cape 
Eystrahorn (Iceland) at 1230. The 5th Air Force assumes they are part 
of convoy OJ 14 which is now disbanding. No enemy forces v.ere sighted 
along the route from the North Car»e via Bear Island and the Ice Fjord 
to 77° N, 05° E. 

The British Admiralty announces the arrival on 23 Sep. of a large 
British and American convoy at a northern Russian port. Losses were 
suffered due to strong enemy attacks. However, most ships had reached 
their destinations. No escort vessel was lost. 

This communique doubtless refers to convoy PQ 18. 

Own Situation : 

a. Our submarines were unable to reestablish contact with 
convoy QP 14. A search of the coastal area of northern Iceland was 
futile in spite of good visibility. The operation was terminated . It 
was carried out at first by 10 and in the end by 7 submarines. 

Results : Submarines U "435", U M 703" and U "488" sank 3 destroyers, 
submarine U "435" an auxiliary cruiser and U "435" and U "255" 2 
steamers (totalling 27.600 GRT). Tn addition, 4 steamers were torpedoed 



-28O- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

by submarine IT "435". 

In view of the prevailing conditions this result is 
quite satisfactory. Submarine U "435" (Lt. Strelow) 
must be credited with most of the success. The captain's 
name was unfortunately not mentioned in the communique 
of the Armed Forces High Command, as suggested by the 
Naval Staff. 

b. The Air Force Operations Staff replied to the request of 
the Naval Staff (see War Diary 23 Sep.) concerning the reported success 
in the battle against convoy PQ 18 as follows: 

The announcement that 38 vessels of convoy PQ 18 were sunk did not 
originate at the Air Force Operations Staff, which reported only 23 
ships sunk (through Robinson). The Kurfuerst intermediate command 
(deputy to the Chief, Section Ic ) added 2 probable sinkings to this 
number. The Armed Forces High Command added the 8 vessels reported 
seriously damaged by the Air Force to the number of vessels sunk. The 
Air Force Operations Staff cannot be blamed for this. The matter is 
being investigated as carefully as indicated in the Navy's communica- 
tion. This information tallies perfectly with the data in the posses- 
sion of the Naval Staff. The Air Force Operations Staff is taking 
into account, however, that 5 merchant vessels were reported during 
these days in Byelushya Bay (Novaya Zemlya), which apparently joined 
the convoy north of Kanin Nos # The reports about the strength of the 
convoy are based on visual observation and photos were not taken dur- 
ing these days. This would account for errors concerning the type but 
not the number of vessels, considering overcasts ranging from 80 to 
100$ and ceilings of 100 m. 

Granting that the assumpt ion of the Air Force Operation? 
Staff is correct and ships did join the convoy from 
Byelushya Bay, this nevertheless cannot alter the fact 
that approximately 20 vessels of convoy PQ 18 reached 
Archangel; it could possibly serve to justify to a 
certain extent the sinking figures reported by the Air 
Force. There is no justification for adding the 2 
probable sinkings. 

We must now await the forthcoming explanation of the 
Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command. It is un- 
likely that the ships reported damaged were included in 
the list of sinkings without good cause, which may not 
be readily apparent. 

c. Group North submits the following communication received 
from the 5th Air Force: 

The extremely tight fuel situation in which the 5th Air Force finds 
itself requires that, in addition to the stringent restrictions of air 
transport services, reconnaissance and combat missions, too, must be 
considerably limited. Thus any activity will have to be limited for 
the time being to supporting the Army during decisive offensive or 
critical defensive operations. As far as naval operations are con- 
cerned, reconnaissance must be limited to spot checks of general areas 
or to locally concentrated coverage of areas directly threatened or of 
target areas. 

This most unpleasant new difficulty arising for the cony 
duct of naval warfare is highly regrettable. In addition 

-281- B-105 2 



coitidentia l 

24 Sep. 1942 

to the fact that, as reported by Grouo North or. a pre- 
vious occasion, reconnaissance flights over the southern 
and central North Sea were discontinued a long time ago> 
the most elementary requirements of naval warfare for 
routine reconnaissance will also no longer be met from 
now on either in the northern North Sea or in the Arctic 
Ocean. In view of the constant grave threat of enemy 
attacks on the northern Norwegian, ar??, which is con- 
stantly emohasized by the Fuehrer himself, the Air Force 
is assuming a terrific responsibility in taking this step. 

d. Concerning the commitment of the naval fore eg (see Tar 
Diary 13 Sep.), Group North reoortei on 17 3eo. that the flRPITZ will 
remain at Narvik as ordered. At the same time the Com iral, 

Group North requested "information about the reasons for this order 
and directions or an order referring to the rest of ray forces , so as to 
be able to make my dispositions conform to the olans of the Naval Staff 
which did not reach me and in order to avoid having to cancel oriers 
previously issued by me. I intended to transfer the TIRPITZ now for the 
following reasons: 

(1) Te are not interested in tying ur> British forces in the north 
area while combatting ^P convoys and during subsequent onerations. 

(2) b problem of escorting the TIRFITZ could have been solved 
easily now with 2 torpedo boats available for -the Durpose. 

(3) My long-range plans call for the transfer of TIHPITZ and 
SCHARNHORST to Trondheim, of HIPrZR, ?RINZ EUGEN, SCHEZR, and possibly 

ITZOVf to Narvik, of :rJl?.::3ERG and KCELN to Alta Fjord; the destroyers 
to be divided in the proportion 1:1:3. The purpose is: 

(a) To disperse my forces and avoid concentration. 

(b) To take into account existing shipyard facilities. 

(c) To orovide jump-off places for limited onerations and for defen- 
sive tasks in the event of an enemy invasion.'* 

Group North should have realized that the consent of the 
Naval Staff or if necessary of the Fuehrer through the 
Naval Staff should be obtained first in a matter~of such 
fundamental importance as the strategic distribution of 
the German Navy. 

The Naval Staff replied to Group North on 24 Sep. The reply comprises 
a detailed analysis of the operational possibilities for the forces in 
the north area and concluies with the request to submit his plar.6 once 
more revised in accordance with this analvsis. For cooy of Telegram 
l/Skl I op 1862/42 Gkdos. Chefs, see ^Tar Diary, Part C, Vol. Ha. 



IV. Skagerrak. Baltic Sea Entrances. Baltic Sea 

Enemy air activity during the night of 23 Sen. ranged over the 
Danish area, Schleswig-Holstein, and the western and central Baltic 
Sea as far as Darsser Ort. Bombs were dropped among other places at 
Flenscurg and TiBmar and caused substantial damage. Mines were dropoed 



-282- fr- 10 52 



CONFIDENTIAL 



2k Sep. 19^2 



off Langeland and the Baltic Sea entrances were closed on account of 
suspected ae'rial mines. For details see Telegrams 0720, O7I4.O, 1210, 
and 171I4 • 1 plane crashed near Flensburg, another one was shot down 
ty a patrol boat off Omoe. 

9 acoustic mines were swept in the Baltic Sea entrances by mine-explod- 
ing vessels equipped with special acoustic mine-sweeping gear. 

5 vessels of the 9th Patrol Boat Flotilla took up positions in a 
patrol line off the Swedish coast in order to discourage breakthrough 
attempts. 

Spec la 1 Items ; 

The Baltic Naval Station's request (see War Diary 20 Sep.) caused an 
investigation into the equipment of commands with protective gear 
against acoustic mines; this check revealed that, according to infor- 
mation from the Naval Ordnance Division, Underwater Obstacles Branch, 
the Mining; and Barrage Inspectorate had warned all commands on 20 Sep. 
of the urgency of protection from acoustic mines and had informed them 
of the available equipment. The Baltic Naval Station evidently did not 
take the necessary precautions within its area in time as was done 
by other commands. On 21 Sep. there were only I4. anti-acoustic mine 
gears In the area of the Baltic Naval Station and I4. in that of the 
Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea, whereas the Commanding Ad- 
mirals, Defenses, North and West had 6 and 12 respectively. The re- 
quest of the Ealtic Naval Station was supported by the Naval Staff. 

Eastern Baltic Sea ; 

Group North submits a belated report on the situation of 12 Sep. 
according to which the Finnish steamers HERA (1,379 GRT) and JUSSI H. 
(2,525 GRT) were sunk by a submarine during the night of 11 Sep. In 
the Finngrund area northeast of Gaevle. 



hted 



Nothing to report from the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, 
Baltic Sea: 

Special Items : 

a. The Naval Liaison Staff, Finland reports, following its conferences 
with the Chief of the Finnish General Staff about transfer of the ships 
from Lake Ladoga, that Marshal Mannerheim's past attitude opposing the 
withdrawal of the coastal mine -layers and Italian subchasers was moti- 
vated mainly by his hope for an imminent change of the strategic situa- 
tion on land. Since this hope did not materialize, Gener-al Heinrichs 
believes that the Marshal will no longer oppose the transfer. 

This report was forwarded to the Armed Forces High Command, Operations 
Staff. 

b. With reference to the sinking of motor mine sweeper "11 M off Reval, 
the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea commented extensively on her 
war diary entries of 11 Jun. 19^4-2. Group North submits the war diary 
together with the comment of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea 
and remarks that the letter's notes reveal a chain of misunderstandings 
which eventually ended with the fateful mine explosion. A clarification 




-283- 



8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

of the question of responsibility can be expected solely fror the in- 
vestigation of the circunstances of the sinking or the subsequent 
court martial proceedings. 

In its reply to Group North (with copy to the Commander, Mine Sweepers, 
Baltic Sea) the Naval Staff refers to its previous directive (see <Var 
Diary 12 Aug.) and states that the Group's comment does not deal with 
the question of whether notor mine sweeper "11" wes advised of the 
Russian mine situation according to the information the Group had re- 
ceived. The Naval Staff requests Group North to see that this point 
is clarified during the investigation and the subsequent court martial 
proceedings. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance was particularly lively over the Bar of 
Biscay. Apart from a number of submarine warning signals, a r.essa^e 
reporting an attack by a submarine was intercepted from east of the 
mouth of the Orinoco River. 

2. Own Situation : 

Regarding the termination of operations against convoy QJP 
14 see Own Situation, Arctic Ocean. 

Submarine U "610" sighted 4 steamers on an easterly course in quadrant 
AE 1718 and was ordered to shadow them. 

In the North Atlantic both Group "Blitz" and Group "Vorwaerts" are 
operating against the 2 incoming convoys observed in quadrant AK. 

In the evening a third convoy of 12 steamers and escort vessels, this 
one outbound, was reported in quadrant AK by submarine U "599". The 
boat made a futile attack but was subsequently driven off. The sub- 
marines of Group "Blitz", depending on their positions, thus have the 
possibility of operating against this convoy, tqp. 

3 submarines also attacked 3 single ships in quadrant AK and sank an 
8,000 GRT stear.er and the stear.er ROUMANIE (3,563 GRT). The sinking of 
the third ship is doubtful. 

No reports of successes from the U.S. east coast were received. 

In the West Indies, the British steamer RSI35POOL (4,898 GRT), the Nor- 
wegian steamer LINDVA"jZ:: (2,412 3RT) and a U.S. steamer of 4,500 GRT 
were sunk by submarine U "515", and an 8,000 GRT steamer by submarine 
U "512". 

The submarines of the South Atlantic Group "litis" had nothing to re- 
port . 

Submarine U "501" sank a transport sailing vessel in the !!editerrancan. 

For further news see supplement to submarine situation in V.'ar Diarv, 
Part B, Vol. IV. 



-28%- B_1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

The German Armistice Commission confirms the reported sinking of the | 
Spanish steamer MONTE UORBEA, under way from Buenos Aires to Bilbao via 
Curacao, which took place on 19 Sep. at 14 55 • N, 60° 00 » W. The 
Spanish survivors have reached Martinique. 

The report of submarine U "612" has not arrived as yet. 



VT. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

Daylight reconnaissance and fighter bomber attacks on Sea- 
ford and Hastings, where hits were scored. York and the alternate 
target of Beverley were attacked during the night of 23 Sep. During 
the night of 24 Sep. Truro near Falmouth was raided. 

2. Incursions : 

45 enemy planes laid mines in the Baltic Sea as far as Danzig 
and in the German Bight during the night of 24 Sep. 

3. Mediterranean Theater ; 
Nothing to report. 

4. Eastern Front ; 

Only reconnaissance reports were received from the Black Sea 
and the Arctic Ocean. 



T» 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

The ship situation at Gibraltar has not changed on the whole. 
No further increase of the number of planes was observed. Radio monitor- 
ing at 0530 located only 1 ship east of the Strait. A floating crane 
was tov/ed from Gibraltar in the direction of the Atlantic under escort 
of 2 vessels in the evening of 28 Sep. 

Several submarines were located in the central and eastern Mediterranean, 

Reconnaissance planes spotted what seemed to be a motor gunboat on a 
westerly course at 1710 70 miles northeast of Marsa Matruh and a con- 
voy of 4 steamers with an escort of 2 destroyers and 2 planes on a 
southerly course approximately 85 miles north of Port Said, 

An agent reports that 1 cruiser, 10 destroyers, 6 transports, 5 loaded 
tankers, and 5 submarines left Haifa in a westerly direction on 22 Sep. 

Radio monitoring intercepted a number of air reconnaissance messages 
reporting the sighting of German convoys in the central Mediterranean. 



-285- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

The Italian torpedo boat TIFONE struck a mine off Bari and wa,s 
towed to port. 

Tobruk and Trapani were raided by enemy planes during the night of 22 
Sep. 

The German General attached to Headquarters of the Italian High Commandl 
reports to the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command that as 
previously reported, the Italian Command attributes particular im- 
portance to sealing the passage between Cape Bon and Ras Mustapha. In 
order to be able to close this gap rapidly in an emergency by means of 
a barrage in 2 parts, it is necessary to reduce the width of the passage 
from 3 miles to 1200 meters. The Italian High Command requests the 
Armed Forces High Command to define its opinion on this important matter 
at its earliest convenience. 

The German Naval Command, Italy forwards this report to the N&val Staff 
and remarks that the plans for the alarm minefield are being prepared 
by the Italian Admiralty. The exact location will be reported as soon 
as a decision is made. The German Naval Command Italy suggests com- 
plete sealing of the territorial waters and this has been requested 
from the Italian Admiralty. (See Telegram 1000.) 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Convoy COL DI LAMA was attacked during the evening by an energy 
plane north of Cape Stilo. Details are not yet reported, neither were 
reports received about the outcome of enemy air attacks on the escorted 
tanker R0NDINE. 

Otherwise, supply service and coastal traffic proceeded according to 
plan. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea ; 

Nothing to report* 

31ack Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

According to radio monitoring and air reconnaissance, move- 
ments of warships and merchant vessels were of normal volume only. No 
special information was received. 

Own Situation ; 

Taman Peninsula, Kerch, Balaklava and Sevastopol were attacked 
from the air and suffered minor damage and casualties. The towed barges 
attacked off Cape Takil on 22 Sep. were attacked again on 23 Sep, and 
suffered casualties. 

Mine-sweeping, convoy and transport services proceeded according to plain. 
9,011 tons of goods were unloaded at Yeisk between 4 and 20 Sep. 4 
Slebel ferries and 2 lighters with 1,000 tons of ammunition and pro- 
visions for Yeisk were held up at Mariupol for lack of fuel. 



_286- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
24 Sep. 1942 

VIII. Situation East Asia 

Japanese Headquarters announce that a U.S. NORTHAMPTON -class 
cruiser was damaged by Japanese submarines. 

According to an Exchange Telegraph dispatch, a Japanese division is 
moving in the direction of Chengkiang from Burma. 



LX. Army Situation : 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A ; 

The right wing of the Army Group is mainly engaged in de- 
fensive fighting. Kotlyarevski at the Terek sector was captured. Stropg 
enemy forces are holding out between the Terek and Baksan Rivers. 

Army Group B : 

In the fighting in Stalingrad a few more blocks of the 
northern section of the city were captured. South of Kotluban the 
enemy succeeded in advancing to our supply route 5 km north of 
Rassoshka. At the northern sector of the Army Group we are on the de- 
fensive. 

Central Army Group ; 

An enemy strongpoint at Novosil was captured. Northeast and 
southeast of Rzhev the enemy penetrated temporarily into our lines, In 
the Demidov area our forces captured a number of villages and our 
offensive gained some ground in a northeasterly direction. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Enemy attacks were repulsed at Kholm, Lubnitsa, at the land 
bridge to the II Army Corps, and north of Novgorod. A bitter seesaw 
battle is in progress southeast of Schluesselburg. Our forces began a 
new offensive in the direction of Gaitolovo. 

2. Finnish Front : 

Enemy attempts to cross the Svir River were frustrated. 2 
enemy attacks at the White Sea Canal north of Povyenets were repulsed. 

At the Kandalaksha sector the enemy was beaten and withdrew in a 
southeasterly direction. 

3. North Africa : 

Normal scouting and artillery activity on both sides. 

General of the Panzer Forces Stumme has taken over temporary command 
of the German-Italian Panzer Army from Field Marshal Rommel who is on 
leave for reasons of health. 

4HMHKKHHHKHHHHHKKHHKHKHM** 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain : 

In connection with the numerous accounts describing the resentment ' 
of the Russian people over tne failure to establish the second front, 
the Daily Telegraph points to the tremendous demands made on Great 
Britain's and America's resources from every part of the world, whicn 
cannot be fulfilled because of the lack of transport facilities. 
The need for merchant tonnage has become increasingly urgent luring 
the summer. 

The Food Minister declared in an address that drastic reluct ions in 
food rations are unavoidable during the next 12 raontns. Tne present 
living standard can no longer be maintained. 

Central Africa ; 

The Times reports that Brazzaville and Leopoldville hfve recently 
been garrisoned by U.S. forces. Leopoldville has gained particular 
importance as a depot for tin and rubber and h36 taken the place of 
Malaya and the Dutch East Indies in this respect. Brazzaville is 
the political center of De Gaullist Africa. Both towns are equally 
distant from Dakar, Tunis and Alexandria, a fact emphasized by the 
Times in connection with the efforts to construct trans-African nign- 
ways. 

France : 

In commemoration of the anniversary of Dakar's successful resistance 
in September 1940, the Governor General of lest Africa stated that 
there is general unanimity that French lest Africa must be defended 
against the greedy attacks to which the country is exposed. He 
termed West Africa the vanguard of the North African bloc. Marshal 
Petain can count on Test Africa under all circumstances. 

Finland : 

On 24 Sep. the Government officially denied all rumors spreal since 
20 Sep. about the alleged desire for a separate peace witn Russia 
and termed them false and without foundation. See Political Review 
No. 225, paragrapn 5 for the complete text of tne denial. 



Conference on the Situation with the Chief. Naval Staff 

No reports of importance were made nor any decisions taken. 

As reported from headquarters, the Chief of the Army General Staff, 
General Haider, resigned and was replaced by General Zeitzler. 



Special Items 

I. A report is made on further interrogation of the radio operator 
of the captured motor gunboat "335" at the Wilhelmsnaven Intelligence 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

Center and information about the operation of the direction finding 
gear. The Chief, Communications Division, Naval 9taff reports on 
the evaluation of this information in War Diary, Part C, Vol. lib. 

II. A special announcement issued for publication by Japanese Head- 
quarters reveals that Japanese naval forces have begun operations in 
the Atlantic in close cooperation with the Axis Powers. A Japanese 
submarine is said to have called at a German naval base. The announce- 
ment emphasizes that Japanese operations in the Atlantic are a counter- 
part of German naval operations in the Indian Ocean and have great 
significance. 

A corresponding announcement was issued simultaneously by the Armed 
Forces High Command. 

The publication took place by speoial Japanese request. The Japanese 
evidently feel the need of stressing their collaboration in the 
European and American theaters of war in order to match German 
activity in the Indian and Pacific Cceans. 

The text of the announcement was prepared in consultation between 
the Executive Office of the Commander in Chief, Navy and the Japanese 
Naval Attache. 

III. The Transocean News Agency reports from Ankara about the dis- 
position of forces in the Near East: Numerous indications point to 
the fact that British forces in the Near East are being concentrated 
more and more on the Egyptian front; the positions relinquished by 
the British in Syria, Palestine, Iraq and Iran are occupied by 
auxiliary contingents and newly arriving U.S. forces. Command posts 
of the U.S. Air Force are said to have already been established at 
Beirut, Lydda and at the large Habbania airfield west of Bagdad. A 
large number of Polish units, released from Russian captivity and 
reorganized by British offioers, are garrisoned in Palestine. Apart 
from Australian forces, Greek troops and De Gaullist units are said 
to be in Syria. The number of U.S. troops in Iraq is estimated to 
exceed that of the remaining British forces. U.S. contingents seem 
to be in the majority in Iran, too, although reports that U.S. forced 
have taken over the northern Iranian zone occupied thus far by 
Russia could not be confirmed. The U.S. have a liaison staff in 
Tabriz because U.S. planes are delivered there to Russia. The best 
units of the Soviet occupation forces in Iran have been transferred 
to the Caucasian front and have been replaced, according to Turkish 
reports, by units composed of women. This seems to have been the 
decisive factor in the revival of revolts in northern Iran. 



Situation 25 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Both the French and the British official communiques 
report the capture of Madagascar's capital city Tananarive by 
British forces on 23 Sep. 

According to Reuter, U.S. Secretary of War Stimson announced on 

24 Sep. that the new Alaska highway will be opened for traffic on 
_q nnn. 1EH2 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
86 Sep. 1942 

Otherwise nothing to report* 

2. Own Sltuatloni 

The mmnJ io direotod by Radiogram 2347 to pass 300 
to 350 milee eaat of 8t. Paul* a Rook and to prooeed to ooint " Takel^ger. 

Enemy situation report by Radiogram 1436* 



^I. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation ,: 

According to an intolligtnoe report, the battleships HOWX 
and ANSON are to be commitaioned in the Firth of Forth on 26 Sep. 

The idle tonnage available at southern and western ports is decreas- 
ing, while the number of ferry ships to be used in landing operation^ 
following the capture of a harbor is on the increase. 8 or 9 of 
these craft allegedly left port for the Dieppe raid, but were not 
used. 

3. Own Situation : 

Atlantlo Coast : 

The Loire River estuary was reopened to traffic. 6 ground 
■lnes were sweot off the Olrondo. 

Channel Coast : 

Nothing to report* 

8peclal Itama : 

The Naval Reproaontatlve on the Operations Staff/ Armed 
Foroes High Command report! that the Fuehrer has reoeived an aooount 
on the distribution of food, tobacco, etc. captured at Dieppe, whioh 
is bound to refleot badly on the Savy. 

The Naval Staff orders Group West to report on the matter im- 
nedlately. The immediate reply submitted by the Commanding Admiral, 
Group West is contained in Telegram l/Skl 33307/43 geh. For oopy 
see War Diary, file "Enemy Landing at Dieppe, 19 Sep. 1942". 

The report was transmitted literally to the Naval Representative on 
the Operations Staff, Armed Foroes High Command, who stated in 
reply to questioning that the Futhror had received the first report 
from the Minister of Armament and War Production. Thus court 
martial proceedings, which the Commanding Admiral, Group West sug- 
gested because of the scandalous distortion of the truth in in- 
forming the Fuehrer oan not bo undertaken. 

The Commander in Chief, Nary will avail himself of the next op- 
portunity to discuse thla matter with the Fuehrer. 



S-10S2 



> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

III. North Sea. Norway. Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

Between 2220 and 0020 during the night of 24 Sep. enemy 
mine-laying planes were busy over the German Bight. Mines are 
suspected at the East Frisian Islands, off the Elbe River mouth 
and west of Sylt. 

Mine sweeping was handicapped by bad weather. 

2. Norway : 

Enemy Situation : 

Intelligence reports assert that American, Canadian, 
Norwegian, and British troops have been concentrated on the 
Orkney Islands for a raid on northern Norway scheduled for 
October. Originally, the action was planned for September. 10 
divisions are said to be standing by. 

An agent reported on 24 Sep. that 5 major warships were sighted 
that day off Honningsvaag. 

Own Situation : 

Enemy air activity was reported on 23 and 24 Sep. over 
the Arctic coast, on 24 and 25 Sep. over the west coast (Stavanger), 
and on 25 Sep. over 06lo. Damage was confined to Oslo. 

Convoy service proceeded according to plan. 

An investigation by the Commanding Admiral, Norway, made by order 
of the Naval Staff in compliance with a suggestion of the Reich 
Commissioner of Maritime Shipping, resulted in the reoeal of the 
limitation imposed on shipping between Kirkenes and Petsamo. 
However, larger ships should be sent only in the most urgent 
cases and under favorable weather conditions only, in view of the 
threat from gunfire and on account of the difficulties of naviga- 
tion in the approach to Petsamo Fjord. 

Information to this effect by Telegram 1210. 

3. Arctio Ocean : 

Enemy Situation : 

According to intelligence from Sweden dated 24 Sep. and 
based on observations of a reliable agent, a large northbound 
convoy from Canada to Russia was at 59° 58' N, 44° 15' W on 
22 Sep. 1942. 

This looks like the beginning of convoy operation 
P4 19. 



B-1052 
-2^1- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



25 Sep. 1942 



It iB reported that efforts of the Allies to increase the shipment 
of war material to Russia may be expected in the immediate future. 

According to radio monitoring, 6 or 7 British 6hips were in the 
Archangel area on 25 Sep. A Russian pilot vessel is missing in 
the Kanin Nos area. 

No tactical information was gained from air reconnaissance in the 
Arctic Ocean. 

Own Situation : 

The HIPPER and destroyers Z "13", Z "29", Z "30" and 
Z H 28" of the 8th destroyer Flotilla sailed as planned at 2100 
of 24 Sep. for operation "Zarin". 

Nothing else to report. 

Special Items : 

As previously reported, submarine T J "334" wa6 strafed 
and bombed by a Ju 88 while operating against convoy P^ 17 in 
quadrant A3 ?953. An investigation conducted by the 5th Air 
Force shed no light on the incident. The Naval Staff is firmly 
convinced that the attacking plane was a German Ju 88, but is not 
going to follow up the matter in view of an agreement to this 
effect between the Commanding Admiral, Group North and the Com- 
mander, 5th Air Force. 

For copy of l/Skl I Nord 23512/42 Gkdos., ^hich was forwarded to 
Group North and the Admiral, Arctic Ocean, see War Diary, file 



n 



Rce8s el sprung" . 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances. Baltic Sea 

During the night of 24 Sep. aoproxiraately 30 British planes 
flew over the Danish area and laid mines as far as Danzig Bay. 

An acoustic mine was swapt south of Kela off Gjedser, another 
one off Malmoe, and 4 in the Little Belt. 

e patrol line off the Swedish coast is occupied by 3 patrol 
boats. Convoy service in the area of the Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, Baltic Sea proceeded according to plan. 

Bad weather prevented mine-sweeping in the eastern Baltic Sea. 
Submarine chase and convoy service according to plan. 



V. "erchant Shipping 

The Reich Commissioner of Maritime Shipping doubts whether 
it is feasible to place construction contracts with Spanish 

s and whether it is possible to acquire Spanish tonnage 
for Germany as suggested by the Naval Staff. (See ""Tar Diary 
24 Aug.) All Spanish slipways are occupied and furthermore 



-292- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

Spanish laws prohibit the construction of ships for foreign 
accounts in Spanish shipyards and the sale of Spanish tonnage to 
foreigners. As indicated by the Reich Commissioner of Maritime 
Shipping, every chance to obtain additional Spanish shipping space 
by surreptitious means is utilized to the utmost. These negotia- 
tions, which are rather difficult, are made mostly for the Navy, 
and are in the hands of the Deputy for the Four Year's Plan. 
Repairs on German ships or ships chartered by Germany are con- 
stantly being done at Spanish yards. 

Acoording to a communication of the Shipping and Transport Branch, 
Naval Staff Quartermaster Division, the Navy owns the following 
ships now in Spain: 

1. 10 ships totalling 4,375 GRT of the shipping firm Com- 
mercial Uaritima de Transportes, which belongs entirely to the 
German Navy. 

2. Bought by acquiring the entire capital stook, but not 
yet in operation are: 

a. Approximately 6 steamers of the Compagnia Naviera 
Bachi with a total loading capacity of 5,176 to 6,090 tons. (5 of 
them in the Mediterranean, 1 on the northern Spanish coast.) 

b. 4 trawlers of the Sociedad Pesquera Vizcainan in 
northern Spain. 

3. Under construction for the Navy: 

- a. 20 wooden auxiliary sailing vessels at Valencia. 

b. 2 transport steamers of 300 tons loading capacity 
each, at Barcelona. 

c. 4 motor ships of the same size at Valencia, for 2 
of which suitable motors have to be provided. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

The escort vessel ROCKROSE (800 GRT) was torpedoed at 
1621, 225 miles southeast of Reykjanes, according to radio 
monitoring. 

From the Gulf of St. Lawrence we intercepted 3 submarine sighting 
reports and a report about an attack on a submarine following 
which oil slicks were observed. Other submarine sighting reports 
originated off the Newfoundland coast and off Cape Hatteras. A 
ship east of Trinidad reported a submarine attack. 

2. Own Situation : 

Nothing to report from the Norwegian submarine group. 



-293- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

In the North Atlantic contact with the first incoming convoy 
intercepted by submarine U "258" could not be reestablished. 17 
boats are operating against the second incoming convoy. The enemy 
was spotted once more at 1200 and attacked by 10 submarines in the 
course of the afternoon. The convoy in question is probably an 
"AT" convoy and consists of an unusually great number of trans- 
ports (fast convoy from America to the British Isles). Submarine 
U "96" reported sinking a 10,000 GRT steamer, submarine U "216" 
3 hits on a large 2-funnel steamer of at least 10,000 GRT, but 
probably more. Hydrophone observation established that she 
probably sank. 6 submarines attacked unsuccessfully. 

The outgoing convoy observed on 24 Sep. in quadrant AK 55 by sub- 
marine U "599" was not seen again. Submarine U "432" sank steamer 
PENNMAR (5,000 GRT) in quadrant AK 2721. 

The convoy of 4 steamers reported by submarine U "610" at the 
northern entrance of Denmark Strait turned out to be a group of 
fishing steamers. The submarines U "610", U "620", and U "253" 
were ordered to proceed to quadrant AK 30 in the Atlantic. 

No successes were reported from the American coast. 

From the "Test Indies it is reported by submarine U "517" that the 
8,000 GRT steamer sunk in quadrant EO 1419 had already been 
damaged by torpedo hits and was accompanied by 2 vessels. Sub- 
marine U "512" is ordered to reoort the circumstances under which 
steamer MONTE GORBEA was sunk. 

The boats of the South Atlantic and Mediterranean groups had 
nothing to report. 

Special Item : 

See 1/Skl I U 1871/42 Gkdos. Chefs, in War Diary, Part C, Vol. IV 
for copy of the report of the Commanding Admiral, Submarines on 
his plans for operations of type XD2 submarines at the southeast 
African coast, copy of the plan of the Italian Commander, Mine 
Sweepers, Bordeaux to commit submarine AMMIRAGLIO CAGNI in ap- 
proximately the same area and finally the copy of the approval 
of these plans by the Naval Staff. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 

The day passed without any major event. During the 
night of 25 Sep. our forces attacked Penzance with observed good 
results. 

2. Incursions ; 

Several daylight flights into the Oslo area were ap- 
parently aimed at a meeting of the National Samling (Quisling's 
party, Tr. N. ) held at the square in front of the royal castle, 
but failed to interfere with it. For other damage inflicted see 
daily situation report. During the night mines were laid in 
Dutch and Danish waters and in the German Bight. 



-29*- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

U.S. fighter planes made their first appearance over 
Malta. Successful missions were flovm by our air forces at the 
Egyptian front. Otherwise reconnaissance activity. 

4. Eastern Front : 

30 enemy planes were shot down on 24 Sep. and 27 planes 
on 25 Sep. at the various army sectors. 

Nothing else to report. 



VIII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black 3ea 

1. Enemy Situation. Mediterranean : 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, Gibraltar 
was attacked on the evening of 24 Sep. by two single planes. Damage 
has not been ascertained. The number of ships in the harbor is 
slightly higher than on the day before. Apart from the ships 
regularly lying at Valletta 7 submarines were observed there. 
The tonnage at Alexandria had increased by approximately 10,000 GRT 
as compared to 20 Sep. Besides, there were 37 small craft, ap- 
parently landing barges. 

Photo reconnaissance of Suez revealed that merchant tonnage has 
increased by 28,000 GRT since 23 Sep. 

In the forenoon 4 transports and 2 destroyers or escort vessels 
and a group of 3 warships were sootted approaching Alexandria. 

Radio monitoring intercepted reports of British reconnaissance 
planes in the central Mediterranean. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

An enemy PT boat headed toward the coast of Tobruk was 
scared off by Italian warning shots during the night of 23 Sep. 

a coast guard station on Linosa Island was fired upon by an enemy 
submarine on the evening of 25 Sep. The Italian subchaser CYPROS 
sank on the forenoon of 24 Sep. off Zante for unknown cause fol- 
lowing an explosion. The Italian steamer FIUME (386 GRT) was 
sunk on the same day off Rhodes by an enemy submarine. 

In connection with the report of the German General attached to 
Headquarters of the Italian Armed Forces High Command (see War 
Diary 24 Sep.) the Naval Staff submits a plan of how best to 
solve the problem of sealing the French territorial waters off 
Cape Bon to the Naval Representative on the Operations Staff, 
Armed Forces High Command, with copy to the German Naval Command, 
Italy. 

For copy of Telegram l/Skl Ira 1902/42 Gkdos. Chefs, see Tar 
Diary, Part C, Vol. XIII. 



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CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Steamer PAL01IBA did not reach Tripoli since 6he was surk 
on 23 Sep. off Cape Curiat by an enemy submarine. An auxiliary 
sailing vessel engaged in coastal shipping ran ashore on 23 Sep. 
at LJarsa el Gazella. 

Nothing else to report. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea ; 

3 Swedish supply ships sailed from Piraeu6 on 24 Sep. 
Convoy service proceeded according to plan. 

The Commanding Admiral, Aegean Sea reports for the period from 
15 Jun. to 14 Jul. that there were 39 convoys in the Aegean Sea, 
escorted by destroyers, torpedo boats, and other ships, and 3 
convoys to and from North Africa, all 3 escorted by destroyers, 
and torpoio boats, and 2 by subchasers as well. 

During the period from 15 Aug. to 14 Seo. the number of convoys 
within the Aegean Sea increased to 60, requiring 23 destroyer and 
24 torpedo boat escort missions, etc., while the number of North 
African convoys rose to 34 requiring 15 destroyer and 35 torpedo 
boat escort missions. To the above figures must be adied traffic 
by means of Spanish steamers and auxiliary sailing vessels which 
operated without escorts. 

The above figures illustrate among other things 
the weakness of our escort service particularly 
in the North Africa traffic. 

Black Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

According to radio monitoring, battleship PARIZHSKAYA 
KOLiUNA was proceeding 130 miles west of Ochemchiri in the evening 
of 24 Sep. A submarine was sighted east of Yalta during the 
night of 23 Sep. .Reconnaissance revealed nothing unusual about 
convoy traffic along the Caucasian coast. 

Own Situation ; 

An Italian subchaser operated during the night of 24 Sep, 
against the submarine sighted east of Yalta. 

During the same night PT boats S "26" and S "49" operated off 
Gelendzhik and sank 2 steamers of 1,500 and 2,000 GRT anchored 
off Cape Idukopas. No convoys were sighted. 

Mine-sweeping activities off Sevastopol, in the Kerch Strait and 
off Varna proceeded according to plan. A lighter sank on 24 Sep. 
in Beresinki Canal due to an influence mine. 

Enemy air activity increased on 24 Sep. 2 naval barges and com- 
munication and harbor installations at Kerch were damaged. Aerial 
mines are suspected to have been laid southeast of Feodosiya. 



-296- s - 1052 



> 



CONFIDENTIAL 
35 Sep. 1942 

Convoy service on schedule. The Group decided to operate the 
steamers KASSA, KOLOZSVAR, BUDAPEST and VOLGO-DON in the Sea of 
Azov exclusively. 

Special Items ; 

The Naval Liaison Officer to the Army General Staff informs the 
Naval Staff Operations Division and the Naval Staff Quartermaster 
Division of his concern about the effects of enemy mine-laying 
operations upon our future supply traffic off the Caucasian coast 
and of the order given to Naval Group South to investigate whether 
it is possible to procure the urgently needed reinforcement . of 
modern mine-sweeping equipment (approximately 3 motor mine sweeper 
flotillas) from Germany. (See Telegram 1900.) 

The Naval Staff Operations Division and the Naval Quartermaster 
Division also receive copies of the questionnaire teletyped to 
Group South by the Naval Liaison Officer to .the Army General Staff, 
concerning past and expected future transport performance, which 
show that in the Naval Liaison Officer's ooinion the supply ship- 
ments in the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov are by no means suf- 
ficient to meet the operational requirements of the Army. (See 
Telegram 1901.) 

The Chief, Operations Division, Naval Staff thereupon telephoned 
the Naval Liaison Officer to the Army General Staff and pointed 
out that his method of gathering information could not be ap- 
proved; the Naval Liaison Officer asserted that he had merely 
intended to pick up all pertinent data in order to be prepared 
for the expected protests on the part of the newly appointed Chief 
of the Army General Staff. He was then told that the Navy did 
everything within its power to meet the demands of the other 
service branches with regard to supply and transport, and was in- 
structed to get in touch with the Admiral, Black Sea, so that he 
would be able to present the measures taken by the Navy to the 
Army General Staff in a correct light. 



IX. Situation East Asia 

The U.S. Navy Department announced the loss of destroyer 
JARVIS off Guadalcanal and of U.S. auxiliary transport LITTLE 
(World War I destroyer) in the Solomon Islands. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front ; 

Army Group A ; 

The operations at the western sectors of the Army Group 
are characterized by extraordinarily stubborn enemy resistance 
encountered particularly in the Shapsupskaya area. In the first 



"297- B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
25 Sep. 1942 

stage of our offensive toward Tuapse the 101st Light Infantry 
vision broke through heavily fortified enemy positions after 
bitter fighting and reached the area west-southwest of the 
Khadizhenskaya railway station. 

At the easterr. wing the 23rd Panzer Division established a bridge- 
bead across the Baksan River south of Novo Poltavskoye after over- 
coming similar stubborn enemy resistance. The village itself was 
attacked from the south and southeast by a flanking maneuver of 
the 13th Panzer Division. Illarinovka was captured. The 111th 
Infantry Division repulsed an enemy counterattack. 

Army Group S ; 

In the northern section of Stalingrad we captured the 
block of Communist Party buildings. Enemy pressure at Yersovka 
and Kotluban continued. The gain achieved by our counterattack 
at the Voronezh penetration point could not be held. An enemy 
batallion established itself at both banks of the Veduga River 
mouth on the west bank of the Don River. An enemy penetration 
occurred also north of Korsun and led to a counterattack on our 
part. 

Central Army Group : 

Enemy attacks north of the Vyazma-Kaluga railroad were 
repulsed in hand to hand fighting. The enemy did not resume his 
attacks in the Rzhev area. The penetration north of Byela was 
cleaned up in bitter close-range fighting and ground was gained 
in the Demidov area. One of our divisions attacked from the 
newly won position and fought its way to a few villages and 
hilltops which were captured. Also at Velizh we oocupied 2 
villages. 

Northern Army Group : 

Renewed enemy attacks on the northern flank of the land 
triage to the II Army Corps were repulsed. Continuing the attack 
tr.e two assault groups succeeded in making contact with each 
other at Gaitolcvo. The southern wedge is still being enlarged. 
Our attack on the Chernaya River sector is making progress. 

2. Finnish Front : 

It became evident that the enemy is concentrating on 
the Svirstroi electric power plant sector of the Svir River front. 
This is true to a lesser degree at the Maselskaya sector. 

3. North Africa : 

Artillery fire has become heavier. 



-298- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



wing groups have started another 
a second European front and 
which would menace England If 
with unchecked fury following 
For details see Political 



26 Sep. I9I42 

Items of Political Importanc e 

Great Britain and U.S.A. : 

Radical British and American left 

campaign for the establishment of 

point in particular to the threat 

the Germans were to turn westward 

a collapse of Russian resistance. 

Review No. 226, paragraph 1. It had to he expected that heavy 

pressure would he exerted on VYillkie during his visit to Russia 

so that he would continue his trip advocating the immediate 

opening of a second front; this Is borne out by the news coming 

from Moscow, 

U.S.A. ; 

United Press reports an announcement issued by the Maritime 
Commission according to which the 6,000,000 GRT construction goal 
for 19l|2 will probably be reached and the goal of 15,000,000 to 
16,000,000 GRT for the coming year will likewise be reached, 
provided the necessary raw materials are available. ' 

It is hard to believe that an official agency would 
release propaganda of this type with such qualif- 
ications. 

United Press also reports 1iiat the Undersecretary of the Navy 
in an address to a shipyard workers' convention warned of the 
danger of over-optimism and complacency in no uncertain terms 
and stated that the U.S.A. will lose the war if America does 
not wholeheartedly concentrate on the war effort. 

Chile : 

President RIos declared In a press conference that no agreements 
whatsoever had been signed during his visit to the U.S.A. 

Turkey : 

According to a Times report, the contracts for the purchase of 
Turkish products by Great Britain have been signed.' Moreover, 
negotiations are under way for British purchases of Turkish 
chromium ore. 



Situation 26 Sep. I9I+2 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Sltuatl on : 

According to dead reckoning, the DRESDEN will overtake 
the KULMERIAND in the South Atlantic between the i^th and 5th 
reference points after point "Rose". 



-299- 



B-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 

26 -.- . - .2 

Bot : erefore instructed by Radiogram 1225 th t the 

Is to stay 100 miles eart and the "J to stay 100 

les .vest of the main coarse. Moreover, the I LAND is to 

reduce her 3peed for 2 days between point "Kurbelwelle" and the 
latitude of point B Sae .9 " so that the ships will pass one another 
in the central South Atlantic. 

As reported by the KUL the ship is expected to pass point 

"Kurzgeleit" on 2 Oct. A check of this report at the Naval Staff 
by dead reckoning shows that the progress at cruising speed is 
calculated on a very conservative basis ^nd that weather conditions 
were t account. 

The Naval Staff in. to this effect and counts 

on the ship's passing the above mentioned point between 2& and 
JO Sep, She is then to proceed via points "Kurbelwelle" and 
"Kulaination". (See Radiogram 1736.) 

The ftESERIAND is ordered by Telegram 19U& to proceed according to 
r sailing instructions after passing point "v.elle". 

Ship "I4.5" reported on 25 Sep. being ready for operations, except 
for the autogyro observation kite which will be delivered on 28 Sep, 



II . Situation West Area 

1. Zr.emy Situation ; 

Radio monitoring intercepted messages beginning 2019 
involving the rescue of British flyers approximately 52 miles 
west-southwest of Guernsey, in which the CLEVELAND, J destroyers, 
torpedo bort KRAKO'.VIAK, and 6 motor launches took part under 
protection of 3 Hudsons. Altogether, 7 shins, 2 subchasers, 1 
patrol vessel, 8 motor launches, 15 escort vessels, and L vessels 
of undetermined classification were located at sea. 

2. Own Situation ; 

Atlantic Coast ; 

Group 'Jest orders the blockade-runner bRAKE to sail 
on 27 Sep. 

Channel Coast ; 

Mine-laying operations of the 2nd, i+th, and 6th PT Eoat 
Flotillas are scheduled for the evening. 

Ships of the 56th and J>bth Mine Sweeper Flotillas were bombed and 
strafed by enemy planes between Calais and Blanc Nez in the 
early morning hours of 26 Sep. and suffered minor damage. 



-300- B - 1052 



CONFID E NTIAL 
26 Sep. 19l|2 

III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

A Danish wooden trawler sank off Llavandshuk due to a 
mine, probably an acoustic mine. At 0020 the mine-exploding vessel 
"II4.5 was unsuccessfully attached by bomber3. Several air attacks 
were msde during the night of 19 Sep. on mine-exploding vessel "IT"; 
all of the 10 bombs dropped missed the target. 7 ground mines 
were swept off Scheveningen and off Schiermonnikoog. 

2. Norway and Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

The British Admiralty issued a detailed account on the 
convoys PQ 18 and ^P IJ4. . A copy of it is contained in supplement 
to Foreign Press Report No. 22~G of the Naval Staff Intelligence 
Division. It reveals for the first time the enemy assumption that 
German planes dropped mines on 12 Sep. in the path of the convoy. 
Destroyer SOMALI, from the escort of QP II4., was torpedoed and taken 
in tow, but sank 3 days later. Also the motor ship LEDA was sunk. 
2 German submarines were definitely sunk and I4. more probably damaged. 
[j.0 German planes crashed. Only vague statements are made about 
the number of convoy ships lost. 

This report is highly disputable. It. describes 
among other things air attacks supposed to have 
taken place on a day when the German Air Force 
had no contact with the enemy at all» 

Own Situation ; 

On 2I4. and 25 Sep. a Russian battery on Rybachi Peninsula 
fired upon an incoming motor mine sweeper group and also on Paitna 
and Nurmansaetti without result. The fire was returned. 

The submar ine alarm reported by destroyer Z "27" off Langneset in 
Alta Fjord was probably an attack with aerial torpedoes, according 
to subsequent investigation. 

5 guns of the Eltevik battery are ready for action.. 

Enemy air activity during the night of 25 Sep. in the Oslo area; 
no bombs were dropped. 

The forces engaged in operation "Zarln" have not yet reported. 



I V. Skagerrak, Ba lt ic Sea Entrances, Baltic Se a 

2 ground mines were swept on 25 and 2 on 26 Sep. in the Little 
Belt by the experimental vessel KEISTERNEST with large noise boxes. 
Cutter IIIj equipped with towed coil gear sank in the Sound probably 
due to an acoustic mine. On 2I4. Sep. the Finnish steamer NAVIGATOR 
struck a mine off Trelleborg and a small Dutch steamer another 
mine south of Falsterbo canal; both of them sank. 

In the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic Sea an enemy 



-301- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



2 Sep. 1%.2 



.arine w&s pursued a^tcr being sighted off Steinort. 
convoying was ordered for troop transports, leave steamers, 
ships, tinkers and similar important war transports sailing 
Bothnian Gulf ports by way of Abo. 



Compulsory 
hospittl 
for 



V. Submarine '..arfare 

1 • Enemy Situ at lop : 

Very lively reconnaissance activity in the southern 
rendezvous area. A total of ^5 planes were observed, including 
10 fighter planes which made low-level attacks en patrol vessels 
off Brest* 

An unidentified steamer reported a submarine 220 miles, northwest 
of Madeira. The steamer reported torpedoed on 25 Sep. 225 Eiles 
southeast of Reykjanes ves not the RCCKRCSE but some unidentified 
ship. 

Own S'-tuati on : 

5 submarines recently left for the zone of operations. 

In the "orth Atlantic, the operation against the incoming convoy 
was continued by Croup "Llitz"; submarine U "91" torpedoed a 
5, CCO G?.T steaner in quadrant AL I4I1.Q9 and submarine U "liOLj." sank 
a destroyer in quadrant AL 5U73 • The 2-funnel steamer sunk on 
£5 Sep. by submarine U "96" answered the description of the 
RZI> T A DEL PACIFICO (17,700 CRT). 

At I4OO submarine U "617" encountered a 30uthwestbound convoy of 
more than 20 steamers in quadrant AE 63S2 and torpedoed 2 ships 
of 5,000 and ;,000 GET. She was subsequently driven off. The 12 
submarines operating in this area plus 6 approaching ones are 
joined into a new group "Tiger" and are instructed to operate 
against this convoy, since operations against the incoming cenvoy 
had to be called off. 

Another success in this part of the North Atlantic is the reverted 
sinking of a FLORIDA- type steamer (10,000 GET) by submarine U "6l c ", 

Submarine U "i+1+2" sank an unidentified ship telonging to a cenvoy 
of 3 steamers In quadrant AE 6519. 

From the U.S. east coast situation reports only have been received 
saying nothing about any achievements. 

This applies also to the west Indies and the South Atlantic group 
"litis". 

For additional news see supplement to submarine situation in V*ar 
Diary, Part E, Vol. IV. 

Referring to the sinking of the Spanish motor ship MONTE GORBEA, 
submarine U "512" reports seeing the neutrality markings, but con- 
sidered them a camouflage, because the ship was steering a zigza£ 
course and did not match the description furnished by the Groener 



U' 



I 



B-105 2 



-502- 



26 Sep. 19J+2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



manual. (See Radiogram 2225*) For detailed report see V/ar Diary, 
Fart C, Vol. VIII. 



Special Items : 

On 3 Sep. the Commanding Admiral, Subrrarines submitted 
the interference by enemy planes with submarine warfare 
practical experience, he pointed out that, in view of t 
aeronautical developments, the time is not far off when 
situation with regard to combatting convoys will become 
in almost every part of the No-.'th Atlantic. The Comman 
Submarines is therefore renewing his urgent pleas that 
combat the enemy escort air forces; since the prerequis 
this task are not completely met by the He 177' s whose 
action does not exceed 2200 km, he requests that the de 
emphasized for an efficient long-range combat plane to 
future offensive submarine warfare. 



a report on 

; citing 

he recent 
the aerial 
intolerable 

ding Admiral,; 

our Air Force 

ites for 

range of 

mand be 

serve for 



The Naval Staff agrees in full with these arguments regarding the 
necessity of adequate countermeasur es and considers the elimination 
of enemy escort planes as one of the essentials for successful 
submarine operations. The demand of the Commanding Admiral, Sub- 
marines to provide efficient combat planes, superior to the He 177* 
was submitted to the Air Minister and Commander In Chief, Air Force 4 
although the development of a new plane type will take considerable | 
time in view of the well-known tight situation of the aviation 
industry. (The request was submitted on 26 Sep. under l/Skl 
23966 A2 Gkdos.) 

However, in the Naval Staff's opinion, to throw our own air forces 
into the battle against enemy aircraft has its disadvantages, too; 
as long as there is no rapid, simple, and reliable identification 
signal device which permits certain identification of friend and 
foe, submarines will always be forced to submerge immediately 
upon the approach of any plane. Thus contact with the target is 
lost and later operations jeopardized. Furthermore, the range 
of enemy air forces will always exceed that of our planes in view 
of the existing geographical conditions. Finally, it has to be 
taken Into account that the enemy will always be in a position to 
make use of his aircraft carriers. For all these reasons the 1 

Naval Staff sees an urgent need to improve the anti-aircraft weapons 
and identification signals of our submarines, apart from the 
development of efficient combat planes. The Naval Staff instructed 
the Naval Staff, Submarine Division to push the solution of these 
problems more energetically. 

Directives to this effect were I?3ued to the Commanding Admiral, 
Submarines and the Submarine Division of the Naval Staff. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 
Nothing to re~ort» 

2. Incursions ; 

31 enemy incursions were reported in the evening, 2R of 
Tenet ranted Into western~-and 1 into eastern" 



-JO?- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
2b Sep. 1^1+2 

In the west, mines were laid in the German Eight and in Danish 
waters; the planes flew as far as Yorsaw and Kadom in the east. 
No bombs were dropped and 1 enemy plane was shot down. 

3. "edlterranean Theater ; 

10 enemy planes were reported shot down over Egypt. Cufra, 
oasis was attacked with good resvlts. Otherwise there was only 
reconnaissance activity. 

I4.. Eastern Front : 

A large tug and one transpor t were damaged by bombs 
during raids on Tuapse and Sochi on 25 Sep. 

The Caucasian coast and the Caspian Sea were reconnoi tered. For 
details see daily situation report. 

Special Item ; 

The comments of Naval Group North on the cooperation between Navy 
and Air Force (night fighters and anti-aircraft) addressed to the 
Air Force Group Commander, Central Area is submitted to the 
Operations Division, Naval Staff for its information. For copy 
see Telegram IC56. The Group objects to too great restrictions on 
the freedom of naval anti-aircraft batteries and warships to 
open fire. 



VII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

According to an intelligence report from Spain, a convoy 
of 8 shirs and 3 escort vessels was sighted on an easterly course 
off Cape Spartel. According to an Italian report 8 more steamers 
are at Gibraltar than on 25 Sep. Radio monitoring from the Gibraltar 
area leads the German Naval Command Italy to believe that preparations 
for an operation directed toward the central Mediterranean might 
have been in progress for the past 2 days. Italian agents reported 
that 2 ships, probably destroyers, have left Gibraltar in an easterly 
direction. 

Submarines were sighted off Tobruk and Trieste. 

Lively convoy traffic is reported from the eastern Mediterranean. 

Photo reconnaissance of Suez showed that tonnage at this harbor, 
contrary to the report of 25 Sep., had decreased by 80,000 GRT 
as compared with 23 Sep. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

2 motor mine sweepers transferring from Derna to Palermo 
arrived at Piraeus, where also a PT boat arrived from Porto Empedocle 
on 25 Sep. 

3« Transport of Supplies to Ncrth Africa ; 

The escorted "Steamer FOTJGIER was attac k e d b y 

-304- 



CONFIDENTIAL 



26 Sep. 19I+2 



30 miles north of Tobruk in the evening v^ile proceeding from 
Tobruk to Piraeus, Details are not yet available. Otherwise 
supply traffic from Italy and Greece to North Africa and North 
African coastal traffic proceeded according to plan. 

U. Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 
5» Black Sea s 

Enemy S it uation : 

Battleship PARIZHSKAYA KOMUNA, which by radio monitoring 
of 25 Sep. appeared to be at sea, was observed at Batum on the same 
day by air reconnaissance. The radio messacre may have been a ruse 
used by the patrol vessels. Lively shipping was observed in the 
Tuapse area. According to photo reconnaissance, the following 
ships were at Ochemchiri at noon of 25 Sep.: 3 submarines, 5 motor 
minesweepers, 1 PT boat, and several steamers. At the same time 
the following ships were at Poti : 3 cruisers, 2 warship hulls, 
3 destroyers, one of which was in dock, 3 minesweepers, 5 motor 
minesweepers, I4. PT boats, ll|. submarines, 11 steamers, 3 floating 
cvanes, etc. At Batum: 1 battleship (see above), 1 heavy cruiser, 
5 destroyers, 2 torpedo boats, 6 submarines, 6 motor minesweepers, 
2 PT boats, 2 passenger steamers, 6 tankers, 13 stearrers, etc. 

A great number of merchant vessels, tankers, lighters and tugboats 
were sighted at the Caspian Sea ports Astrakhan, Makhach Kala, Baku 
and Guryev and in the Ural River estuary. The only naval vessels 
at Astrakhan were 6 r^nesweepers. 

Own Situation : 

On 25 Sep. one of our convoys was unsuccessfully attacked 
by an enemy submarine 30 miles north-northeast of Constanta; 
enemy air activity caused minor damage only at Balaklava and 
Ivanbaba. Aerial mines were laid at the northern exit of Kerch 
Strait. Minesweeping operations and supply shipping proceeded 
according to plan. 

Special Items ; 

a. Naval Group South informs the Naval Staff Operations Division 
of its reply to the questionnaire submitted by the Naval Liaison 
Officer on the Army General Staff with regard to supply operations. 
(See Telegram I535.) 

b. The Admiral, Black Sea called the attention of Army Group A, 
with copy to the Air Commander, Crimea, to the necessity of rein- 
forcing the anti-aircraft defenses of the Crimean ports; he warned 
that no replacements are available for losses, so that the Army, 
I.e., Army Group A, may have to get along with fewer shipments. 

Group South notifies the Naval Staff of the above by Telegram 20I4.5 
and suggests that this information be forwarded to the Naval 
Representative on the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command. 

This was carried out. 

c. According to a communication from the Quartermaster, Armed 

-505- 



coyj-iJ£:: r:.-.i 

26 Sep. 19.L2 



tigh Command, Transnistria will no longer be part of 
3 Army 1 a zone of ODeration beginning 1 Oct. 191+2 in accordance 
■Ith a Fuehrer directive of 12 Sep. 191+2. The Liaison Staff of 
the 2-erman Ar-.ed Forces for Transnistria will stay there and will 
be under the authority of the ^hief of the German Army Mission 
in ?.j-ania. Its duties and authority remain unchanged. 



-■ 



'aval Stafi quartermaster Division has Informed Naval "-roup 
South, the Admiral j Llack Sea and the Baltic Naval Station to 
this effect. 



I v . Situation Last Asia 

lie , Headquarters report" that the Japanese advance toward 
Port Moresby has come to a halt for the time being since the 
transoo 't of heavv artillerv across the mountains is meetln - with 
: ficultles. 



I' 



Army Situation 

1. Russian Front: 



Army 



The enemy thrust at Shapsuskaya wH halted by C-erman 
forces and enemy pressure on the main hi.~h-.vay east of Abinskaya 
relieved. Cur operation in the direction of Tuapse is progressing 
according to plan. Cur attacks at the Terek River sector gained 
ground in southeasterly direction. . The eastern wing of cur spear- 
heads have .reached the bend of the railway of Vosnessenskaya . 

Army C-roup E : 

In the battle for Stalingrad, unit3 of the 9U fc h and 
71st Infantry Divisions reacheu the Volga River bank after a 
battle of several hours against stubborn enemy resistance. Ir.eny 

attacks at Kotluban were repulsed. An enemy thrust against .he l 

tend of our line north of Voronezh following a heavy artillery ' 

"rare and supported by ground attack planes was halted by a 
counterattack and eventually repulsed. Northwest of Rzhev the 
enemy attacked our bridgehead across the Volga 7iver under cover 
of fog. Me succeeded in breaking into our line, but will be 
mopoed up by reserves. 

Northern Army Croup : 

A number of enemy attacks against the forces which cut 
off the pocket south of Lake Ladoga were repulsed. At the Neva 
River sector the enemy was able to gain footholds on the eastern 

k in the Ducrovka area in several places. All of the enemy 
forces which had crossed the river were destroyed, except for 
a small bridgehead which was sealed off. 



-306- 



B-1052 



COIIfiJENTIAL 
26 Sep. 1$1|2 

2. Finn ish Front : 
Nothing to report. 

3. North Africa : 

Artillery fire increased during the night of 25 Sep. 
Otherwise the situation is unchanged. 

tt*tt*#*##4KHHHHMH»*HHHHHHHMt 



8-1052 
-307- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
27 Sep. 1 

Items of Poli~- tance 
Great Britain ; 

Eden stated in a speech that the last cor.voy which reached northern 
Russia carried the largest single shipment of war material ever made 
by Gre and the t less than 75 British warships were 

employed to escort the convoy consisting of 40 ships. The Minister 
commented also on the growing effect of British aerial v/arfare against 
Germany, which aims at destroying manufacturing sites and at paralyz- 
ing the intricate lerman communications system. For details see 
Political . 227, paragraph 1. 

Russi a ; 

In a press conference at Moscow, V/illkie advocated the speedy establish- 
ment of a second front statins that otherwise aid for Russia, which has 
already lost Z, 700,000 men, will come too late. The decision will'have 
to be made by the military authorities, of course. 

A widely read article in the Bern York Tines takes a different view, 
emphasizing that the clamor for a second front is absurd as long as 
such a front would serve Russian interests only, and not those of 
Britain and the U.S.A. 

Finland ; 

In an address to Parliament Prime Minister Rangell, defining Finnish 
foreign policy, stated that the country stands on Germany's side in 
its fight a.-ainst the Soviet Union. After the experiences had on the 
occasion of the first Russian attack, nothing could induce Finland 
to pursue another policy than one dictated by her own vital interests. 

Japan ; 

Prime Minister To jo, addressing the Imperial Rule Assistance Associa- 
tion, declared that endurance is one of the main factors in the 
present war. Japan is firmly resolved to destroy the Chungking Govern- 
ment. Japanese forces in Manchukuo are firmly protecting the northern 
frontier. Japan is determined to destroy the enemy in closest coopera- 
tion with the other Axis powers. 



Special Items : 

I. According to information received from the Operations Staff of 
the Armed Forces Command, the Fuehrer has ordered the transfer of 
the 5th Mountain Division to Norway with all its horses and equipment 
following completion of operation "Nordllcht" . 

The ordered exchange of division's stationed in Norway for fatigued com- 
bat divisions from the Eastern Front cannot take place prior to the 
beginning of November, since replacements from Germany will be avail- 
able only after 1 Nov. 

The Chief, Shipping and Transport Branch, Naval Staff Quartermaster 
Division is informed to this effect. 



-308- 



B-1C52 



: 



CONFIDENTIAL 
27 Sep. 1942 

II. The Naval Staff directs Group North and the Fleet to transfer the 
SCHARNHOHST and NUERNBERG to the north area by early November, together 
with all destroyers ready for operations by that time. 

III. The German General attached to Headquarters of the Italian High 
Command reports to the Operations Staff, Armed Forces High Command thar 
the situation in North Africa was discussed in a conference at the 
Italian High Command on 23 Sep. at which Field Marshal Rommel, who was 
passing through, Field Marshal Kesselrlng and Marshal Cavallero were x 
present. Field Marshal Romnel stated that a British attack is to be 
expected in October. For this assault the Panzer Army must be equipped 
with adequate supplies in order to be able to launch an offensive of 
its own after repelling the attack. Tills presupposes that Malta is 
paralyzed, which the Commanding General, Armed Forces, South promised 
to achieve by increasing aerial attacks to a maximum by early October. 
In connection with the requested supplies, Cavallero outlined the 
existing difficulties which consist mainly in the lack of escort forces, 
The Italian High Command considers transferring a cruiser division andj 
escort destroyers to the Aegean Sea; this would reinforce the defense 
of Crete, afford a favorable flanking position against naval actions, 
and increase the number of escort vessels available for North African 
transports by placing the destroyers at their disposal. A fuel oil 
stock of 20,000 tons in the Aegean .area is, of course, a prerequisite! 
for this step. 

IV. A letter (Ob. d. M. M Wa Wi 24500/42 geh. ) addressed to the 
Minister of Armament and War Production by the Commander in Chief, Navy 
was prompted by the unjustifiable interference with building projects 
of strategic importance at Wilhelmshaven on the part of the Minister's 
regional representative for the Weser-Ems district. For copy see War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. V. 



Situation 27 Sep. 1942 

I. War in Foreign Waters 

1. Enemy Situation : 

North Atlantic ; 

A force reported at 36° N, 11° W on 23 Sep. is believed to be 
the RAMILLIES with an escort of 4 destroyers. 

South Atlantic : 

At 1345 a submarine warning signal originating from an un- 
identified ship at 24o 55' S, 21° 51' W was rebroadcast by Freetown. 
On 26 Sep. Ascension transmitted a coded QQQ message from the British 
steamer SHERIDAN. The German Consul at Santa Isabel reports a 10,000 
GRT steamer which passed under escort of a submarine in the direction 
of Duala on 24 Sep. 

Indian Ocean ; 

According to an intelligence report based on statements of a 
crew member from a British steamer, a large transport vessel was rammed 
at Capetown around the end of July with the loss of 200 men and 2,000 
mail bags. According to the same source, 1 destroyer and 7 merchant 



8-105 2 



-309- 



27 Sep. 1942 

sela were sunk and 2 large warships and harbor installations damaged 
during a Japanese air raid on Colombo; unfortunately, the date of this 
attack could not be ascertained. 

On 26 Sep. Radio Colonbo flashed a QQQ signal of the U.S. steamer 

and stated that a suspicious vessel resembling the Danish vessel 
IDGIA followed her for about half an hour at 13° S, 56° S. 

This report probably refers to a Japanese ship. 

r^rding to report of the Consulate at Lourenco Karques a convoy of 
35 ships carrying troops and planes arrived at Capetown, from where it 
will sail for Aden on 28 Sep. There it is to be split, one section 

:eeiing to Egypt, the other to Basra. 

2. Own Situation : 

Ho reports were received fron our ships in foreign waters. 

All our ships in foreign waters are notified of the sailing instructions 
for the DR2SDE3 and KULIERLAND by Radiogram 1016, 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo is informed about names of ships suitable as 
cover names for the RAISES. See Telegram 1500. 



II. Situation ".Vest Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 

thing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

In the late afternoon of 26 Sep. 12 enemy fighters attacked 
Brest and Mprlalx. 2 Spitfires were shot down by naval antiaircraft 
artillery and several others by German fighters. 

The blockade-runner BRAKE sailed for Japan on schedule. 

Group North advised the BRAKE by Telegram 1304 to avoid Spanish terri- 
torial waters as much as possible. A forecast of the weather to ue 
expected en route was transmitted to her by Telegram 1916; visibility 
will be e to 4 miles and turbulance clouds at 300 m. to 400 n. 

Channel Coast : 

18 vessels of the 2nd, 4th and 6th PT Boat Flotillas laid 
~Lr.es in irregular pattern and with wide intervals off the Humber mouth 
during the night of 26 Sep. For short reports see Telegrams 1730 and 
2255. 

The blockade-runner BDRGENIAHD is scheduled to sail on 28 Sep. 



B-1052 

-310- 



r 



COKFIDSIiTIAL 
27 Sep. 1942 

III. North Sea. Norway. Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation: 

A number of enemy planes penetrated into the German Bight 
area during the night of 26 Sep. Aerial mines are suspected north of 
the Frisian Islands. One plane was shot down off Hook of Holland. 

North of the harbor entrance of Nook of Holland approximately 15 ground 
mines were swept, which had evidently been laid by PT boats as reported 
on 26 Sep. 

Convoys to Holland were postponed 24 hours due to fog and mine hazard 
off Hook of Holland. Otherwise escort and patrol service proceeded 
according to plan. 

2. Norway and Arctic Ocean ; 
Enemy Situation: 

Air reconnaissance of the Arctic Ocean as far as Spitsbergen 
revealed nothing of tactical interest. 

Own Situation : 

A Russian battery on Rybachi Peninsula shelled Petsano be- 
tween 2308 on 25 Sep. and 0452 on 26 Sep. with intervals of 10 minutes 
between shots. We replied with 6 shots without observing any re- 
sults. Enemy air activity over the Arctic and west coasts on 25 and 
26 Sep. One of our convoys was unsuccessfully bombed off the Arctic 
coast at 0710 of 27 Sep. Otherwise convoy service proceeded according 
to plan. One of our harbor defense vessels was rammed and sunk in 
Boemmel Fjord by a Norwegian steamer. The question of responsibility 
is under investigation. 

The mine-laying ships ROLAND, KAISER, and SKAGERRAK- arrived at Kristian 
sand South from the south. 

Group North reports that the forces engaged in operation "Zarin" will 
reach the island waters at 0400 of 28 Sep. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

During the night of 27 Sep. enemy planes flew harassing and mine- 
laying missions in the Baltic Sea entrances, Kiel Bay, Luebeck Bay and 
the Flensburger Foerde. It is suspected that aerial mines were laid. 
Channel-sweeping operations were delayed due to fog. A mine was swept 
off Apenrade. 

Mine-sweeping in the Gulf of Finland had to be canceled owing to bad 
weather but proceeded according to plan in Riga Bay. 



B-1052 

-311- 



CONFIDENT!^ 



27 Sep. 1942 



At noon a convoy from Abo to Oulu v;a3 attacked by an enemy submarine 
30 miles west of Vasa. Tanker r.ITTELI.IEER with 800 tons of aviation 
gasoline received a torpedo hit and burst in flames. The vessel is 
still afloat and an attempt is being made to tow her to Vasa. The 
fire is under control. 

As reported by the Armed Forces High Command, Operations Staff, the 
Fuehrer ordered in directive no. 40 that the island of Tytersaari v.'.ich 
lies in front of the Army operations zone be placed under the 11th 
Army's authority. 

The Naval Staff informs Group North accordingly. 



V. Subnnrinft Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

Reconnaissance activity in the northern rendezvous area was 
lively, probably on account of an approaching convoy; normal recon- 
;.ul£c nee only in the southern area. 

An unidentified British steamer flashed a Q&Q signal approximately 100 
miles northwest of Capetown; the report was later canceled. A sub- 
marine sighting report was intercepted from the middle South Atlantic. 

Own Situation ; 

Another submarine left for the zone of operations. 

In the North Atlantic, contact could not be reestablished with the 
outbound convoy observed by submarine U "617". Group "Tiger" re- 
inforced by 2 submarines has orders to continue the search on a 
westerly course. 

Submarine U "404" encountered 2 large steamers of a new type, with one 
funnel and one short thick mast; following an attack on them, the boat 
observed a detonation and sinking noises. 

A new group "Luchs", formed of 13 submarines, is to proceed at cruising 
speed to a patrol line extending from quadrant AK 6653 to quadrant 
AL 9814, where a convoy sailing on a southwesterly course can be ex- 
pected to arrive on 30 Sep. 

Submarine TJ "177" encountered a subchaser force consisting of fast 
single ships in quadrant AL 5640 which located the boat. 

In quadrant FA 2385 in the West Indies submarine U "514" torpedoed 2 
steaners totalling 10,000 GRT which were proceeding in a convoy. 

For additional reports see supplement to submarine situation in War 
Diary, Part B, Vol. IV. 

The Commander in Chief, Navy orders once more explicitly that all sub- 
marine captains are to be strongly reminded to adhere strictly to all 
instructions concerning the treatment of neutral ships. The Command- 
ing Admiral, Submarines issued an order to this effect. 



B-1052 

-312- 



CONFIDENT I AI 
27 Sep. 1^42 

Complying with a suggestion of the Commanding Admiral, Submarines to 
the Executive Office of the Commander in Chief, Navy with copy to the 
Naval Staff, the following special communique of the Armed Forces High 
Command is made public : 

A fast enemy convoy, consisting of a few large passenger liners only, 
heavily guarded and carrying troops, ammunition and other war material 
was intercepted on its way from America to the British Isles by Germ< n 
submarines in the North Atlantic; it was pursued and engaged in a 
bitter battle which lasted several days. 

We sank a 19,000 GRT 2-funneled steamer of the VICEROY OF INDIA class, 
which capsized after being hit by 3 torpedoes; a 17,000 GRT 2-funneled 
steamer, class REINA DEL PACIFICO, which exploded with a large burst 
of flame after receiving 2 torpedo hits; an 11,000 GRT transport of th|e 
DERBYSHIRE class. In addition, we sank one of the escort destroyers 
and damaged 2 other transports by torpedo hits. These losses con- 
stitute a severe blow to enemy warfare. 

The sinkings referred to concern the AT convoy attacked on 25 and 26 
Sep. by submarines U "216", U "96", U "619", U "404", and U "91". (See 
War Diary 25 and 26 Sep. and Telegram 1850.) 



VI. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity ; 

Little reconnaissance activity during the day and no night 
operations. During the attack by 12 Spitfires and fighter bombers on 
Brest and Morlaix (see Situation West Area) around 1900 of 26 Sep., 9 
enemy planes either were shot down or crashed. Rescue and search 
measures were taken by the enemy for all of the 12 planes engaged in 
this action. 

2. Mediterranean Theater : 

A total of 8 enemy planes v/as shot down on 26 Sep. by the new 
Me 109 G 2, some of them at altitudes exceeding 8,000 m. 



Harassing attacks were carried out east of El Alamein. The Heliopolis 
airfield was raided by 10 Ju 88' s. A photo reconnaissance mission was 
flown over Alexandria. 

3. Eastern Front : 

50 enemy planes were shot down on 26 Sep. and an additional 
65 on 27 Sep. 

It is reported that a steamer was damaged by a bomb hit off Tuapse on 
26 Sep. 

13 more enemy planes v/ere shot down in the Arctic Ocean without any 
losses of our own. 

Photo reconnaissance v/as conducted over Kola Bay. 



B-1052 

-313- 



CO": INITIA L 
27 Sep. 1942 

"~I. Warfare In the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

A convoy of 5 loaded freighters escorted by 2 destroyers and 
1 corvette arrived at Gibraltar from the Atlantic in the evening of 26 
Sep. According to an intelligence report from Spain, the Strait of 
Gibraltar has been under close observation for the past few days, 
apparently in anticipation of passing submarines which lad been sighted. 

Radio monitoring intercepted messages from unidentified British ships 
in the waters of Alexandria and east of Rhodes. Apart fro: light na- 
val forces, 11 steamers of 62,000 GRT were anchored at Alexandria. 

2. Own Situation. Mediterranean : 

The motor minesweepers R "10" and R "16" sailed from 
Piraeus for Patras. 

Tobruk and Benghazi were attacked by enemy planes c The outer pier of 
Benghazi" received a bomb hit. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa 1 

The convoy of motor ships BARBARO and UNI ONE were repeatedly 
attacked by submarines and torpedo planes while proceeding to Benghazi. 
Both ships were hit by one torpedo each and efforts are being made to 
tow them to Navarino. The UNI ONE (6,071 GRT) carried 2,110 tons of 
supplies, 15 guns, 103 motor vehicles and 72 men, all German, the 
BARBARO (6,342 GRT) an Italian cargo. Otherwise supply and coastal 
traffic proceeded without major incident. 

4. Area Naval Group South ; 
Aegean Sea : 

Nothing to report. 

Black Sea ; 

Eneny Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

The 1st PT Boat Flotilla operated during the night of 26 
Sep. between Tuapse and Cape Idukopas. PT boat S "26" sank a 1,000 
GRT steamer at anchor in spite of strong defense by 3 patrol vessels. 

The Italian subchasers were idle due to the lack of fuel; supplies are 
under way. 3 Italian submarines arrived at Skadovsk and will transfer 
to Feodosiya. 

A cutter of the Neumann command sank in an engagement at ITovorossisk 
after suffering a hit below the water line. 

Enemy air activity at Kerch, Taman (where 1 naval barge and 1 SiebeL 
ferry were damaged), Yalta, Ivanbaba, and Mariupol. It is suspected 
that aerial mines were laid. 



B-1C5 2 



I 



*> 



~< 



CONFIDENTIAL 
27 Sep. 1942 

Mine-sweeping and escort operations proceeded according to plan. Cargo 
ship VOLGO-DON is already operating in the Sea of Azov. 

Group South proposes to transfer 20 motor launches from Germany to the 
Aegean Sea and the Black Sea. (See Telegram 1530.) 

The matter is being attended to by the Naval Staff Quartermaster 
Division. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 
Nothing to report. 



IX. Army Situation 

1. . Russian Front ; 

Army Group A t 

We succeeded in halting enemy attacks at Krimskaya. Our 
offensive toward Tuapse is making headway against strong enemy re- 
sistance. The bridgehead over the Terek River west of Mai sky was 
widened. A bitter battle is being waged in the Kardzhin area. 

Army Group B t 

The battle for Stalingrad continues in and around the city, 
where a few more blocks were captured. The 100th Light Infantry 
Division, the 24th Panzer Division and the 389th Infantry Division 
launched an attack in the northern sector. 

All enemy thrusts against the land bridge at Kotluban were repulsed, as 
was an attack north of Voronezh. 

Central Army Group ; 

South of Novosil the enemy succeeded in penetrating our 
lines in a surprise attack. A counterattack is in progress. Strong 
enemy attacks at Zubtsov and north of the Volga River were repulsed; 
the enemy also attacked the bridgehead north of Rzhev and the pene- 
tration point northwest of the town. Our forces were successful in 
the Demidov and Velizh areas. 

Northern Army Group ; 

Our offensive to widen the land bridge to the II Army Corps 
in a westerly direction was launched from the south and gained a few 
kilometers of ground. Fighting on the Neva River sector resulted in 
local gains. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

With the exception of futile enemy attacks at the southern 
wing of the Kandalaksha sector only gunfire and scouting activity. 



B-1052 

-515- 



CONFIDENTIAL 
27 Sep. 1942 

3. North Africa : 

Normal artillery and reconnaissance activity. 

w wa i mmmmmHHm HHK m m*H8« 



-316- 



8-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
28 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Great Britain : 

General Wavell declared In an address that the second front will be 
established, although there Is still much bitter fighting ahead for 
the Anglo-American forces before this can be done. It is his im- 
pression that Russia will hold out. Germany is planning a pincers 
operation in the Near East for 1943 from Egypt and from the Caucasus, 
possibly also across Turkey. The preparations for this drive, however, 
have not been very successful as yet, and the strategic goals set 
for 1942 have not by any means been attained. Germany has not been 
able to eliminate th^ Russian Army, and a winter campaign is thus un- 
avoidable, particularly if Stalingrad continues to resist. The African 
pincers have been halted and there is hope that they can be driven back 
a considerable distance. Japan can be compared to a boa constrictor 
which has swallowed a large bite and needs a long time to digest it. 
Japan does not have the ships to take the offensive against the naval 
forces of the Allies and in addition, Russia constitutes a permanent 
threat. Therefore Japan must try to solve the Chinese problem and 
while doing so is hardly in a position to carry out another large-scale 
invasion (this refers probably to India). It is of paramount strategic 
importance for Great Britain to retake Burma. The ship losses, though 
heavy, are not heavy enough to prevent a British final victory, all 
the more as the losses sustained by the Axis powers are much greater. 
Germany must be beaten first. With regard to a date for the final 
victory, Wavell confidentially made en estimate which, according to the 
Delhi radio which broadcast the speech, was not discouraging. 

The Transocean News Agency reports from Ankara that the attitude of the 
Anglo-American Powers is being sharply criticized in Moscow. All con- 
tact between Anglo-American and Russian circles in Ankara has ceased 
completely. 

Iberian Peninsula ; 

Relations between Spain and Portugal have recently become considerably 
more amicable. Well- in formed Lisbon circles are convinced that the 
existing non-aggression and friendship pact will shortly become a mutual 
assistance pact. 

Russia : 

The Soviet Government has recognized the French National Committee 
(De Gaulle) as the sole authority entitled to represent French in- 
terests with the Soviet Government, and thus went considerably farther 
than its British and American allies. 



Special Items : 

I. According to a report by the Military Attache at Helsinki, the 
U.S. Military Attache, Lt. Col. Huthsteiner remarked about a week ago 
that the following Allied operations are planned for the spring of 1943: 

1. Landing on the Danish coast and if possible a simultaneous 
landing at the Channel or northern French coast. 



-317- 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



28 Sep. 1942 



2. Large-scale landings at several points of the Norwegian 'coast, 
with the aid of 3,000 Norwegian paratroopers. 

3. Landing of U.S. forces on the Atlantic coast of Morocco, a 
thrust toward Tripoli and merger with the British coming up from Egypt 
following destruction of the German and Italian North African Army. 

4. The French North African coast is to be the basis for future 
operations against Italy aiming at separating this country from the 
Axis. 

Paragraphs 3 and 4 very likely represent the Allied 
strategic goals for 1943, while paragraphs 1 and 2 may 
indicate diversionary maneuvers. 

An intelligence report from the early part of September deserves atten- 
tion, too. It comes from a reputedly very reliable source with ex- 
cellent connections to the Swiss Array General Staff and is based on 
London information of the Swiss Intelligence Service. According to 
this report, a strong bridgehead is to be established in Norway this 
fall in anticipation of a future second front. A number of minor 

commando raids are still to be made at the western front and at the ' 

same time a landing is to be made in Norway by large forces consisting 
in the main of U.S. troops. There are quite a number of reports in 
the possession of the Swiss Intelligence Service concerning naval and 
troop concentrations which have been made for this purpose. 

II. Conference v/ith the Chief, Naval Staff was held in preparation 
for a report to the Fuehrer on submarine warfare. Minutes of the con- 
ference are being recorded by the Chief, Submarine Division, Naval 
Staff. 

Since the Fuehrer was present at the traditional address to the 
officer candidates of the Armed Forces in Berlin, a conference on sub- 
marine warfare was held in the afternoon. 

Minutes of this conference will be filedi 



Situation 


28 


Sop. 1942 


I. War 


in 


Foreign Waters 



1. Enemy Situation : 

North Atlantic : 

The aircraft carrier LEXINGTON was launched at Quincy, Mass. 
on 26 Sep., 15 months after her keel was laid and one year ahead of 
schedule. The first ship of this type, the ESSEX, was launched on 31 
Jul. 

Indian Ocean : 

According to a report of the German Consulate at Lourenco 
Marques, a convoy of 12 ships sailed on 19 Sep. from Capetown for 
Australia with U.S. troops and a cargo of planes. 3 British submarines 
left Simon's Town on 21 Sep. for Aden and Mombasa. Steamer QUEEN 
ELIZABETH is expected to pass through Lourenco Marques for Suez on 10 
Oct. Mombasa is a secondary naval base. 

-318- B - 1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
28 Sep. 1942 

At 2500 Radio Simon's Town rebroadcast a QAQ. signal originating from 
the British steamer OCEAN VANITY, which sighted a suspicious vessel 
at 2235 at 32o 43' S, 290 00' E. The report was cancelled at 2312. 

2. Own Situation ; 

The Naval Attache at Tokyo points out that the permission 
granted to German vessels to transmit or receive radio messages is 
valid only during their voyage to or from southern Japanese ports and 
not for the main island. Special regulations also apply to Batavia. 

The Attache also calls attention to incorrect statements of the Naval 
Staff concerning the steamers ASAMA MARU and CONTE VERDE, since the 
latter is at anchor at Shanghai and the former in the service of the 
Japanese Navy. (See Telegram 2001.) 

Enemy situation report to ships in foreign waters by Radiogram 2239. 



II. Situation West Area 

Atlantic Coast ; 

Weather reports transmitted to the BRAKE by Group West indicate 
relatively low visibility and favorable conditions for the break- 
through. 

The sailing of the BURGENLAND was postponed by 24 hours on account of 
fog. 

Channel Coast : 

The 5th PT Boat Flotilla is scheduled to carry out a mine-laying 
mission off Start Point during the night of 28 Sep. One mine was 
swept in quadrant BF 2929. The convoy route was closed between points 
334 and 336. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea : 

Ships of the Maas Flotilla were strafed off Goeree by 15 
Spitfires while towing one of their vessels which had run aground in a 
fog; they suffered danage and casualties. 

A ground mine was swept in quadrant AN 8584. Escort and patrol servic^ 
suffered from bad weather. 

2. Norway ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

For reports concerning plans for landings see Special Items, f, 



B-1052 

-319- 



28 Sep-. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

Own Situation : 

Enemy air activity centered on the Arctic and west coasts dur- 
ing 26 and 27 Sep. Bombs vere dropped on Kirkenes airfield and on one 
of our westbound convoys off Sylt Fjord without causing damage. 80 
bombs were dropped on Banak airfield. 1 plane was destroyed by fire 
and 5 others damaged. 

The mine-laying ships ROLAND and KAISER as well as 6 vessels of the 17th 
Subchaser Flotilla carried out a mine-laying mission from their base 
at Kristiansand South according to plan. (Deep flanking minefields in 
the area between Stavanger and Lister. 

The Naval Staff directs the Commanding Admiral, Norway, with copies to 
Group North, the Admiral Arctic Ocean, the Fleet, and the Commanding 
Admiral, Cruisers to get in touch with the Fleet (Commanding Admiral, 
Cruisers) and the Admiral, Arctic Ocean and to comment jointly on the 
question of where the enemy has a better chance to prevent the sailing 
of our ships through submarines and mines, at Trondheim or at Narvik? 
The Naval Staff wants to know where enemy submarines find better oper- 
ating possibilities and where our defenses are more effective. 

Where are geographical conditions more favorable for laying mines? 
Where can the enemy lay mines more readily undetected and unhampered? 
Where is it simpler for us to sweep mines, considering the present state 
of our defenses? 

The report is to be submitted through Group North. 

3. Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Nothing to report. 

Own Situation : 

The HIPPER force entered Kaa Fjord at 0700; operation "Zarin" 
was carried out according to plan. All 4 destroyers were damaged some- 
what by the heavy seas. The HIPPER sprang a leak in the boiler plant 
and is not entirely ready for operations. 

For a brief report of the Commanding Admiral, Cruisers see l/Skl 
24024/42 Gkdos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. Ila. 

The Naval Staff believes that mining operation "Zarin" 
in quadrant AT 16 was carried out somewhat late in the 
season, since shipping around the northern tip of Novaya 
Zemlya stops during October because of the ice situation. 
On the other hand a minefield in quadrant AT 4817 as 
suggested by Group North would interfere with our sub- 
marine operations in the entrance of the White Sea to 
such an extent that it would cancel the advantages in 
mining that area. Thus the Admiral, Arctic Ocean had 
only the choice of following the original plan or giving 
up the idea of laying a minefield altogether. Further- 
more, the Naval Staff has not been informed of the 
opinion of the Admiral, Arctic Ocean in this matter. 



- 520 - 



28 Sep. 19 h P- CONFIDENTIAL 

IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Ent rances, Baltic Sea 

No special incidents in the area of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, 
Baltic Sea. Steamer FRANZ RUDOLF (1,^19 GRT) sank at 0400 off the 
Pomeranian coast tn quadrant AO 8612 for reasons a3 yet unknovn. Dur- 
ing maneuvers in quadrant AO 9812 near Gdynia 5 mines exploded. 1 tor- 
pedo recovery vessel vas damaged. 

Calling attention to the great number of enemy mines in the Baltic Sea, 
especially the eastern Baltic Sea and the Bay of Danzig, which jeopar- 
dizes submarine training greatly, the Naval Staff requests the Air Force 
Operations Staff to take measures to combat enemy planes by providing 
sufficient numbers of night fighters, since the Navel Staff must require 
that' enemy planes are fought off in the west before they can drop mines. 
VTe cannot afford to have submarine training interrupted and hampered, 
and must prevent this with all possible means. The A.ir Force Operations 
Staff is requested to report steps taken. 

No special incidents in the area of the Commander, Mine Sweepers, Baltic 
Sea. Subchase near Steinort was unsuccessful. Tanker MITTELEEER ar- 
rived at Vasa under her own power. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

Because of increased danger of air attack the ermament of British mer- 
chant vessels is being reinforced as regards the number and size of the 
guns . 

Eetween 15 May and 31 Jul. 93*500 tons of supplies were shipped from 
U.S. ports to the Persian Gulf. Not counting troop transports, 30 to 
ho ships of 5,000 GRT each are being used for this purpose. 

For these and other reports concerning foreign merchant shipping see 
Brief Report No. 32/42 of the Naval Intelligence Division, Foreign 
Merchant Marine Branch. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

The British Admiralty announced the loss of submarine THORN, 
which probably had been stationed in home waters. According to the 
radio intercept service, the British steamer BARON SALT0UN {3,^0^ GRT) 
sent an SOS signal from southwest of the Azores at 2127, and an uniden- 
tified ship from 130 miles southeast of Reykjavik at 2003. 

British ships were located 150 miles southwest of Rockall Bank, and 
35 and 155 miles northwest of Porcupine Bank. At 1315 a Sunderland plane 
reported a submarine 650 miles southwest of Rockall Bank, and evidently 
in connection with this reported an attack on a submarine. Air recon- 
naissance of both groups over the rendezvous area furnished no special 
information. 

2. Own Situation : 

3 more submarines left for the zone of operations. 



B-1052 

- 321 - 



28 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

No success reports were received from the submarines in the North Atlan- 
tic, off the U.S. east coast, in the South Atlantic, and the Mediterran- 
ean. 

In the Vest Indies, however, submarine U "175" sank a 6,000 GRT 
steamer in quadrant E0 1396, a 3,550 GRT steamer in quadrant E0 1497, 
and a 4,500 GRT steamer in quadrant E0 1446. Submarine U "332" reported 
sinking steamer REGISTAN (5,886 GRT) in quadrant EE 8l84. 

For details see supplement to submarine situation in War Diary, Part B, 
Vol. IV. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

During the day reconnaissance and fighter bomber missions 
were flown. 

In the Great Yarmouth area 1 steamer of 1,500 to 2,000 GRT proceeding 
in a convoy of 6 steamers and 2 destroyers was damaged at 1055. A sim- 
ilar success was reported from the Cape Finis terre area. 

2. Mediterranean Theater ; 

Convoy and reconnaissance missions, nuisance raids, and attacks 
on ships in the Suez roadstead were carried out without observed effect. 

3. Eastern Front ; 

The General of the Air Force reported 5^ planes shot down at 
the Army front. Otherwise nothing special to report. 



VIII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean ; 

Messages intercepted by the radio intercept service indicate 
that submarines are being transferred from home waters or Gibraltar 
to the Mediterranean, or that supplies are about to be shipped to 
Malta, possibly simultaneously from the east and the west. 

Contradictory agent reports stating that a convoy passed through the 
Strait of Gibraltar during the night of 26 September had not been con- 
firmed by air reconnaissance by 1500. 

Between 1900 and 2055 radar located first 7, and later a total of 18 
ships off Marsa Matruh 3 to 10 miles off the coast. At the same time 
an air attack was made on Marsa Matruh. A message was picked up from 
Marsa Matruh reporting an attack by surface forces at 1958. The report 
was not confirmed. 

According to an Italian report, British destroyers arrived in the eastern 
Mediterranean from the Red Sea. Furthermore a convoy is to be escorted 
to Malta from the eastern Mediterranean under especially heavy air 



9-1052 

- 322 - 



28 Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

cover in the beginning of October. 

According to another Italian agent report, important documents were sent 
to Madrid by Spanish authorities, which were obtained from the British 
plane which crashed near Cadiz on 25 Sep.; the crew perished. The doc- 
uments are in French, dated 22 Sep., and deal with British attacks on 
French Morocco, Tunisia, and other spots In French North Africa. 

An investigation has been started at once. The outcome 
must be awaited. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean ; 

During the night of 27 Sep., enemy planes attacked Benghazi, 
damaging buildings . The Naval Staff at once telephoned to the Naval 
Representatives at the Armed Forces Operations Staff, the Air Force Op- 
erations Staff and the Army High Command the report received at 2201 
from the German Naval Command, Italy concerning ships located off Marsa 
Matruh and the message concerning the attack (see Enemy Situation). 
At 2350 the German Naval Command, Italy reported that no enemy action 
was confirmed. At 2125 the alert was cancelled, since no further ships 
were located. 

The Armed Forces Operations Staff Informed the German General at Rome 
about the suggestion made by the Naval Staff to the Armed Forces High 
Command for the German Naval Command, Italy concerning the mining of 
French territorial waters off Cape Bon. (See War Diary_ 25 Sep.) The 
Armed Forces Operations Staff asked the German General at Rome to sup- 
port this suggestion, which was approved by the Armed Forces High Com- 
mand, together with the German Admiral, Rome, at the Italian Armed 
Forces High Command. For copy of the telegram of the Armed Forces Op- 
erations Staff to the Naval Staff see l/Skl 2403 V 1 * 2 Gkdos. in War 
Diary, Part C, Vol. XIII. The telegram was approved by the Fuehrer. 

The Naval Staff informed the German Naval Command, Italy accordingly. 

The German Naval Command, Italy takes the following stand concerning 
the wish of Naval Group, South to make available naval barges for the 
Admiral, Aegean Sea: 

a. So far Ik naval barges of the 35 built in the first 2 
series have been lost. Of the remaining 21 naval barges, only 9 are 
fully ready for operations, and 13 are ready to a limited extent. 3 
naval barges are in transfer to North Africa. 

b. Under present conditions naval barges are the only means 
for transporting coastal supplies between Tobruk and Marsa Matruh. In 
spite of maximum utilization of the barges, supplies are Insufficient 
for the front. In view of the extremely critical supply situation, 
every effort must be made to increase the number of naval barges. 

c. Therefore it is suggested that the 4 naval barges still 
in the Aegean area be transferred to the German Naval Command, Italy 
for North Africa. In return the Admiral, Aegean Sea will receive a 
steamer to be selected for the purpose which will have the same cargo 
apace. 

The Naval Staff believes this suggestion appropriate. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa ; 

Motor ship BARBARO sank during the night of 27 Sep. while 



- 523 - 8-1052 



28 Sep. 1 COKFIDBKTIAL 

-ng toved into rino. Contrary to earlier reports, unfortunately 
considerable qua Lea of German fuel for the Amy, Navy, and ;.ir Force,' 
as well as ljc motor vehicles, were on board. 

During air attacks on Benghazi and Tobruk, 1 Italian motor barge was 
sunk and steamer SYBILLA (1,077 GRT) was damaged and grounded.^ 

Air attacks on the convoy of steamer FOUGIEB were unsuccessful. 

Otherwise supply and convoy traffic proceeded without incidents. 

4. Ares Raval Croup South: 

i i - ■ ■ ■ 

Aegean Sea : 

lag to report. 

Black Sea : 

Zr.ery Situation : 

Lively reconnaissance and combat missions against supply traf- 
fic along the Crimean coast were continued. Ivanbaba was again attacked . 
In the night of 26 Sep., 3 PT boats tried to approach Ivanbaba but 
turned away when fired upon. Group South assumes that the operation 
was in connection with mining operations and air attacks. 

According to air reconnaissance and radio intelligence, 7 ships were 
east of Yalta at 1S30 on 27 Sep., and at 1930 one westbound destroyer 
was south of Yalta. Fire from Yalta was unsuccessful. On 27 Sep. in 
the afternoon a submarine was sighted and attacked with depth bombs be- 
tween Ak Mechet and Zarkhankut . 

Outside of the Danube delta at Ochakov South a submarine made an unsuc- 
cessful attack on the Rumanian torpedo boat NALUCA from a great distance . 

The Admiral, Black Sea and Group South assume that the submarine is 
operating in order to disrupt convoy traffic and to prevent withdrawal 
of German troops in the Crimea to the Caucasus. It is not considered 
likely that an operation against the Crimean coast is being planned. 

On 25 Sen. German air reconnaissance sighted daytine ship traffic near 
Gelendzhik, Tuapse, and Gagry. 

Own Situation : 

2 Italian subschasers were sent out on patrol after enemy 
forces were sighted south of Feodosiya. 

Kinesveeping, convoy, and transport traffic proceeded according to 
plan in the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. 

Group South reports that the staff of the Admiral, Black Sea has been 
ordered to transfer speedily from Bucharest to Simferopol. The Admiral, 
Black Sea will set up a Naval Liaison Staff, Rumania. (See Telegram 
2000.) 

The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division will take further steps. 

The Naval Staff sends the following instructions to Naval Group South 
and the Naval Liaison Officer to the Army High Command (with copy to 
the Admiral, Black Sea) on the basis of the statem-e sde by the Naval 



- 324 - 



28 Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

Liaison Officer at the Army General Staff to Group South about Army sup- 
plies (see War Diary 25 Sep.): 

a. It is impossible to transfer additional motor mine sweeper 
flotillas to the Black Sea, since due to the increased British mine of- 
fensive the forces still In Germany are hardly adequate for tasks there. 

b. The Naval Staff instructs the Naval Liaison Officer at 
the Army General Staff to get in touch with the Chief of Staff of the 
Admiral, Black Sea personally. (See Telegram 1719.) 



IX. Situation East Asia 
Nothing special to report. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

The operation in the direction of Tuapse Is making slow 
progress. At the Caucasian front enemy attacks were repulsed at the 
Sancharo Pass. In the Terek sector enemy positions at the Kharista 
were rroken through; the Baksan bridgehead was widened. Sovietski 
was stormed* 

Army Group B : 

The battle for Stalingrad is continuing with undiminished 
fury. Further sections of the city were taken. Enemy pressure con- 
tinues in the Kotluban area. Several enemy attacks were repulsed. 

Central Army Group ; 

Enemy attacks were repulsed at Orel and in the Rzhev area. 

Northern Army Group : 

At the Neva River, the enemy succeeded in establishing p 
bridgehead 2 kilometers wide and 1 kilometer deep across from Dubrovka, 
The bridgehead was sealed off. 

2. Finnish Front : 

Enemy reconnaissance activity on the southeast front, in the 
Loukhi sector, and at the neck of the Rybachi Peninsula. 

3. North Afric a: 

No situation report has been received c 



************************* 



- 325 - 



6-1052 



CONFIDENTIAL 
29 Sep. 1942 

Items of Political Importance 

Willkie's statement in Moscow has set off new discussions concerning the 
second front in Europe. Attlee reprimanded Willkie sharply, stating 
that the leaders of the Allies do not need a public reminder on this 
subject. Furthermore there is complete accord among the Allies about 
war plans. The Sunday Times demands that the main emphasis be put on 
aerial bombardment of Germany. With reference to Willkie's statement, 
Secretary of State Hull declared that no change has occurred in Allied 
plans. 



Special Items 

The Commander, Destroyers reported the following information about tor- 
pedo boats in October 1942: 



Situation 29 Sep. 1942 
I. War in Foreign Waters 
1. Enemy Situation. 






1 . At the disposal of Group West : 

a. The Chief of the 3rd Torpedo Boat Flotilla with torpedo boats 
T "4", T "10", T "13" (flotilla leader), T "lV, T "18", T "19"; of 
these T "13", T "18", and T "19" will not be ready for operations until 
approximately the middle of October. 

b. The Chief of the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla with T "22", T "23" 
(flotilla leader), and the FALKE will become available approximately 

7 October following maneuvers. • 

2. At the disposal of Group North ; 

T "9" and T "12" in the Norwegian area. 

3. At the disposal of the Torpedo Inspectorat e for firing practice 
from 5 to 24 Oct.: T "16", T "I7", T "20", the GREIF, and the K0ND0R, 
insofar as these vessels do not have sufficient fuel to carry out ma- 
neuvers of their own. 

4. In the shipyards for overhaul and repair : 

T "2" (to be commissioned with the crew of T "7"), T "5", T "7", T "11", 
T "15", the MOSWE, and the JAGUAR. 

5. In training : 

T "21", the JAGUAR, the GREIF, and the K0ND0R (cf. paragraph 3). 

6. Warship Construction Testing Command : 

T "24" after commissioning, T "21" for final trials. 



- 326 - 



B- 1 C 5 2 



29 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

No r th ^A : t 1 ant 1c : 

According to an intelligence report from Portugal a convoy 
carrying troops for the Middle East left U.S. porta between 19 and 21 
Sep. escorted by light cruisers. The 3ize cf the convey is unknown. 

Indian Oc ean : 

Radio Intelligence intercepted an SSS signal at 201 '4 from an 
unidentified steamer at 09° 10' N, 81© 07' £ concerning pursuit by a 
submarine, and at 2040 the repetition by Colombo of a QQQ signal Prom 
the British steamer F00 SHTNG (2,234 GRT) at 09° 23' N, 81 o 00« £. 

Pacific ^Ocean * 

Allied reconnaissance at 0128 reported 2 destroyers and 1 
steamer off New Hanover (Bismarck Archipelago) and at 03^2 a southeast- 
bound heavy cruiser off Bougainville. 

Radio intelligence also Intercepted a code word issued by an unidentified 
naval commander, evidently in connection with operations in the Madagascar 
area or some spot in the southwest Pacific. 

2. Own Situation : 

Ship "10" reported at lolj by short signal: "27 Sep. second 
group not deciphered; 8 Oct. 1000 Neckar." 



The Naval Staff confirms receipt by Radiogram 1856 to ship "10 



». 



"1. Naval Staff assumes from brief signal that ship "13" will 
leave Balikpapan 27 Sep. and arrive at rendezvous point "Neckar" at 
1000 on 8 Oct. 

2. Naval Attache, Tokyo is being instructed as follows by 
the Naval Staff: If interpretation in 1. is wrong, repeat." 

The Naval Staff informs ship "10" and all ships in foreign waters by 
Radiogram 2128 that the REGENSBURG left Batavia on 28 Sep. and will 
arrive at Singapore at 0900 on 1 Oct., and that the RHAK0TIS left 
Yokohama on 27 Sep., will call at Bangkok, Shogan, Balikpapan, and 
Batavia, and leave Batavia on 29 Oct. 

According to the German Armistice Commission, France, the British ad- 
vance from Tananarive to the south reached the area 50'km. south of the 
capital on 27 Sep. in the face of opposition. (See Telegram 19^5.) 

On 29 Sep. the Japanese Naval Attache delivered the written reply of 
the Japanese Navy concerning operational areas for Gorman auxiliary 
cruisers. It includes a chart of the operational area suggested by the 
Naval Staff in the Indian Ocean, and points out that the agreement is 
only temporary, "since a new agreement will be reached when operations 
by a German auxiliary cruiser become possible." 

The Japanese agree with the suggestion of the Nazal Staff concerning 
the area in the southeast Pacific south of 00 and east of 120O w, with 
the following proviso: 

a. Since Japan strongly desires Argentina and Chile to re- 
main neutral, the ships of these 2 countries are not to be attacked in 
the Pacific. 



B-105 2 
- 327 " 



29 Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

b. There should be no operations off the coast of Chile. 
In addition the Naval Attache stated orally: 

a. Indian Ocean : 

The Japanese Navy approves the suggested zone of opera- 
tions (35° S, 60° E as far as 15° S, 85° E; from there to 15° S, 900 E, 
to 25° S, lioo E, to 45° S, 110O E), and in addition permits operations 
in the area vest thereof south of 4oo s and west of 60<> E. 

The Japanese Navy requests information at least 2 weeks in advance when 
operations are planned in this area. 

In case Japanese forces will operate in this area, the Japanese Navy will 
inform Germany in time. 

b. Southeastern Pacific : 

For the time being the Japanese Navy agrees to an opera- 
tions zone for German auxiliary cruisers south of the Equator and east 
of 120° W, but requests for political reasons that no attacks be made 
on Argentine and Chilean ships and that there be no operations off the 
Chilean coast. 

No assistance can be expected for the time being in Japanese bases in 
the New Guinea area and the mandated islands. 

Subsequently the Japanese Naval Attache is briefly Informed about the 
area in which German submarines are expected to operate off Capetown in 
the near future. 

The Naval Staff will send corresponding instructions to the Naval At- 
tache at Tokyo and the auxiliary cruisers, especially ship "45". 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Enemy Situation : 
Nothing to report. 

2. Own Situation : 

Atlantic Coast : 

Blockade-runner BURGENLAND had to turn back because of engine 
trouble and entered the Gironde at midnight. No particular reports 
have been received concerning the BRAKE. The breakthrough is evidently 
being made according to plan. The RIO GRANDE has been ordered to leave 
on 30 Sep. 

There were no changes in the situation along the Atlantic coast. 

Channel Area : 

7 vessels of the 5th PT Boat Flotilla carried out a mining 
mission in the night of 28 Sep. according to plan. For brief report 
see Telegram 1023. 



- 328 - B " 1052 



29 Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

An operation to lay minefields "Emll" 5 and 6 in order to strengthen 
the flanking barrages off Fecamp is planned for the night of 29 Sep. 
and has already been started. 

Otherwise nothing special to report. 

Special Items ; 

The Commanding Admiral, Group West (Admiral Saalwaechter) 
stated by telegram on 20 Sep. in the matter of communications (see War 
Diary 23 Sep. and 26 Aug.), prior to receiving the opinion of the Naval 
Staff of 22 Sep., that up to 20 Sep., the day he relinquished his com- 
mand, no cases had come to his attention in which the Naval Staff was 
not satisfied with the manner in which Group West reported; he con- 
cludes that no such cases occurred in the area of Group West. 

The reaction to the communication from the Naval Staff 
mentioned above, dated 22 Sep., remains to be seen. 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 

1. North Sea ; 

Another ground mine was swept north of Hook of Holland. North 
of Splckeroog a mine exploded next to patrol boat "1213" in 32 meters 
of water, evidently an acoustic mine. 

Otherwise nothing to report. 

2. Norway, Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation ; 

Reconnaissance over Iceland, the Denmark Strait, and the 
eastern coast of Greenland furnished no tactical information. 

Approximately 45,000 GRT of merchant tonnage were in Molotovsk. At 
the mouth of the Dvina 4 steamers totalling 15,000 GRT were sighted. 
On 28 Sep. there were 27 ships in the harbor of Archangel; the type 
and size could not be determined. 

Own Situation ; 

During the night of 28 Sep. an enemy battery on the Rybachi 
Peninsula unsuccessfully fired at a westbound convoy and at Nurmansaetti . 
We returned fire. 

Enemy bombers unsuccessfully attacked Havnlngsberg from an altitude of 
100 meters at 1445. At 1542 an enemy reconnaissance plane flew over 
Bogen Bay and probably saw that the TIRPITZ was leaving for the Vest 
Fjord for maneuvers. 

Mine ships ROLAND and SKAGERRAK left Chris tiansand South for the south 
at 2230. 

Submarine U "117" is laying mines near Iceland. 

Otherwise nothing special to report. 



- J29 - 8-105 2 



Apr. 19-- COCTIDSMTIAL 

IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, 3altic Sea 

In accordance with the directive of the Naval Staff, Naval Station, 3altic 

a cancelled all limitations imposed by the Navy on merchant shipping 
in the Baltic Sea. Only the declared areas are to be observed as here- 
tofore. 

This step was taken since no enemy submarine has been 
reported since those off the Swedish coast and Libau on 
17 and 28 Aug. 

Now, according to the report by Naval Station, Baltic, it is believed 
that steamer FRANZ RUDOLF was sunk off Funkenhagen (see Var Diary 28 
Sep.) by a torpedo. 

Further information must be awaited. If an enemy subma- 
rine was responsible, not only merchant shipping in the 
southern part of the Baltic would be affected, but es- 
pecially submarine training and fleet movements would be 
considerably hampered. 

The Armed Forces Operations Staff informed the Haval Staff of its reply 
to the request of the Commanding General, Armed Forces, Denmark, in 
ch it was stated that the Armed Forces High Command and the Naval 
Staff recognize the importance of the sea lanes from Varnemuende to 
Gjedser as veil as those in the Sound and the Great 3elt, and consider 
protection of these routes as important as that of other essential 
routes. However, it is necessary, in view of the many tasks to be per- 
formed and the limited number of minesweepers available, to decide from 
case to case depending on the situation where minesveeping operations 
are most important. 

This is the stand the Naval Staff had asked the Armed Forces High Com- 
mand to take. 

In accordance with the directive of the Armed Forces High Command Opera- 
tions Staff concerning reinforcement of coastal defenses, the Commanding 
General Armed Forces, Denmark informed the Naval Staff Quartermaster 
Division that at present no all-around defenses can be provided for 
Skagen and Frederikshaven, since only limited equipment is available". 
Since these 2 localities are the only ones about which the Navy is con- 
cerned, the Naval Staff has no interest in other aspects of the question 
at the present time. 

The Naval Staff Quartermaster Division will handle the matter. 

Eastern Baltic Sea ; 

Zr.emy Situation : 

According to the Air Force Operations Staff, 16 British 
planes, among them 6 seaplanes^ arrived in Leningrad on 26 Sep. for the 
purpose of laying mines. 

Own Situation : 

Between Tytersaari and Peninsaari 8 mines and 8 cutter floats 
were swept. The weather somewhat interfered with minesveeping opera- 
tions in the Gulf of Finland and the Gulf of Riga. 

Convoy and transport operations proceeded according to plan. 



- 330 - 






29 Mar. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

The Armed Forces Operations Staff has now confirmed by telephone that 
Finland has agreed to the transfer of the coastal mine vessels and 
Italian subchasers from Lake Ladoga to the Gulf of Finland. 

The Naval Staff therefore instructed Group North to take the necessary 
steps for the immediate transfer of the vessels. 

Upon inquiry by the Italian Admiral at the Naval Staff, he is informed 
of the plans to transfer the Italian subchasers and have them operate 
from Kotka as long as the ice situation permits, and to have them spend 
the winter at Reval thereafter. 



V. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation ; 

A plane attacked a westbound submarine with depth charges 
240 miles northwest of Rockall Bank; another plane sighted an east- 
bound submarine In the same area in the afternoon. 

Air reconnaissance around Iceland was lively, and the 19th Air Group 
was active as far as 130 w. A plane sighted a submarine approximately 
265 miles northwest of Cape Ortegal, and reported that it probably scored 
a hit with a depth charge. 

A report of a submarine attack near St. Johns was intercepted from off 
the U.S. east coast. 

2. Own Situation : 

3 more submarines have left for the zone of operations. Sub- 
marines U "116" and U "118" are on supply missions in the North Atlantic. 
U "118" located a westbound convoy with strong air cover in quadrant 
AL 2641, but is unable to maintain contact and is heading for the supply 
point scheduled for 7 Oct. 

Submarine U "610" reported torpedoing a single 4,000 GRT vessel in 
quadrant AL 4244. The crew left the ship, which remained afloat with 
the lumber cargo afire. . 

Group "Luchs" was ordered to operate against the enemy vessels reported 
by submarine U "118". 

4 submarines were organized into a new group "Letzter Ritter". They are 
to form a patrol line from quadrants AL 7157 to AL 7468. 

Concern is felt about U "253" and U "165". 

The only other successes were reported by submarine U "125" of group 
"litis", which sank steamer OGILVY (3,391 GRT) and tanker COTATI (3,963 
GRT) south of the Freetown area. 

For further details see supplement to submarine situation in War Diary, 
Part B, Vol. IV. 



VI. Aerial Warfare 



8-1052 
- 331 " 



Sep. 1Q^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 
Reconnaissance and fighter bomber missions. 

2. Incursions ; 

There vere 28 enemy incursions during the night of 29 Sep., 
20 of them into Reich territory, where the hydrogenation plant at 
Poelitz was unsuccessfully- attacked with h bombs. Mines were reported 
dropped in the Baltic Sea Entrances, near Ruegen, and in the Stettiner 

Haff. 

3. Mediterranean Theater : 

Reconnaissance activity. In the Gibraltar area a Ju 88 strafed 
and damaged a patrol vessel. 

4. Eastern Front : 

70 enemy planes were reported shot down at the Army front. 

Reconnaissance activity over the Black Sea and the Arctic Ocean. Photo- 
graphs were taken of a battery on Kanin Nos. At noon 9 BE 109' s at- 
tacked the airfield at Varlamovo, scoring hits . In dogfights between 
29 BE 109's and 30 enemy fighters 5 enemy planes were shot down. 20 Ju 
88 's flew armed reconnaissance missions over Archangel. A coastal 
steamer entering Reidar Fjord was attacked unsuccessfully. 



VII. Warfare In the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

1. Enemy Situation, Mediterranean : 

l4l planes, an exceptionally high number, are in Gibraltar. 

The MALAYA and 4 destroyers were on maneuvers outside the harbor until 
1500. 

According to the radio intercept service there are several submarines 
between Gibraltar and Malta. 

Submarines were located off Derna and Tobruk. 

During the night of 28 Sep. the radio intercept service located a ship 
or naval force at sea in the eastern Mediterranean, probably in the 
Alexandria area. Other vessels were located in the Haifa-Beirut area. 

2. Own Situation, Mediterranean : 

According to the German Naval Command, Italy, the emergency 
message on the evening of 28 Sep. was not sent by Marsa Matruh, but it 
is the second case of successful misleading enemy messages. 

During the night of 28 Sep. steamer RAVENNA (1,148 GRT) was attacked 
by enemy torpedo planes off Punta Stilo, and ran aground while evading 
aerial torpedoes . 

Motor ship UNI0NE was towed into Navarino. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa : 



- 332 - 



* 



29 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

Nothing special to report. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 

Aegean Sea : 

An enemy submarine was sighted off Milos the evening of 28 Sep. 

Convoy service according to plan. For correction of the reports on 
transports and convoys in the Aegean Sea for August 1942 see daily sit- 
uation report. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reported 1 submarine west- southwest and 
1 south of Sevastopol. Numerous small vessels were observed off 
Gelendzhik. A submarine fired on the Eitodor radar station. Reconnais- 
sance activity against the ports and bases in the Crimea continued un- 
diminished, centering on Taman and Kerch. 

The Naval Attache at Istanbul transmitted an agent report according to 
which Russian naval forces are planning to attack Constanta during 
the night of 3 Oct. 

Own Situation : 

Of the 79 mines in the Kamish Burun barrage, 74 have been 
swept so far. 

Only naval barges and a few engineer assault boats are operating in the 
Kerch Strait at the present time. 22 Army Siebel ferries have been 
inactive since 23 Sep. because of lack of fuel. 

Convoy service proceeded according to plan. 

Group South approves and transmits the situation evaluation of the 
Admiral, Black Sea, who expects increased interference with our shipping, 
especially with supply transports, as the development of the land situa- 
tion necessarily causes the Russians to decrease their escort and convoy 
operations. He once more calls attention to the advisability of plane 
attacks directly on the fleet bases of the enemy. (See Telegram 1200.)' 

The telegram was sent simultaneously to the naval liaison officers at 
the Army High Command, Army Group A, and the 4th Air Force. 



VIII. Situation East Asia 

According to a report from the U.S. Navy Department, American positions 
in the Solomon islands have been expanded somewhat. On 25 Sep. heavy 
U.S. bombers attacked Japanese bases and ships southeast of the Buka 
Strait, and on 26 Sep. successfully attacked 1 Japanese cruiser and 
transport vessels in the vicinity of Shortland Island. At the same 
time Japanese installations and ships at Kiska were attacked with ob- 
served effect on 24 and 25 Sep. 

An official Chungking report claims that the city of Nanmashin in 
Chekiang was captured and the suburbs of Tangyang occupied. In the 



- 333 - 



B-1052 



29 Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

Kinhwa sector the Japanese are said to have retreated further toward 
Hatschau. 

According to a Japanese official report the commander of a Japanese 
Army group in central China, General Sakai, was killed on 28 Sep. 

No Japanese reports have been received concerning the operations re- 
ported by the enemy. 







IX. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

* 

Army Group A ; 

Our attack in the direction of Tuapse is gaining ground very 
slowly on account of stubborn enemy resistance. Hard fighting has de- 
veloped on the Terek front, also, in almost all sectors. 

Army Group B ; 

In the sector of the 6th Rumanian Army the enemy succeeded in 
capturing Sadovoye. German defense positions are being put up toward 
the south near Tundostovo. 

In Stalingrad the seesaw battle continues in various parts of the city. 
Enemy pressure has increased on the north front. South of Kotluban the 
situation was temporarily critical. Further enemy advances in various 
sectors of our Don line were repulsed. 

Central Army Group ; 

At Korsun and south of Sukhinichi very lively fighting. North- 
east of Rzhev enemy attacks were repulsed. At Sloboda and at Velizh 
our advances were successful. 

Northern Army Group ; 

West of Sychevo fierce fighting is in progress. One strong- 
point was lost after almost all of the personnel was killed. Our attack 
In order to widen the land bridge to the II Army Corps is making progress. 
South of Schluesselburg our troops have launched a concentric attack on III 

the enemy pocket west of Gaitolovo, and are making good progress. The I' 

enemy is making a stubborn effort to break through our lines In the 
east through attacks from the inside and the outside. In the Neva sector 
attacks on the enemy bridgehead and its supply lines are continuing. 

2. Finnish Front : 
Situation unchanged. 

3. North Africa ; 

Nothing special to report. 



**#***♦****♦******»*♦*♦♦♦ 



B-1052 

- 33* - 



+ 



C ONFIDENTIAL 
30 Sep. 19^2 

Items of Political Importance 

A remark appearing In the Times is of Interest with regard to the re- 
newed discussion regarding the establishment of a second front. It 
states that Germany cannot be beaten by Russia alone, not even in con- 
junction with an air offensive from the west, and that the Anglo-American 
land armies are indispensable. An Allied offensive is needed, which 
however might take an entirely different form from what is usually be- 
lieved. 

This remark might be interpreted in any way. 

In the House of Commons Churchill gave a number of explanations. He 
termed French resistance on Madagascar mostly symbolic in character. 
Tulear, the last harbor in the south of the island, surrendered follow- 
ing an ultimatum. He said that public discussions of future Allied op- 
erations are most undesirable, even when such discussions are based on 
conjectures and not on secret information. 

According to a report from a diplomatic source, tension between the 
British and the Russians in Iran has increased further. The Russians 
have gained greatly in influence by arming the Kurds. 

Argentina ; 

According to Reuter, the Chamber voted 67 to 64 in favor of breaking 
off diplomatic relations with the Axis. For the time being this de- 
cision is only a significant gesture, since the Senate and the Govern- 
ment will not take any further action. 

Arabia : 

According to a Transocean News Agency report from Ankara, it is believed 
in Damascus that the fact that the U.S. has offered to lend money to 
Saudi Arabia indicates that the U.S. has been given the upper hand in 
Saudi Arabia as the result of secret Anglo-American agreements concern- 
ing spheres of influence in the Near East. 

This thr^"« a light on American war aims] 

Tibet: 

According to a Swedish report from London, the old caravan route between 
Tibet and China is to become the supply route for Chungking instead of 
the Burma Road. 

India : 

A U.S. senator demanded the immediate solution of the India problem, 
which is not a matter of concern to Great Britain alone. 



Special Items 

I. In order to protect our submarines against the enemy air force it 
would be important to push our departure bases closer to the main enemy 
communication routes. The occupation of the Iberian Peninsula and of 



Brl052 

- 335 - 



Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

Gibraltar plays a decisive role in the discussions of this problem by 
the Naval Staff. Because of the few forces available, such plans can- 
not be carried out at the present time, however. A surprise occupation 
Is impossible without previously occupying the Iberian Peninsula. The 
only measure that can be taken with regard to the Bay of Biscay at the 
moment is to increase German air operations over this area as well as 
against the enemy airfields. The fact that it takes very long to develop 
suitable types of planes should not be given undue importance, but 
should rather serve as an incentive to speed up the procedure. 

In order to combat enemy convoys on the northern routes enemy bases might 
be attacked, and this would at least temporarily relieve our submarine 
operations . 

The Naval Staff therefore orders Group North to investigate the possibil- 
ities of eliminating the enemy weather stations on Jan Ma yen and Bear 
Island prior to the ice season. This requires thorough air reconnais- 
sance in advance, which the 5th Air Force is to be asked to provide. 
The Air Force Operations Staff is being informed by the Naval Staff. 

For copy see l/Skl I op 1923/^2 Gkdos . Chefs, in War Diary, Part C, 
Vol. Ha. 

The Naval Staff asked the Armed Forces Intelligence Division to investi- 
gate possibilities for using sabotage troops on Iceland, pointing out 
that it is very important to Interfere with the enemy's use of the air 
fields and naval bases on this island. Air forces can be used against 
this enemy base only to a very limited extent, and an invasion is out 
of the question entirely at the present time. Therefore the only pos- 
sibility for harassing the enemy and perhaps inflicting some, even if 
not very important, damage to his installations is by using sabotage 
troops . 

II. See War Diary, Part C, Vol. XII for the August 19^2 report on the 
war economy situation compiled by the War Economy Division, Armed Forces 
High Command. 

According to this report, armament production was on the whole satis- 
factory in spite of increased day and night attacks in western Germany. 

By 3 Sep. 1,312,000 Russian and Galician civilian laborers and 450,000 
Russian prisoners of war were being used In Germany. 



So far there are 600,000 French workers, and 350,000 more have been re- 
quested. 

The transport situation is satisfactory. 

The raw material situation is still critical. The rubber situation de- 
pends to a great extent on imports of crude rubber from Japan. 

Seizure of the Maikop area has so far not relieved the oil situation. 



II 



Situation 30 Sep. 19^2 
I. War in Foreign Waters 
1. Enemy Situation ; 



- 356 - 



•> 



♦ 



30 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

South Atlantic : 

The auxiliary cruiser ANDALUCIA STAR left Buenos Aires on 
25 Sep. and is expected in Freetown on 8 Oct. 

Indian Ocean : 

The British steamer NEWCHWANG (2,485 GRT) sent a QQQ signal 
at 1740 reporting a suspicious vessel at 25° 20' S, 51° 08 1 E. 

2. Own Situation : 

Ship "10" reported hy short signal at 1558 that the Naval 
Staff confirmed the short signal of 22 Sep. incorrectly in Radiogram 
I856. It should read: "Transfer completed 29 Sep." 

The Naval Staff confirmed the message by Radiogram 1745.. 

Information on the enemy situation was sent to all ships in foreign 
waters by Radiograms 0523 and 0700. 



II. Situation West Area 

1. Atlantic Coast : 

Group West reports that the engine repairs on the BURGENLAND 
will be completed at 2200. 

According to air reconnaissance, the BRAKE was in quadrant BE 8796 at 
1330. 

Departure of blockade-runner RIO GRANDE has been postponed for 24 hours. 
The Italian blockade -runner PIETRO 0RSE0L0 is also scheduled to leave 
on 1 Oct. 

Mine detonating vessel "1" was damaged off Lorient by an explosion in 
21 meters of water and was towed in. 

2. Channel Coast : 

Mine operation "Donau" was carried out according to plan. Op- 
eration "Mosel" was postponed because of the weather. In addition, op- 
eration "Main" is scheduled for the night of 30 Sep. 

3. Special Item : 

Since another vessel of the 5th Torpedo Boat Flotilla is out 
of commission, the Naval Staff decides not to use this flotilla for 
escorting ship "45" and orders that all vessels of the 5th Torpedo Boat 
Flotilla ready for operations be transferred to the west area by agree- 
ment between Group West and the Fleet (Commander. Destroyers) not later 
than the middle of October. (See Telegram 1718.) 



III. North Sea, Norway, Arctic Ocean 



8-1052 

- 357 - 



30 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

1. North Sea : 

The Dutch motor ship GERDINIA sank north of Borkum as the re- 
sult of a mine. Mine detonating vessels swept 2 mines near Juist. 'Con- 
voy traffic was hampered by had weather. In the evening enemy planes 
flew over the German Bight. It is suspected that they dropped mines 
near Borkum, Terschelling, and Ameland. 1 plane was shot down by a 
patrol boat near Terschelling. 

Contradictory to the belief of the Commissioner for Maritime Shipping 
(see War Diary 18 Sep.) that the most dangerous area for shipping is 
between Ameland and Heligoland, and that this danger would not be re- 
duced by rerouting traffic via Delfzijl, Group North states that the 
danger area for merchant shipping is definitely between Borkum and Hook 
of Holland due to an increase in ground mines and air attacks, as well 
as enemy motor gunboats which have recently appeared there. 

Between January and August 1942 traffic between the Ems and the Elbe, 
also in the Ems estuary, consisted of 2,793 ships totalling 6,068,185 
GRT. Of these, 10 ships totalling 30,114 GRT, or .5$, were lost. 

In the same period between Borkum and Hook of Holland traffic consisted 
of 1,353 ships of 5,393,086 GRT. Of these 13 ships totalling 58,626 
GRT, or 1.7^ were lost. 

The Group points out once more the necessity of expanding the Dutch 
canal system, emphasizing the military rather than the economic aspect. 
(See Telegram 1209.) 

2. Norway, Arctic Ocean ; 

Enemy Situation : 

Air reconnaissance reported 4 patrol boats on northeasterly 
course north of Iceland. Photo reconnaissance of Archangel on 29 Sep. 
showed 2 destrcr Q rs of the CHURCHILL class, 2 Russian destroyers, 2 
camouflaged destroyers in dock, 2 corvettes. 1 torpedo boat, 47 steamers 
totalling 147,000 GRT, among them 18 above 4,000 GRT, and 48 planes. 

Own Situation : 

On 29 Sep. the Russian battery on Rybachi Peninsula fired 100 
rounds at an eastbound convoy and a few rounds at Petsamo and Nurmansaetti 
without causing any damage. The 1/773 battery returned the fire with 
17 rounds. Results were not observed. 

On 28 and 29 Sep. enemy planes were active over the arctic coast and 
In the Stavanger area. No damage was reported. 

Mine ships ROLAND and SKAGERRAK have completed the flanking minefield 
on the southwest coast. 

Convoy traffic according to plan. 

The Commanding Admiral, Norway reports that he plans to have the sub- 
marine barrage off Petsamo, permission for which has been granted, laid 
at a depth of 12 and not 10 meters, in order to safeguard the large 
steamers which are being used again on the Petsamo run. (See Telegram 
1140.) 

Group North gives permission by Telegram 1642. 



- 338 - 



B-1052 



♦ 



♦ 



30 Mar. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

Via Telegram 1300 the Admiral, Arctic Ocean reports his order to trans- 
fer the HIPPER from the Kaa Fjord to the Bogen Bay under escort of 2 
destroyers and 2 torpedo boats. The transfer is to take place on 1 Oct. 
(See Telegram 2040.) 

Otherwise no special incidents in the Arctic Ocean. 



IV. Skagerrak, Baltic Sea Entrances, Baltic Sea 

Fog interfered with channel sweeping in the area of the Commanding Ad- 
miral, Defenses, Baltic Sea . 

See Telegram 2145 for the report of the Commanding Admiral, Defenses, 
Baltic Sea to the Naval Cperations Division (copy to Group North) con- 
cerning cooperation with the Danish Navy. The behavior of the Danish 
Navy is termed entirely correct and accommodating. The Danish Navy 
refused only in one case to furnish escorts outside of the inner waters. 
The Commanding Admiral, Defenses, Baltic Sea believes that further co- 
operation with the Danish Navy is absolutely essential. 

In the central Baltic Sea the steamer ANNELIESE CHRISTOPHERSEN evaded 
2 torpedoes 5 miles off Rixhoe£*t at 0229. At 0930 a submarine of the 
24th Submarine Flotilla definitely observed a bubble track and a surface 
runner 10 miles southwest of Kernel. At 1658 vessels of the 24th Motor 
Minesweeper Flotilla issued a submarine warning 27 miles southwest of 
Bruesterort. Submarine chase is in progress at all 3 points. 2 enemy 
submarines seem to be in the Memel-Danzig area. According to statements 
by members of the crew of steamer FRANZ RUDOLF, an enemy submarine was 
also sighted in the vicinity of that ship. 

Group North ordered the fleet maneuvers delayed 2 or 3 days because of 
acute submarine and ground mine danger. The Second Admiral, Submarines, 
as agreed, is withdrawing all submarines and vessels from the training 
area until 2 Oct. inclusive. Naval Station, Baltic Sea orders subchase 
at once in the area east of Bornholm and south of the Wartburg mine- 
fields with all available vessels including the 15th Minesweeper Flotilla, 

The time will be agreed upon with the Second Admiral, Submarines. 

Group North states that it is urgently necessary to allocate torpedo 
boats to the Naval Station, Ealtic Sea for intensive subchasing. See 
Telegram 1551. 

The Second Admiral, Submarines points out that submarine training and 
the continuation of submarine warfare require that all training areas 
in the Eay of Denzig as well as the routes to and from the Bay of 
Danzig along the coast of Pomerania be kept free from submarine chase. 
Effective immediately, the Second Admiral, Submarines puts 4 recovery 
vessels of the 24th Submarine Flotilla at the disposal of Naval Station, 
Baltic Sea through 2 Oct. More vessels cannot be provided. 

Minesweeping activities in the area of the Commander, Minesweepers, 
Baltic Sea had to be cancelled in part because of the weather. Other 
activities according to plan. 

Naval Liaison Staff, Finland reports that the Finns have no longer any 
objections against the planned withdrawal of German coastal mine vessels 
from Lake Ladoga. 

The Finnish Commander in Chief has had inquiries made with the Italian 

_ 559 _ B-105 2 



30 Mar. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

authorities whether it would be possible to purchase 4 Italian sub- 
chasers. The Naval Liaison Staff believes that this solution would be 
very desirable because of transport difficulties. See Telegram 1035. 

Group North supports the suggestion of the Admiral, Ealtic Countries to 
postpone withdrawing the Naval Liaison Officer with the 11th Army, as 
planned by the Naval Officer Procurement Division, until after operation 
^Nordlicht". 

The Naval Staff supports this suggestion also. 



V. Merchant Shipping 

1. The German Armistice Commission (Naval Section) transmitted a 
telegram for the information of the Naval Staff which the German Armis- 
tice Commission sent on 18 Sep. to the Armed Forces High Command about 
the transfer of ships discussed by the Commissioner of Maritime Shipping 
and Laval. 

For copy see l/Skl 2^223/^2 Gkcos. in War Diary, Part C, Vol. XI. 

According to this telegram immobilized French ships will not be used 
in traffic between the Black Sea and the western Mediterranean until 
naval warfare in the Black Sea and the Mediterranean has stopped. The 
Naval Section of the German Armistice Commission is to determine when 
this is the case In agreement with the naval subcommission of the French 
delegation. In addition, the necessary fuel oil will have to be made 
available. There is no provision for selling or chartering the ships. 

This would indicate that the practical results of the 
discussions between the Commissioner of Maritime Shipping 
and Laval are very slight, after all. 

2. On the basis of observations during an inspection tour of the 
Sound made by representatives of the Naval Staff and Naval Station, 
Baltic Sea, the Naval Station, Baltic Sea ordered the Naval Command, 
Denmark to take all measures necessary to speed up merchant shipping 
in the Sound, if necessary in consultation with the Commanding Admiral, 
Defenses, Baltic Sea. The Naval Command, Denmark is also to investigate 
what measures are needed in order to be able to use Swedish territorial 
waters In the Sound as an alternate route. For details see Telegram 
2039. 



VI. Submarine Warfare 

1. Enemy Situation : 

Lively reconnaissance activity In the Bay of Biscay. Two in- 
bound submarines were reported. 

A British steamer with call letters VI Vi was pursued by a submarine 
500 miles east of Newfoundland. 

2. Own Situation: 



- J40 - B-::; 



• 



♦ 



30 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

a. Distribution of submarines : 

Total 367 

in operations area 199 

in training 56 

with the Warship Construction 

Testing Command 112 

The 199 submarines in the operations areas were distributed as follows 
on 30 Sep. : 

Atlantic: 

in the operations area 108 

in harbors 55 

Arctic Ocean : 

in the operations area 3 

in harbors 18 

Mediterranean 

in the operations area 5 

in harbors 10 

b. Submarine operations : 

. Group Luchs in the North Atlantic is to take up positions 
In quadrants AK 2449 to AK 3959 on 1 Oct. at 0100. 

Group Tiger is being dissolved. 

On 2 Oct. 4 submarines are to refuel from submarine U 116. 

Two outbound submarines were notified of the departure of the BRAKE for 
emergency purposes. 

Submarine U 513 sank an ore steamer of 6,000 GRT off the U.S. coast in 
quadrant BB 6386. 

In the West Indies submarine U 516 sank a 1>500 GRT coastal steamer in 
quadrant E0 6595 and a 5,000 GRT steamer in quadrant E0 5637. 

Submarine 506 of the litis group sank the former Danish steamer SIAM 
(6,637 GRT) in quadrant ET 8831. 

Following the first attacks off Capetown, the submarines of the Eisbaer 
group as well as submarines U 179 and U 178 are given permission to at- 
tack all ships east of the line between quadrants FE 91 and GZ 16 as 
far as 4oo s. 

All submarines in quadrants BE and BF are informed that the enemy has 
become aware of the great number of homebound submarines and has in- 
creased surveillance of the Bay of Biscay. The Naval Staff has Investi- 
gated whether outgoing submarines could take along radar interception 



- Ml - 



B-1052 



30 Mar. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

sets for the submarines which are not yet so equipped. The Chief, Naval 
Communications Division answered in the affirmative. The Commanding 
Admiral, Submarines has b9en informed accordingly. 

The 3 submarines operating in the western Mediterranean were assigned 
new attack areas in view of possible further enemy convoy activity. 

For details see supplement to the submarine situation in War Diary, Part 
B, Vol. IV. 

The former directive is changed to the effect that Swedish ships found 
outside the operations area proceeding between Portugal and Argentina are 
not to be sunk for the time being, but if possible are to be stopped in 
order to gain information about this traffic. For details see War Diary, 
Part C, Vol. VIII. 

The Naval Staff decides as follows on the intended use of SMA mines 
reported by the Commanding Admiral, Submarines (see War Diary 23 Sep.): 

a. Agree in general with intentions in the following order: 
American coast, Africa coast - with special attention called to the stra- 
tegical significance of Cape traffic. 

b. Submarine U "117" will be made available to Group North for 
the second operation. 

c. Time of operations under a. dependent on SMA mine trials. 



VII. Aerial Warfare 

1. British Isles and Vicinity : 

Reconnaissance flights and fighter bomber missions against 
land targets. For details see daily situation report. 

2. Mediterranean Theater : 

At the German- Italian Army sector there were div( bomber and 
fighter bomber sorties against land targets with good effects. The suc- 
cessful fighter pilot Captain Marseille was killed on the return flight. 
1 steamer of 7,200 GRT was torpedoed in the Gulf of Suez during a tor- 
pedo attack in the night of 29 Sep. by 5 He Ill's. Sinking was not ob- 
served. 

3. Eastern Front : 

70 enemy planes were reported shot down on 29 Sep., 66 on 30 
Sep. 

Reconnaissance activity in the Blac : -: Sea and the Arctic Ocean. 

There was no photographic reconnaissance of Scapa because of the weather 

Sorties from 16 to 25 Sep. : 

At the 1st Air Force: 3,472 German sorties 2,810 enemy sorties 

At the 4th Air' Force: 9,746 German sorties 4,5^9 enemy sorties 

At the Air Force Commands, 



- 542 - 



30 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

East and Don: 3,851 German sorties 4,899 enemy sorties 



• 






VIII. Warfare in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea 

• 1. Enemy Situation,Medlterranean t 

According to an Italian agent report, the CHARYBDIS was no 
longer in Gibraltar at 0830. The submarine tender MAIDSTONE was at sea 
near Gibraltar with 4 destroyers for firing practice from 1000 to 1745. 

t 

According to an unconfirmed intelligence report from Spain, in the morn- 
ing of 29 Sep. 36 blacked-out vessels were seen off Alboran on a westerly 
course, and 20 vessels, allegedly including an aircraft carrier, were 
seen west of Melilla at 1030 on an easterly course. 

1 submarine is reported in the central Mediterranean, 2 in the area off 
Alexandria. On 30 Sep. convoy traffic in the eastern Mediterranean was 
slight. 

Photographic reconnaissance of Alexandria on 29 Sep. was without impor- 
tant results. 

2. Own SituationjMediterranean : 

During the night of 29 Sep. there were enemy air raids on 
Tobruk and Porto Empedocle harbor. 

On 28 Sep. 2 minesweeping planes swept 5 ground mines in the Bay of 
Tobruk. 

Captain Aschmann is substituting for the Commanding Admiral, German 
Naval Command, Italy, who is sick. 

3. Transport of Supplies to North Africa t 
No special incidents. 

4. Area Naval Group South : 
Aegean Sea : 

1 submarine was sighted about 20 miles east of Cape Mallas. 

During the night of 26 Sep. the motor sailing vessel SIMEON was stopped 
and blown up by an enemy submarine. A tug which left Candia for Piraeus 
on 26 Sep. is overdue. 

Otherwise no special incidents. 

Black Sea : 

Enemy Situation : 

During the night of 28 Sep. and on 29 Sep. air attacks on 
Crimean harbors were continued. It is suspected that aerial mines were 
dropped between Suda and Cape Chauda. At Anapa 2 PT boats attempted a 
landing during a simultaneous air attack. 2 torpedoes came up on shore. 

Own Situation: 



- 343 - 



30 Sep. 1942 CONFIDENTIAL 

During the night of 29 Sep. 2 PT boats operated against coastal 
traffic near Cape Idokopas. 

Minesweeping proceeded according to plan. Convoy traffic vas hampered 
by the fog. 

Special Items ; 

1. The Admiral, Aegean Sea and Group South are concerned about the 
fact that setting up German Naval Command, Tobruk and Marsa Matruh 
might create a precedent which would cause the Italians to make similar 
demands in the Aegean area. Reference is made to a similar attempt in 
Suda Bay (see Telegram 1225). 

The Naval Staff vill give an opinion on this matter. 

2. The Operational Staff Scheurlen is at the present time not ready 
for operations due to withdrawals of personnel and to sickness. Group 
South requests that more personnel be provided if this staff is needed 
in the near future for further landing operations. (See Telegram 1735.) 

The Naval Staff considers it necessary to keep the staff 
ready for operations and has informed the Naval Officer 
Personnel Division to this effect. 



IX. Situation East Asia 

A report of the Allied Headquarters speaks of a flanking attack against 
Japanese defense positions in the Owen Stanley area during the battle 
for Moresby. 



X. Army Situation 

1. Russian Front : 

Army Group A : 

Enemy attacks and advances had to be fought off in the northern . 

and western sectors of the front. Some terrain was gained only east of 
Kotlovina in the face of stubborn enemy resistance. German forces were > 

mainly concerned with defense also at the Terek front. 

Army Group B : 

The 14th Panzer Division had to be thrown in in the area south 
of Tsatsa in order to bring an enemy breakthrough at the 6th Rumanian 
Army to a halt. The operation was successful. However Duvoyi-Ovrag re- 
mained in the hands of the enemy. 

South of Stalingrad an enemy attack was repulsed. VTe attacked further 
sectors of the city with success. The southern part of Orlovka was 
taken in spite of stubborn enemy resistance. North of Orlovka about 
80 enemy tanks broke through from the north. However the attack did 
not reach Orlovka. We were able to improve our positions in a counter- 
attack. 

Our assault troops attacked near Voronezh. At Olkhovatka there were 

- j44 - B-1052 



30 Sep. 19^2 CONFIDENTIAL 

strong enemy attacks with bomber support and in some places support by 
ground attack planes. In part the battles are still going on. 

Central Army Group : 

At Novosil we contested the enemy crossing the Susha. Further 
fighting near Belev and in the Rzhev area. During the night of 29 Sep. 
there were enemy air raids on Smolensk, which stopped railroad traffic 
for a day. 

Northern Army Group ; 

An enemy attack was repulsed at the Demyansk front. Our 
counterattack against enemy penetrations at the Knovitsi railroad sta- 
tion were halted. Reserves are being brought up. 

The attack on the pocket at Gaitolovo was continued successfully. The 
Chernaya has been reached at all points from the west and east. Thus the 
operation is in the main completed. 

The enemy is still crossing the Neva toward the Dubrovka area. 

2. Finnish Front ; 

An enemy attack was repulsed on the Karelian Isthmus. 

3. North Africa ; 

After strong artillery preparation with about 5*000 rounds, 
the enemy, supported by about 40 tanks, attacked our positions in the 
southern part of the front near Bir el Mnassic. We took about 200 
prisoners. Evidently this is large-scale reconnaissance in force in 
preparation of the general offensive. 



a**********-************** 



- 3^5 - B-1052 



COHFIDSSTIAL 

GLOSSARY 

A id a 

fod© name for the planned capture of Egypt and the Suez Canal. 

Altnuehl 

" 5n« of the designations for the Sunda Strait as a reference point 
on the German blockade-runner route to Japan. 

Aa leoB 

HSerman reference point at ?^° S, 95° E. 

Bantoa A 

"TocTe name of a mln9field laid northeast of Rybachl peninsula. 

Barbarqssa 

"ITover name for the invasion of the U.S.S.R. begun in 19^1. 

Blue cher 

Cover name for the crossing of the Kerch Strait by German forces 
and capture of the eastern shore. 

DE priority 

*T5rTngende Entwicklung. This classification indicates top priority. 
It included research work, such as the planning of armaments and 
machine tools. 

Donau 

Code name for laying minefield E V off Fecamp. 

Doppelschlag 

Co3e name for an operation by the SCHEER and HIPPER against 
Russian shipping in repetition of the SCHEER 's "Vunderland " opera- 
tion. 

Eispalast 

Operation against convoys PQ 18 and QP 14. 

Elbe 

Code word for laying of barrage F IX in the Channel. 

EMF m ine 

"~STandard mine type Pj a moored Influence nine. 

Etappe 

secret German naval organization for providing German naval units 
with information and supplies from foreign bases. Etappe Japan 
was of great importance for German blockade-running activities. 

Falter 

*~C~ode name for a mlnelaying operation in the northern part of Seine 
Bay. 

Finale 

Code name for mlnelaying operation by the 2nd Minesweeper Flotilla 
in the area 49© 58' N, 00° 49.5' V; 50° 01 ' N, 00° 50.5' W; 50° 
..5' N, 00° 20' W; 50° 0.V N, 00 6 19' VT. 



05. 

)P_ 
aircraft radar equipment. 



Freya apparatus 

— /stfir 



- }46 - 



CONFIDENTIAL 

Q7a torpedo 

Naval torpedo, 7 meter3 long, air driven, with 21 inch diameter. 

Herkul es 

"Code name for the planned capture of Malta in cooperation with 
Italian forces. 

Ilona 

Code name for initial countermeasures against enemy action against 
the Iberian peninsula. 

Iwan 

Code name for minelaying operation by submarine in the Pechora 
estuary. 

John Bull 

Code name for minelaying operation hy submarine U "117" in the area 
66° N, 64° 50 » N, and west of 11° 30* W. 

Kirschbluete 

German "cover name for voyage of Japanese submarine I 30 to Europe. 
The submarine, under Commander Endo, left Japan the middle of April 
and arrived in Lor lent in the beginning of August. She crossed 
the equator on 18 Jul. at 20O V. She had expected to reach Prance 
in the middle of July but was delayed en route. 

Komponisten area 

The area between 25° S and 32© S, and 12© w and 220 W; in this 
area were located points named after composers, such as Schubert, 
Schumann, and Wagner. 

Lachsfang 

Code name for operation by the 20th Mountain Army and the 5th Air 
Force to capture the Murman railroad at Kandalaksha in an attempt 
to cut Russia's supply lines. 

Meisenbalz 

Code name for operation of German surface forces against convoy 
QP 14. 

Mosel 

Code name for laying of minefield E VI off Fecamp. 

Nacht 

Code name for the laying of a cutter float barrage in the northern 
part of Seine Bay. 

Narpa 

Code name for minefield laid by German and Finnish forces south of 
Somer i . 

Nashorn 

Code name for a series of German minefields designed to keep Russian 
submarines from breaking out of the Gulf of Finland into the Baltic 
Sea. They extended from Nargen on the Estonian side to Porkkala 
on the Finnish side. 

Neckar 

A" German reference point at 34° 00' N, 139° 50' E. 

News Analysis "Foreign Navies" (Nachrichtenauswertung "Fremde Marinen") 
A dally analysis of foreign newspaper reports concerning foreign 



- 347 - 



B-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 

naval news, compiled by the Naval Intelligence Division (3/Skl). 

Nordlich t 

Code naae for the reneved Aray operations against Leningrad In 
September 1942. 

Oder 

" Code word for laying of barrage F VIII in the Channel. 

Orleans 

' Geraan reference and rendezvous point located at 34° S, 50° E. 

Paul 

Code naae for alnelaylng operation by a submarine In the western 
entrance of the Yugor Strait. 

Peter 

Code naae for alnelaylng operation in the western entrance of 
Matochkin Strait carried out by submarine U "589". 

Political Review (Politische Uebersicht) 

A daily review of political developments abroad published by the 
Naval Intelligence Division (3/Skl ) . 

PS 

Designation of convoys proceeding from the United Kingdom to 
northern Russia. 

Designation of convoys proceeding from Russia to the United Kingdoa. 

QQQ signal 

Distress signal sent by ship when sighting or under attack by 
armed raider. QQQ was also used when suspicious merchant vessels 
were sighted. 

Ranke 

Code naae for mine laying operation to close the gap between bar- 
rages C 2 and D 1 in the English Channel. 

Riegel 

Code name for alnelaylng operation between Lister and Feiestein. 

Roesselsprung 

Code name for operation against convoy PQ 17. 

Rose 

German reference point at 24° 00' S, 99° 00 f E. 

Route "Anton" 

A German shipping route. Its geographical borders were: The 
French coast at 47° 30'. N, 47° 30' N, 29° W; 43° N, 40° W; 37° N, 
40° W; continued on 37° N; the southern and eastern borders of 
route "Anton" were defined by the borders of the operations zone 
of the submarines in the South Atlantic. 

Route "Gelb" 

Route taken by German vessels to Japan, via Indian Ocean and Sunda 
Strait. The points touched on this route are given below. The 
designations of these points were changed from tiae to time and 
differed for each ship. Generally the set of names used for a 
particular ship had the same initial letters as the ship. 



- 348 - B-1052 







CONFIDENTIAL 


1. 


Duesseldorf 


24o 00 • S, 99° 00' E 


2. 


Dahlen 


Sunda Strait 


5. 


Danzig 


09° 15' H, lioo 50 ' E 


4. 


Darmstadt 


200 50 » K, 120© 00' E 


5. 


Duisburg 


26o 00 » N, 128o 40' E 


6. 


Doeberitz 


340 00' N, 139° 50' E 



Runenschrlft 

Code name for minelaying operation to close the gap betveen bar- 
rages D 2 and E 1 in the English Channel. 

Saale 

A German reference point in the Indian Ocean. It vas located at 
• 240 s, 990 e. 

Saege 

German reference point at 260 00' S, l4o 30' E. 

Sauna 

Minefield in the Eastern Baltic Sea. 

Schlaf 

""Code name for minelaying operation in the English Channel. 

Schubert 

German reference point located at 250 s, 22o v. 

Schumann 

German reference point at 31.5° S, 210 w. 

Seeigel 

Code name for German minefield from the island of Aspoe to 60° 4' 

H, 27° 9» E; 59° 54' N, 27° 20.5' E, via Vigrund to Cape Kurgalski. 

4 
Seeteufel 

Code name for plan to close off the Gulf of Finland by a continuous 

and uninterrupted mine barrage extending from the Finnish to the 

Estonian coast in case the Russian fleet should try to break out. 

Siebel ferry 

A double-hull ferry boat developed by Special Command Siebel 
(Sonderkommando Siebel). It consisted of two steel hulls connected 
by means of vooden platforms; there vas a turret in the center. 
The Siebel ferry could be used as a gun platform, troop carrier, 
or supply carrier. 

SMA mines 

Rack mine type A. A moored influence mine laid by a specially 
constructed minelaying submarine. Its charge veighed approximately 
350 kilograms. This mine vas designed for vaters of 50 m. to 300 m. 
depth* 

SSS signal 

Distress signal sent by ship vhen sighting or under attack by a 
submarine; could also indicate being damaged by a mine. 

Standard Mine, type F 

EMF, a moored influence mine. • 

Todt Organization 

A construction organization (named for the founder) vhich built 
the German superhighways, the Vestvall, and the Atlantic fortifica- 
tions. It employed domestic and foreign labor on military projects 

_ 549 - 8-105 2 



CONFIDENTIAL 



both in Germany and In the occupied countries. 



Type VII C 

A 500 ton sea-going submarine (of earlier construction). It vas 
67.I meters (221.45 ft.) in length, had diesel-electric propulsion, 
and was armed with k bow tubes and 1 stern tube. 

Type XB 

A 1,600 ton minelaylng submarine, 89.8 m. (296.34 ft.) in length, 
with normal diesel-electric propulsion. It was equipped with 30 
mine shafts and 2 stern torpedo tubes. 

Utrecht 

German reference point at 37° 3, 00© longitude. 

Wagner 

German reference point at 28° S, 19° W. 

Weichsel 

Code name for laying of barrage R VI in the English Channel. 

Viesengrund 

Cover name for the planned capture of Rybachi Peninsula. 

Wunderlaud 

Code name for operation by the SCHEER during which she attacked 
Russian shipping and shore installations In the Kara Sea in August 
19^2. 

XB report 

Top secret radio intelligence report, as compared to the B or secret 
radio intelligence reports. 

Zar 

Code name for minelaylng operation off the northern tip and north- 
western coast of Novaya Zemlya by the ULM. 

Zarewitsch-Romanow 

Code name for minelaylng operations carried out by German destroyers 
north and south of Kolguyev. 

Zarln 

Code name for minelaylng operation by the HIPPER and destroyers 
northwest of Novoya Zemlya. 



- 350 -